mixing-patterns

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[Image description: four photos of a woman standing outdoors in front of a tall, leafy hedge, two full-length shots and two three-quarters. She is white and has dark brown hair, short on the sides and worn curly off to one side on top. She wears glasses with tortoiseshell and clear frames. She wears plum-colored slim-cut pants, a floral sleeveless top, and grey flats with blue hearts over the toes. In two photos, she wears rain gear including a blue rain jacket with white raindrops and umbrellas and holds an umbrella with pastel-colored geometric designs.]

Rain’s not that hard to deal with when your rain gear is this adorable!

Shirt: Made by me | Pants: Old Navy | Shoes: Nordstrom Rack | Umbrella: Gap | Jacket: Macys

I never understood the “Don’t judge a book by its cover” sentiment.  As a kid, I remember thinking to myself, I thought that’s what book covers were for? They’re the first thing potential readers see when they’re browsing and they’re the subject of many an *intellectual* Instagram shot. But most importantly, artists work hard to make sure book covers reflect  what’s inside of them.

As the NPR Books intern, my hands end up on a lot of brand new titles, which also have brand new covers. So this summer, I’m going to be tumbling about book cover art and artists in a series I’m calling #bookcovercrush.

First up: Luiza Sauma’s Flesh and Bone and Water, which was designed by cover artist Lauren Peters-Collaer. The novel follows a wealthy Brazilian teenager who finds himself drawn to the family maid’s beautiful daughter after travelling to the mouth of the Amazon.

Peters-Collaer says, “First, I explored mixing painted patterns with natural elements of the Brazilian landscape to convey the tropical setting and lush, layered feeling of the narrative.”

“At the same time, I was interested in incorporating an obscured female visual to reference the woman who is a catalyst for the story, and who is increasingly illuminated throughout the course of the text.”

“These two ideas came together in the final cover”:

Be sure to watch out for next installment of #bookcovercrush!

-Intern Sydnee

Images courtesy of  Lauren Peters-Collaer and Scribner

Steven, 23

”My style inspirations are David Bowie, David Sylvian, Ryuichi Sakamoto. Styles I like: bold colors with some architectural interest, high waists, sharp collars, New Wave androgyny, pattern mixing, glam with some malevolence, tweed, colorful fustiness.”

Apr 12, 2017 ∙ Union Square

but listen to this: luna lovegood cuddled inside her own weasley sweater. molly knows to make it a few sizes too big because luna loves to wrap the sleeves like a scarf around ginny’s neck. and she even sows on random patches of material of all different colors. mixing patterns and adding cute little star patches or hearts to the front. luna and ginny trying to squeeze into one sweater. molly sowing a little star onto ginny’s sweater to match luna. i cant deal with this.

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[Image description: two photos of a woman standing outdoors in front of a tall, leafy hedge, one a full-length shot and the other three-quarters. She is white and has dark brown hair, short on the sides and worn curly off to one side on top. She wears glasses with frames that are tortoiseshell on top and clear, pink-tinted plastic on bottom. She wears a wool, tartan blazer in mossy green, light blue, and teal, a buttoned waistcoat in navy blue plaid, a floral chambray shirt in light blue, green trousers, and knee-high boots.]

Please forgive me if I throw all the patterns on at once; sometimes I just can’t help myself!

Blazer: LL Bean | Vest: Made by me | Shirt: Old Navy | Pants: Old Navy | Boots: Avenue | Pocket square: Liberty

Okay, so @stanchez-sloppy-seconds pretty much inspired me to make my own Rick. I absolutely love their Ricardo and I kinda wanted to give designing a Rick a try.

So this is C-821 Rick, aka Runway Rick. He’s a male model as well as a genius, but likes to keep up with the latest fashions more than he does going on adventures with his Morty. Half the time he’s criticizing his grandson’s fashion choices–which are honestly bad. Plaid with paisley? Come on Morty, you can’t just mix patterns willy-nilly!

TATTOO STYLES

Tattoos are an art form. And to me, art is creativity. So no list will ever be complete, until there will be someone out there working on something new. But this (a rewriting of an old piece I wrote for ET on tumblr) can help to know a little bit more about modern tattoo styles. Take your time to understand the differencies, go through the names in the list, find your style. A good tattoo lasts forever, and knowledge is the roots of a good choice.

Old School/Traditional: Is usually referred to American classic tattooing. Artists like Amund Dietzel, Sailor Jerry, Herbert Hoffman or Bert Grimm, from the firtst decades of 1900, are the names to start from if you want to know its roots, Classical subjects (anchors, ships, roses, daggers, eagles, horses etc.), simple designs, bold lines and  basic color palettes. Traditional tattooing is definitely more than a trend, with its own philosophy and unwritten rules.

Tony Nilsson, Cassandra Frances, Samuele Briganti, Paul Dobleman, Paul Fulton, Florian Santus, Moira Ramone (pics: Moira Ramone, Paul Fulton, Mauro Quaresima)

There is also a different kind of traditional, widly diffused, enough to be considered a style, that people keep considering part of traditional or neo traditional. It keeps bold lines, and part of the classic imaginery, mixed with weird, modern, surreal, pop stuff. No limits for color palettes, no rules. Tradition meets creativity, one of the personal favourites.

El Carlo, Ron Wells, Luca Font, Pietro Sedda, Ray Wallace, Dane Mancini, Laura Yahna, Ibi Rothe, Deno Jr (pics: Ray Wallace, El Carlo, Laura Yahna, Dane Mancini)

Japanese: Originally called Irezumi, its roots runs deep in the history of its country. Its meaning in Japanese culture changed through the centuries, from tebori (tattooing by hand) to Yobori (tattooing by machine), to became part of the classic Japanese imaginaery, as we know it. Not every asian themed tattoo (common subjects like dragons, yokai demons, tigers, hannya masks and so on) is japanese style. Everything from colors to placement, to the shapes of the untattooed areas has its rules. As any other ancient styles, of course, you can find its modern, contaminated, version too (Gakkin or Wendy Pham’s works are a good example).  

Shige, Pino Cafaro, Caio Pinero, Bill Canales, Gotch, Rodrigo Souto, Yutaro (Bill Canales, Pino Cafaro, R. Souto, Shigenori Ywasaki)

Modern tribal and ornamental: usually referred to a mix of geometrical shapes, patterns, mandalas, asian motives, and Maori influences.

Guy le tatooer, Thomas Hooper, Marco Galdo, Chaim Machlev, Little Swastika (Guy, C. Machlev, T. Hooper)

Realism: From portraits, to a custom piece, to the perfect reproduction of a picture/painting. Realistic tattoos is one of the most spectacular styles in tattooing. No black outline, and lifelike shades, black and grey or colors. It easily mixes with different styles, like with Simone Pfaff or Andrey Lukovnikov, where realism is just a technical part of their own style.

Robert Hernandez, Chris Gherman, Alex De Pase, Scrappy Uno, Sandra Daukshta, Lippo, Sam Stokes (Lippo, A. Acosta, S. Daukshta)

Biomechanical: A trend in the late 90’, basically made of mechanical parts that looks like fused with the flesh. Organic and unorganic elements are realistically drawn, to create the illusion to be carved in the onwer’s body.

Don McDonald, Carson Hill, Guy Hatchinson (who creates bio organic style) (itp: Carson Hill, Don McDonald, Guy Atchinson)

New School/Cartoonish: Fantasy, big eyes subjects, rounded shapes, bright colors, crazy proportions and prospectives. Another style that was more popular in the 90’, now is often fused with different styles, specially with neo traditional.

Kati Berinkey (she fuses new school and sketchy/illustrative styles for her designs), Adam Hawtorne (another one with his own distintcive illustrative style), David Tevenal, Nathan Evans (mixing neo trad e new school) (A. Hawtorne, A. H., David Tevenal)

Neo Traditional: Illustrative like tattoos, where classical subjects like women, crows, snakes, triangles, wolves etc. (from the classic old school imaginery), are drawn with bright colors, and realistical shading, in a aperfect mix between traditional and realism.

Emily Rose, Dusty Neal, Lu’s Lips, Christophe Bonardi, Debora Cherrys, Rodrigo Kalaka El Uf, Jack Goks Pearce. (E. R. Murray, R. Kalaka, Teresa Sharpe, Lu’s Lips)

Lettering: Text tattoos are usually a bad idea, unless they are done in the proper style, and from a specialized artist.

Norm Will Rise, Justin Wilson, Big Meas (N. W. R., J. Wilson, Big Meas)

Chicano: the word “Chicano”, referred to American citizen of Mexican origin, ceased to be a slur in the 60’, while the style itself was born a couple decades before. Common subjects are wemen, skulls, roses, and religious icons, usually in black and gray.

Boog, Macko (Macko, Boog)

These are the most common, radicated, worldly reconized style. But is just a partial view of what the contemporary tattoo scene can offer. In the last 15 years, more and more styles are born. Some of them still don’t even have a name, some have more than one. Some of them will became classic and some are just a trend.

Fun fact: wikipidia’s italian “tattoo” page have “genital” listed as one of the most common styles.

Watercolors: The colors are spread to simulate watercolors. Often mixed with other styles. People keeps debating about how watercolor tattoos will age. Only time will tell.

Klaim, Amanda Wachob, Niko Inko (A. Wachob, G. Smash, Klaim)

Photoshop: the names probably comes from a folder where the artist Xoil (still one of the best in this style) used to store his works’ pics.

If you have ever used PS, you know what I’m talking about. PS style is basically a collage of different images and techniques, from watercolor to dotwork to lettering.

Xoil, Niko Inko, Voller Kontrast, Little Swastika, Jef Palumbo, Arlin ffrench (J. Palumbo, Xoil)

Illustrative Geometrical style: geometrical elements are common in modern tattoo designs, but some artists  generated a new trend, mixing illustrative elements, modern tribal patterns, and geometrical lines.

Maxime Buchi, Daniel Meyer, Valentin Hirsch, Kamil Czapiga  (C. Machlev, D. Meyer, Maxime Buchi) 

Illustrative, sketchy: The artist draw on skin all the lines that usually are ereased in a finished design, to create the illusion of a pencil sketch.

Lea Nahon, Sam Rulz, Nomi Chi, Sven Groenvald (Lea Nahon, S. Groenvald, Nomi Chi)

3D: Again, not exactly a style.  The artist uses realistic shading, shadows and prospectives to give the illusion of depth.

Russ Abbott, Jesse Rix (itp: Jesse Rix, Russ Abbott)

Engraving: on a thin line between illustrative, sketchy, and traditional tattoos, engraving uses black lines to simulate ancient wood engraving techniques, taking inspiration from medieval like illustration.

Sam Rulz, Maxime Buchi, Andrei Svetov (A. SV, Sam Rulz)

Next style has no name yet, and it’s slightly less diffused.. But I like it, so it’s in the list. ;) Tipical traditional pieces but coloured with flat colors, almost no shades, and twisted, experimental, original designs. 

Adrian Edek, Sany Kim, Aivaras Lee, Patryk Hilton

Girly: It’s a definition I hate, cause I’m convinced there is no room for sex differencies in art. I’m a big bearded boy and still I would proudly wear a Jody Dawber or Cassandra Frances’ piece. Still, this is how people call it. Bold lines and flat shading are mixed with bright colors like pink, yellow, light blue, that perfectly fits the “cuteness” of the subjects, often inspired from pop culture and cartoon characters.

Jody Dawber (basically a traditional artist), Alex Strangler, Sasha Mezoghlian (A. Strangler, J. Dawber, S. Mezoghlian)

The last style of this list have no name yet, but it’s still worth to be considered cause of it’s diffusion and people response to it. Basically the artists recreates a simpler, geometrical, version of the subjects, with no black outline, and a watercolor effect.

Sasha Unisex, Marius Trubisz, Marcin Surowiec, David Cote (M. Surowiec, Sasha Unisex)

gryffinclaw394  asked:

You know what bothers me? The fact that in the original Harry Potter movies wizards wear "stereotypical" wizard fashion (robes, hats, etc.), but in Fantastic Beasts they wear (mostly) what any regular 1920's person would wear. Doesn't that get you? It's such a tiny detail but it takes away from the illusion of the world. I've tried to come up with some "explanation", but idk what to say.

This gets super in depth, so pardon my geekiness and keep reading if you’re interested in my wizard fashion breakdown :)

 -Caitlin (Ravenclaw)

Keep reading

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[Image description: two photos of a woman standing outdoors in front of a tall, leafy hedge, one a full-length shot and the other three-quarters. She is white and has dark brown hair, short on the sides and worn curly off to one side on top. She wears glasses with tortoiseshell and clear frames. She wears a floral button-front shirt with a blue and white seersucker vest, dark-wash skinny jeans, and light grey saddle shoes with pink laces.]

Summertime dapper! Hard to pull off in the heat but so worth it.

Vest: Made by me | Shirt: Uniqlo | Jeans: Old Navy | Shoes: GH Bass