mixing technique

How to Use Eyeshadow as Eyeliner

There are hundreds of different makeup products on the market, but the question you may be asking yourself is “do I really need all of them?” If you’ve ever been tempted to try a bright blue eyeliner but haven’t wanted to purchase one or if you just don’t wear black liner very often the great news is that you can just use your eyeshadow, and there are two ways how.

Keep reading

I found a cool new way to value rough!  Layer two copies of a pencil sketch on top of one another, the top one’s values adjusted so that the paper color is white and the pencil sketch almost black, and the bottom one left untouched (gray, like all pencil scans look).  Set the top one to multiply; leave the bottom one as normal, but mask out the parts that are supposed to be white (or erase the parts that are supposed to be white if you’re brave).  Then, layer a digital texture (mine’s from lost and taken) in between the two, set to multlply and again mask out the parts that are white – et voila! A fairly decent ink wash comparison.  Plus it took all of three seconds to do, hurray!

Sorry, just had to share this technique.  I’ll be inking this guy later this month hopefully…

EDIT:  This works best if the original pencil drawing had a decent range of values in it to begin with – so a drawing you made with soft lead!  Anyway, try it out if you’d like!

10

BurntPasta’s Flipnote Studio 3D Color Mixing Tutorial!

I do my best to showcase how I mix colors using different colors and brush textures/fill textures~

*COLOR LAYERING IS THE KEY <3*

A lot of my color combinations were created by experimenting. Sometimes something would start off green with a layer of white using the first texture with a layer of blue on top using one of the later textures and I would end up making a lighter turquoise color.. 

I encourage everyone who animates or even just ‘arts’ in general on flipnote to experiment with all kinds of color combinations! :3 

For example: The best grey is actually created with the checker pattern brush of yellow on bottom, blue on top! (or vice versa!) It can be seen on the mettaton ex doodle seen above! Using white on black kind of creates a harsher grey that does not look metallic at all and blends in too much with the black outlines..

Another example is using Red on Green in the checker pattern brush creates a warm brown… Perfect for trees, monster kid stripes, or even hair color!

I tend to create the colors on the character first and then go back with either of the stripe pattern brushes with black to create shading since it allows both of the under-colors show through… But for high-lights, I prefer to use the checker brush and paint on white. ^^

Always remember that the more spaced out your brush is, the more you will see colors on lower layers, so you do a lot more mixing because of this! 

~~~~~
I would like to take a second to thank the anon who asked ‘how I color with Flipnote’ that prompted this tutorial! <3 

I’ve been meaning to do one for a while now, but I’ve never done a full-fledged tutorial before… ^^; 

I HOPE THIS HELPS! <3

PS: My favorite colors to make in flipnote are the purple made with red and blue and the checker brush, and turquoise made the same way with blue and green. lawl. >3<


based on a scene from this perfectly perfect modern Steve and Bucky au where Steve sees Bucky for the first time (sort of) after they’ve just been texting ever since Steve messaged a wrong number

Today’s Best Tips on Music Production

10 essential tips… 20 mistakes… 30 production secrets and so on, such lists seem to be really popular these days. Although many of them are just full of crap. Especially forget about the longer checklists – even if you could find some good advices there, most tips are just nonsense, like “don’t mix bass with headphones”.

Anyway, to you aspiring producer, here’s a few things I think you should care about:

  • Limiting yourself can help drive creativity. Don’t use all of your instrumental arsenal at once, don’t try to cover all music styles in one track.
  • Listen to different styles of music and try to identify what you like and what you dislike.
  • Analyze your favorite artists’ work in great detail. Theorize with both feet on the ground.
  • Go ahead and copy other artists, but don’t settle there – tweak and add your own style and flavor.
  • Cover, remix and remake your favorite tracks, it’s a good and fun way to learn about music.
  • Use reference tracks, compare your shit to others, but don’t get paralyzed when your track doesn’t bang as loud as them.
  • Learn about synthesis and learn how to sound design different kind of instruments, e.g. strings, plucks, percussion (make synthetic drums using waveforms, a noise generator, filters, envelopes and such).
  • Check your music productions on several systems; from high-end studio monitor speakers to iPhone earbuds.
  • Sleep on it. Let your track mature over night and return to it with fresh ears.
  • Go hardware, get tactile if you are growing tired of a software-based environment. To actually play an instrument or to turn a real knob is really something else.
  • Get inspiration from collaborations with other artists. Just reach out to people you admire – this is globalization, this is the time of teh internetz.
  • Try to keep passionate about creating music, but don’t be afraid to make some demands of yourself, just to push things forward.
About Drum EQ

Firstly everybody would tell you to have a minimalistic approach towards EQ-ing and to cut rather than to boost. They would say that subtractive EQ avoids adding unnecessary gain to the signal and such. But by doing so, you might need to increase the volume of the instrument you’re working on, because cuttings are essentially lowering the gain.

That was the first tip, and now there are a few frequency ranges that you should pay attention to.

Kick Drum

Usually you’d like the kick drum to have both a thick bass thump from the low-end and a driving click from the mids. So to add some extra weight (that is low-end punch or bottom depth), boost at 50-150 Hz. Don’t overdo it as it can clutter up the low-end. And don’t boost the extremely low frequencies as this will mostly cause a muddy sound. If possible, use bell mode on the EQ to better isolate the frequencies.

To reduce boom, or tighten and clean up the low-end in general, set a high-pass filter around 50-60 Hz. (20 Hz and below only adds unnecessary energy to the total sound.)

If the kick drum needs more body, boost some in the 90-120 Hz range.

Apply cut somewhere in the 150-600 Hz range to treat muddiness, while boxiness is most prominent near 400 Hz. Also apply a notch filter at 250 Hz, that can add thump or slap attack to the kick drum.

Push between 2-4 kHz to add attack, and also boost a bit between 4-7 kHz to make the kick drum snappy.

Remove extreme high (for a kick drum you shouldn’t need anything over 10 kHz) and low frequencies (at least kill everything below 20 Hz) with a high- and a low-pass filter.

Snare

You can, more or less, use the the same tips as for the kick drum above with a few changes and additions.

Cut at 80 Hz to remove rumble.

If the snare sounds thin, boost at 125-150Hz for a little weight and a full snare sound. And to give the snare some punch, boost around 250 Hz.

The body of the snare should be around 500 Hz, adding there will give a rounder sound.

Boost around 2 kHz for some crispy edge and add at 2.5 kHz for extra snap and attack. Also add clarity and even more punch by boosting around the 3 kHz area.

You might want to give the snare some air and presence by raising somewhere between 6-15 kHz, like at 10 kHz.

Hand claps and rim shots can mostly be treated as snares.

Toms

For the floor tom that needs low-end fulness, add some at 80-100 Hz, and for the smaller rack tom lift somewhere closer to 250 Hz.

Increase thump and add attack around 250 Hz.

Cut the mids around 400 Hz to reduce boxiness.

Add attack by boosting between 4-7 kHz (depending on the size of the tom).

Hihats and Cymbals

When you’re done mixing the volume level of the hihats, you usually don’t really have to boost or cut anything. Still, the clank or gong sound is around 200 Hz, but if you want definition, then roll off everything below 500-600 Hz using a high-pass filter. By doing so, you clear out low-end information that is nonessential for the hihat.

If the hihat is sounding thin, boost around 400-800 Hz.

Cut at 1 kHz to remove jangling, and treat clangy sounds by cutting between 1-4 kHz.

A small boost with a wide Q at the 3 kHz range will add presents to the hihat.

Add brightness and get sizzle by lifting at 10 kHz. And if the sound is too harsh, then make a high-shelf cut around 16 kHz.

That’s it. Next time I’ll guide you through the creation of synthesized drums.

Note: processing sampled sounds can turn hihats pretty harsh, therefore use a de-esser to affect the problem frequencies without messing with the overall volume or clarity.