mlk birthday

Scandal: The Mess & Mediocrity

Ok so here goes round two of my attempt to post this. As most of us who are on tumblr regularly and follow most of the prime-time tv shows, knows the trouble that Scandal has been in for the last few seasons, and as someone who was once an avid fan of the show I thought I would throw my two cents in.

1. There can be no argument that the first season of Scandal was great, we finally got to see a black woman be not only the lead of a prime-time drama series, but she wasn’t a cliched, stereotyped character and the icing on the cake Liv was based on an actual person. Olivia was strong, assertive, knew what she wanted and was a great friend, who had the respect of most people she came into contact with. I was a fan of Kerry Washington from her independent film days and more so , from her first mainstream movie outing in Save the Last Dance, where she delivered one of my favourite movie lines ever “keep it up and I will law all your s***t bare, don’t act like you ish don’t stink”, classic and applies to so much, and is very ironic, but I will get to that later.

2.Season one was filled with political intrigue, interesting back stories, great main and guest characters, and the acting was awesome. But then, but then, we got into season two and we see the adulterous relationship between Liv and Fitz start to ease into the forefront of the story, eventually it becomes clear that Liv’s relationship with Fitz affects all aspects of her life. Liv starts to ask Fitz for more and more presidential favours, somethings that to this day still peeves me, because she has no issue asking him to betray his position in office, the people who elected him there (oh wait they didn’t) and to break almost all federal laws. 

3. Season 3 comes around and I begin to see the wheels start to lift completely off the tracks. In almost every scene that Liv has the is delivering some of the most overbearing, contrite, sanctimonious monologues I have ever heard. KW starts to rely on this one expression that irks my soul, trembling lips like she is about to hit the highest note in a Whitney song, with eyes wide open like she is high as a kite. Every scene with Liv and Fitz turns into an argument, she berating him for not being man enough and standing his ground while asking him to compromise his ethics, and him walking in circles, stressing that his love for her knows no bounds, and therefore he will stand his ground and give in to her demands.

4. Season 4 and the train has flown off the tracks heading straight for tv-ville populated by the true fans of Scandal known as Gladiators. S4 the worst thing that could have happened to this show happened, Jake and BS13 became a things, instead of being just a little side story, BS13 and Joe Morton over took Scandal, we see that Liv has some clear family issues, and is inexplicably attracted to Jake (shudders), it becomes clear that Jake was a plant from JM and is only using Liv for some nefarious means. It was when we finally got to see Mama Pope come onto the scene and she is played the the truly fantastic and underrated actress Kandy Alexander, and what do we get, a woman who takes a huge chunk out of her own wrist like she was auditioning for the part of a Walker on The Walking Dead, like ‘what da heck?’ (I honestly thought I was watching the wrong show for a few seconds), stupseee.

5. Season 5 was the beginning of the end for me, we see Live comeback from sitting in the sun with Jake from State Farm, and it is clear that he is her poor substitute for Fitz, whom she hates to love and loves to hate, oy vey these three tire me to my very t.v. bones, the back and forth is ridiculous and I was barely hanging on by my fingertips in hope the show was going to improve, but then one of the biggest slap in the face to fans and the armed forces happened. Liv gets kidnapped for reasons that I am still not fully clear on, besides as a petty swipe at Fitz. We finally see Liv sporting her natural hair and its when she is being held hostage, is looking all kinds of disheveled, and spouting more stupid and ineffective monologues to her captors who essentially laugh in her face.

The thing that killed me was that the only way the writers could see a way out for Liv was her to have her offer to have herself sold on the black market because she is such a hot commodity. I mean really it was 2015 and here we see a black woman put herself up on the fricking auction block during Black History Month (and correct me if I’m wrong but I also think MLKs birthday was around the time of the airing of the ep also), AND we also at this time have a black man sitting the in the actual White House as President, I mean really Shonda, really? I was so disgusted by this, and while all this tom foolery was going on, Fitz sent soldiers into another country to start a war, costing lives and families all for the sake of his side piece, and somehow we were supposed to buy this as some grand romantic gesture and not the war crime it actually was. This episode was the last one I watched in its entirety because I was just so fed up with the shoddy, predictable, trashy and mediocre writing of this show. I was so fed up with the over dramatic acting, needless drama and angst from teenagers posing as adults, and I was just fed up with the mess this once great and important show has become.

I apologise for the extremely long post, but this is something that I have wanted to get off my chest for a while, and after chatting with Redorkulous (check out his tumblr), I felt even more compelled to make this post, but there will be a second post where I speak more to the character traits and schenanigans of the individuals in the show, because trust that I have a lot to say about Live, Jake and Fitz.

huffingtonpost.com
MLK Day 2015: These Rarely Seen Family Photos Of MLK Will Warm Your Heart

We all know Martin Luther King, Jr. to be among the world’s greatest educators, freedom fighters, orators, leaders and truth seekers – but his four children knew of many more loving layers to a man who had already earned a pretty high pedestal in so…

We all know Martin Luther King, Jr. to be among the world’s greatest educators, freedom fighters, orators, leaders and truth seekers – but his four children knew of many more loving layers to a man who had already earned a pretty high pedestal in society.

Despite all the great accolades Dr. King achieved throughout his short-lived life, there was perhaps one role that held prominence over most and that was being a father to his beloved children.

Dr. King and his wife, Coretta Scott King, welcomed four kids (Dexter, Bernice, Yolanda and Martin Luther King III) – all of whom were once pint-sized toddlers who admired their father for reasons too many to list. Decades after his death, their admiration has not dwindled.

On a day commemorating Dr. King and celebrating his legacy, we invite you to a series of photos that show a rarely pictured and uplifting - but not any less authentic – side to Dr. King during his days in Montgomery, Alabama.

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    Bettmann/Corbis After Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is freed from prison under a $2000 appeal bond, he is greeted by his wife Coretta and children, Marty and Yoki, at the airport in Chamblee, Georgia on October 27, 1960.
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    Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. relaxes at home with his family in May 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama.
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    Flip Schulke/Corbis Martin Luther King Jr. and his family eat their Sunday dinner after church on November 8, 1964.
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    Flip Schulke/Corbis Martin Luther King Jr. talks with his daughter on a swing set in the backyard of their home in Atlanta.
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    Flip Schulke/Corbis Martin Luther King Jr. serves pieces of chicken to his young sons Marty and Dexter at Sunday dinner on November 8, 1964.
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    Flip Schulke/Corbis Martin Luther King Jr. holds his young son Dexter on his lap at home in Atlanta, November 8, 1960.
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    Flip Schulke/Corbis Martin Luther King Jr. and his family eat their Sunday dinner after church on November 8, 1964.
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    Michael Ochs Archives via Getty Images Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. relaxes at home with his family in May 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama.
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    Flip Schulke/Corbis Martin Luther King Jr. pushes his young son Dexter on a swing set in their backyard, November 1960.
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    Michael Ochs Archives via Getty Images Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. relaxes at home with his family in May 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama.

Source: Lilly Workneh for The Huffington Post

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Martin Luther King, Jr., was born on this day, January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. King, a Nobel Peace Prize winner and African American Civil Rights Movement leader, combated racial inequality up until his assassination on April 4th. However, his words continue to inspire many today.

Listen to Martin Luther King’s Address at the March on Washington, August 28, 1963 in memory and celebration.

We Remember: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today marks the birthday of  one of this country’s greatest leaders, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Many think the speech he gave at the March on Washington in August of 1963 (pictured above) was his best, but I happen to think the words he spoke to thousands in Memphis the day before a bullet ended his life is his greatest oratory moment. King spent years fighting for the rights of Blacks and, with the assistance of men like Bayard Rustin - his right hand man, came to realize that economic parity was key to realizing the dream he spoke of on the steps of the nation’s capital five years earlier. He knew that economic justice could insure that Blacks and other marginalized people could move forward in this country and was clear that organized labor was one way to achieve that goal.

Then (as is true today) millions of black and brown Americans comprised the workforce that did the jobs no one else wanted to do. King was clear that without an organized labor pool, workers would continue to suffer from wage exploitation and never be able to attain real parity or justice. King, a master of rhetoric, pulls out all the stops in his final speech and makes a call to action that includes all Americans, which resonated deeply with the striking sanitation workers, the people of Memphis, and the world. There are eerily prophetic moments in the speech most particularly where he proclaims that he has seen the Mountaintop and that while he might not get there with the workers in Memphis, he knew they would prevail.

He speaks of the rights given to all Americans. Much like he does in Letter from the Birmingham Jail, in this speech King points out the arguments of his detractors and then gives explicit reasons why they’re misguided in their analysis of the situation. He uses repetition to move the speech forward through time and place and to emphasize the fact that this movement or workers will not and cannot stop:  “I would go on…but I wouldn’t stop there.” He uses this technique to show how injustice has been around forever and that always someone has stood up to speak truth to power and facilitate change.

King then does something that is pure genius; he uses a personal letter from a teenaged white girl to highlight two things – one that this issue of economic justice was not about black and white but about people and their right to earn a fair wage and live decently. He also uses that letter to show that he is here for a reason and that he is in Memphis for a reason. The irony here is that the girl wrote him after an assassination attempt, which he survived, but a short twenty-four hours after giving this speech another attempt would end his life.  

Today workers across the country will march in solidarity because forty-three years After this historic speech, we as a nation are still not in full support of unionization and worker organization. The attack on unions and public workers by the right is, by extension, an attack on people of color who make up significant portions of the public workforce.

As we look back at this speech, we see that a lot of what King says is, unfortunately, still true today. He says, “Something is happening in Memphis and something is happening in our world…Something is happening in our world. Masses of people are rising up. And wherever they are assembled today, whether they are in Johannesburg, South Africa; Nairobi, Kenya; Accra, Ghana; New York City; Atlanta, Georgia; Jackson, Mississippi; or Memphis, Tennessee – the cry is always the same: “We want to be free”.

Today as we scan the news we see that, yes, something is happening in Wisconsin today and something is happening in Indiana – where the rights of public workers are in jeopardy again and the “powers that be” think they can ignore the voices of the people crying out to be heard. And yes, today something is happening in our world and masses of people assemble in public squares, in capital cities and small towns around the world because they want to be free.

What I really love about this speech is that he doesn’t just call out the problems, he calls people to action with practical things all citizens can do to affect change in a non-violent manner. He calls people to action using their economic might, he tells folks that they can hit “the powers that be” in the place where it hurts most – their pockets. He knows that while individually the workers in Memphis are poor, together they are rich enough to change “pharaoh’s” mind.

Like all good social texts, the Mountaintop speech highlights an issue and gives reasons that compel listeners and readers to do something. A good social text informs and changes the quality of light by which we view an issue. A good social text exposes injustice and makes a call to action. It frames and provides context while providing a plan for moving forward. This speech does all of these things and like all good social texts, stands the test of time…

Click here to listen to/read the speech in it’s entirety

Happy Birthday MLK Jr. With all the struggles & injustices, he still found time to laugh & enjoy life while pursuing Freedom, Equity & Justice in peaceful way.‍‌‌‌‌‍‍‍‍‌‌ No act of Terrorism, War, Genocide, Massacre, Kidnapping, etc, etc fueled by hate has ever brought victory. Only peaceful demonstration led by Martin Luther King Jr , Gandhi, Nelson Mandela & others has worked against mighty nations.
“Hate cannot drive out hate, only love can do that.” (Strength to Love, p. 51)