mizumae

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SHINTARO OHATA

Born in Hiroshima, 1975.
Shintaro Ohata is an artist who depicts little things in everyday life like scenes of a movie and captures all sorts of light in his work with a unique touch: convenience stores at night, city roads on rainy day and fast-food shops at dawn etc. His paintings show us ordinary sceneries as dramas. He is also known for his characteristic style; placing sculptures in front of paintings, and shows them as one work, a combination of 2-D and 3-D world.

Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata (previously) currently has two new sculptural paintings on view at Mizuma Gallery in Singapore. Ohata places vibrantly painted figurative sculptures in the foreground of similarly styled paintings that when viewed directly appear to be a single artwork. In some sense it appears as though the figures have broken free from the canvas. These artworks, along with several of his other paintings, join works by Yoddogawa Technique, Enpei Ito, Osamu Watanabe, and Akira Yoshida, for the Sweet Paradox show that runs through August 10th

Txt Via Colossal

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Beijing based artist DU Kun incorporates his passion for rock music into his new oil painting series titled “Revels of the Rock Gods”. His works, which just debuted at Mizuma Gallery in Tokyo, Japan, are monumental portraits of rock musicians that appear carved out of mountains, cliffs, oceans, stones, trees and waterfalls. His first profession while he was in art school was as a rock musician himself, and has since frequently demonstrated his musical prowess. The artist began working on his “Gods of Rock Festival” series in 2014, creating the works out of his own experience with rock music. 

See more on Hi-Fructose.

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Portraits of Chinese Rockstars Imagined as Monumental Temples by DU Kun

Chinese artist DU Kun has long harbored a reverence for music and rockstars. A musician himself, the Beijing-based painter is awed by the creation of music, aspects of fame, and the intangible aura of being a revered rockstar, something he tries to capture is these temple-like portraits of famous Chinese recording artists titled “Revels of the Rock Gods”.

Each oil painting depicts the face of a musician as if it were a temple built in devotion to a god and borrows elements from Buddhist and Confucian architecture. Eyes are depicted as windows, tree branches or waterfalls as flowing hair, and the surface of skin as ornate wood facades gilded with gold.

Kun is currently exhibiting the “Revels of the Rock Gods” series as part of his first solo show in Japan at Mizuma Art Gallery in Tokyo through February 13, 2016. You can explore close-up details plus an archive of Kun’s work on his website. (via Hi-Fructose) and Colossal

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Tenmyouya Hisashi, previously featured on our blog, revives the style of Japanese traditional painting in his contemporary images of futuristic vehicles and robotic warriors on gold leaf. His work is a combination of what is called, “Neo-Nihonga”, a revival of Japanese aesthetic with his own term, “Butouha”, referring to the attitude and resistance against the art system that his art expresses. Well established in Japan, among Tenmyouya’s fans are artist duo known as “indieguerillas”, who incorporate Japanese folklore-inspired beings into their mixed media work; paintings and sculptures of skateboards and other imaginary machines ridden by colorful  characters. 

See more on Hi-Fructose.

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DU Kun Paints Rock and Roll Stars as Deities in “Revels of the Rock Gods”

Beijing based artist DU Kun incorporates his passion for rock music into his new oil painting series titled “Revels of the Rock Gods”. His works, which just debuted at Mizuma Gallery in Tokyo, Japan, are monumental portraits of rock musicians that appear carved out of mountains, cliffs, oceans, stones, trees and waterfalls. His first profession while he was in art school was as a rock musician himself, and has since frequently demonstrated his musical prowess. The artist began working on his “Gods of Rock Festival” series in 2014, creating the works out of his own experience with rock music. Du Kun often paints the four elements of earth, water, air and fire, and puts them in mysterious atmospheres that creates a mystic, misty air. In one of his early paintings “Who Lit Us”, there are candle-shaped buildings melting in the middle of a city, a horrifying and yet beautiful image just like the rock stars depicted in his Tokyo exhibit. The five musicians’ faces in this series are comprised of Buddhist temples and other traditional Chinese architectural structures, treating his subjects as if they were divine creatures overlooking sacred lands.

DU Kun’s “Revels of the Rock Gods” is now on view at Mizuma Art Gallery in Tokyo, Japan through February 13rd, 2016.    & thanks Colossal

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