mixed genders

Worldbuilding: Things That Might Have Been Missed

These are the miscellaneous questions I didn’t put anywhere else.  Things that didn’t get enough questions to have its own post, or things I didn’t think of too much until the end.  In this post, I have written a list questions of … . well, everything else?

Have fun, be detailed and creative, and by all means come up with questions that are not asked.

Because my computer ate everything, these questions are not directly taken from the NaNoWriMo website.  Some are asked from memory, some are questions that sounded like ones I had, and others are ones I came up with.

How is a funeral held?

What happens to the body after someone has died?
Do they bury it?  Place it in a tomb?  Cremate it?  Drop it to the bottom of the sea?  Send it down the river?  Toss it into a dragon’s lair?

How do people mourn?

What is consider an appropriate amount of time for mourning?

What color is used for mourning and funerals?
Black?  White?  Red?  Blue?  No specific color?  What does the color symbolize?

Are there any coming of age rituals?

What happens during a coming of age ritual?

What age is the child normally at when he or she goes the coming of age ritual?

Does it vary by gender?

What kind of jobs exist?

Which jobs are held in high esteem?

Which jobs are despised?

How do people get jobs?
Do they become an apprentice?  Do they need work experience?  A college degree?  How are they offered jobs?  Do they apply?  Talk with the owner?  Get recommended?

What jobs are influenced by magic?

What is the most common way someone meets his or her future spouse?
By growing with them?  Through connections?  School?  In the market?  At a dance?  Arranged marriage?

How technologically advanced is the world?

What is the latest piece of technology?

How does magic affect technology?

How is new technology viewed?
Is it embraced?  Are people apprehensive?  Do they outright spurn new technology?  Do people care?

What does the average bed look like?
Straw mattress?  Water bed?  A pile of blankets?  A wooden platform?  A chair?  A couch?

What are some rules regarding sleep?
Are mixed genders allowed or is that frowned upon unless they’re married?  Do people have their own beds or share with siblings?  Do the rules vary depending on where they’re sleeping?  Is everyone smooshed in together at an inn?  Can money get better bedding?

What are the basic pieces of furniture found in an average house?
Chairs?  Couches? Tables?  Beds?  Bookshelves?  How many are acceptable?  How many pieces of furniture would indicate lavishness?

What are some toys for children?

What do people use as a light source when the sun is not available?

What kinds of dishes are used?
Plates?  Bowls?  Cups or glasses?

What kind of eating utensils do people use?
Chopsticks?  Forks and spoons?  Their hands?

What materials are dishes and eating utensils made of?

What kind of items are used for cooking?
Pots and pans?  Clay pots?  Crock pots?  Skillets?  Wok?  A wooden plate?

AMAB nonbinary people are awesome. 

AMAB nonbinary people who identify and present masculinely are still nonbinary and still awesome.

AMAB nonbinary people who identify and present femininely are still nonbinary and still awesome.

AMAB nonbinary people who have no gender, a big mix of gender, or have no idea about their gender, are still nonbinary and still awesome

AMAB nonbinary people are so awesome. 

Juchitán is a colonial town that predates the Spanish conquest. Home to the indigenous culture of the Zapotec, a third gender known as muxe (MOO-shey) – said to derive from “mujer,” the word for “woman” in Spanish – has long flourished here. The muxe gender encompasses a range of identities that are between the male-female binary. While a muxe would have different labels to choose from in the U.S. – “trans woman,” “gay man,” “genderqueer” – “muxe” spans all identities between male and female here. The term is unique to the Zapotec.

Stemming from pre-Columbian societies that had “mixed-genders” outside of male and female, the muxes are analogous to other “two-spirit” identities in indigenous populations of North America. Muxes traditionally have the freedom to dress in women’s clothing, wear cosmetics and grow their hair long. They can be seen wearing the traditional Tehuana costume of the region, a two-part gown made up of a huipil – a shirt with colorful embroidery – and a long skirt that usually matches the top. Called muxes vestidas – “dressed muxes” – they participate in more traditional female gender roles, such as working as seamstresses, than do muxes pintadas – “painted muxes” – who dress in men’s clothes, but still pluck their eyebrows and wear cosmetics.

When asked why a third gender is accepted in Juchitán, the townspeople invariably point to “the matriarchy” of Oaxacan households – women handle the finances of the family, since they’re the ones who work as vendors in the marketplace, giving them more of an equal standing with men than elsewhere in the countryside. Many mothers would sooner force an unaccepting husband to leave the house than kick out a muxe child.

Location: Juchitán, Oaxaca, Mexico

Photographer: Shaul Schwarz

Humans are Space Orcs

I jumped onto the train for awhile now but now I have to contribute to it in some way.

Teens.

I ain’t talking about the stereotypical teens that adults always talk about, I’m talking about the dorks that still laugh at the iCUP joke.
But like…aliens don’t know how teens are because all they have heard from adults is how stupid and immature teens could be.
“Their rebellious and they won’t appreciate a single thing you do for them.” Human Rachel growled. “I wouldn’t want them as part of the crew.”
“But were you not a ‘teen’ once yourself?” Srytx gurgle, slightly confused.
“Exactly.” She huffed. “So I know how they work. Take it from me, teens aren’t what you want Srtyx.”
From the little warnings the adult humans have given the aliens makes them all worry as inevitably they are forced to harbor the human teens as well.
There were many things Gypr was afraid of, but this had his pelt flash blue in worry. If the humans were warning them about their own kin was not something that stirred well in his glands.
He shook his head and walked into the room that harbored the teens and two adults.
Some were as small as 4 ft while others simply towered over most adults. They all seemed dissinterested, some of the females talking in a corner while the males were being annoyingly loud. There were groups of mixed genders and others with only a single gender.
Gypr let our a shrill whistle between his fangs causing the humans present to turn to him. The two adults looked severely unconfortable which was understandable, his species did not give off peaceful vibes they were predatory by nature.
“Welcome humans,” Gypr announced. “Human adults will you please go in through that door they have a conference there for the human adults alone. Many of our other humans have said it is best to seperate the youth from them.”
The two adults nodded and turned to give biting glares at the teens. Some payed close attention while the other sniffed and turned away.
“Don’t cause trouble.” The human male growled before they both walked off into the room.
Gypr was slightly confused, they were not very friendly with each other.
As soon as the door closed, Gypr was able to see something…odd.
The loud teens from before continued to make and Crack jokes which eased some of the teens within the group. They positioned themselves to be more of a circle rather than the scattered mess they were in before.
The girls glanced around almost disinterested, but Gypr could see that they were looking for something.
Two teens stepped forward, one a male and the other a female.
The male bowed while the female gave a nod of her head.
“It’s a pleasure to meet you.” The male smiled when he rose.
“Sup dude.” The female echoed. “I’m Angel and this is my friend Stan, we were informed that you’d be helping us out till we moved onto another ship?”
“Yes of Course I am Gypr,” the alien hummed. “I was told by several humans that you do not obey simple rules, I must inform you that anyone that breaks the rules will be punished by the other humans as the captain sees fit.”
“Oh the adults told you that hu?” Human Angel snorted. “Of course they would, stupid ass adults don’t know what the hell their talking about.”
“What my friend means,” Stan interjected. “Is that we understand the implications given, and I assure you no one in our crew will step out of line.”
Gypr, slightly confused, nodded. He started to walk, knowing that the humans would follow.
“Hey Gypr,” Human angel raced to stand next to him. “I have a few questions, and I was hoping you’d be able to answer them.”
“Of course anything you need Human angel.”
Angel stood in front of him stopping them from moving any further.
“You are going to show us our rooms right?”
“That was the plan Human angel.”
“Are we going to be situated with any of the adults?”
“Yes unfortunately we do not have rooms for every single person, so we Andre forced to compromise. Their are ten people to a room Human angel.”
“Are we allowed to choose who we go with and who goes with the adults?”
“The captain nor the humans malentioned any rooming arrangements so I assume it is fine, unless situated otherwise. There are 30 of you we have two open rooms for 10 each but the others will be scattered with human adults.”
Gypr was expecting anger and fighting amongst the group. But Human angel and human Stan only nodded.
“Okay that’s good,” Human Stan grinned. “Are we forced to do any activities with adults?”
“No, adults mentioned that they would not get any work done with younglings like yourself in the immediate vicinity, so you will not interact with any adults unless you so desire.”
Gypr was surprised when about eight of the teens sobbed in relief, earning pats and hugs from their other humans. Gypr surprise and confusion must have shown as Human Stan came to explain.
“Some of us have had bad run in with adults, they treat us like kids and in turn brush us aside, however their are a few of us who have been wronged by adults and we wish to keep them as far apart as possible.” Human Stan explained. “Adults categorize us a certain way because they believe that they know what is best despite us being perfectly capable of making our own decisions. Not all of us are like that, but in my group we try our bests. Please exuse me and angel as we wish to comfort our friends.”
Human Stan bowed again before racing off to hold one of his shaking male friends.
“Human Angel, I was unaware that Human Adults did not treat all you’d fairly.” Gypr was slightly horrified.
Angel shrugged.
“Trust us, some of us were the same way. It took forever to realize what’s wrong with our crew, and we can’t really do much about it either. There are a lot of humans that do not understand the precious life that we hold and will often abuse it as they wish. It is not only human adults who do this, but Human elderly, teens and children as well.” Human Angel sighed miserably, a sound that Gypr was told teens do not make. “Everything is so jacked up Gypr, but we learn to deal with what we have. I promise you we will try our best to not cause any trouble but please note that if push comes to shove we will probably be yelling at the other human adults aboard. It is not out of rebellion but we are all tired of the way we are treated arena as such arguments happen.”
Gypr stood staring at her with his three eyes, he would need to update the manual on human teens.
He stood staring as the human teens eventually calmed each other down and we’re ready to start moving once again.
“You have not mentioned to called you only by name Human Angel and Human Stan, most other Humans are irritated by being called Human before their name.” Gypr rumbled as they stopped for lunch.
“Not all of us are like that.” Human Stan supplied. “But if it makes you feel more comfortable calling us that way, by all means go ahead. Just remember some human won’t always appreciate the way you speak.”
Gypr looked down as his meal, his pelt flashing green as he calmed himself.
Human teens were most mesmerizing.

7

For post 3000, I thought it would be nice to finally finish the bigender comic I’ve been working on since… before I started this blog. So here it is!

Description:

Panel 1: Round smiley face that’s green on the right side and purple on the left. To the right is another face with irregular patches of purple and green. Captions read “Bigender people can feel split in two, or with two genders all mixed together”.

Panel 2: Face colored a blend of green and purple. To the right is another face with rectangular patches of green, purple, and the blend. Below are two faces, one with purple filling the lower third of the left side and green on the right side, and one that is mostly green with purple at the top. Captions read “The genders can be almost indistinguishable, or feel like they correspond to different mindsets, or be different strengths”

Panel 3: Purple face with an arrow pointing to a green face on the right. To the right is a face with purple filling the lower third of the left side and green on the right side. Below is a sequence of three faces directed with arrows: the first face is mostly green with purple at the top, the second face is mostly purple with green at the bottom, and the third face is mostly white with purple on the left and green on the right at the bottom. Captions read “Bigender people can switch between genders, or have a completely static gender, or have the strength of the genders change”

Panel 4: “The genders can be female, male, agender, polygender, or whatever else the person feel fits each part. What all bigender people have in common is they are TWO genders. Not just one or another; BOTH”. Gender signs are above each corresponding gender identity.

Panel 5: Bigender people can use any pronouns. Above is a speech bubble with many pronoun sets in different fonts.

Panel 6: A green stick figure with a face that is partially purple on the left and green on the right. To the right are two stick figures with a double-ended arrow between them, one green and one purple, each with a face that is purple on the left and green on the right. Captions read “A bigender person may choose to present as one gender, or switch back and forth”

Panel 7: Two stick figures, one green and purple, the other pink. Each has a face that is mostly purple with green on the bottom. Captions read “or present as a mixture, or something else entirely. But remember: Gender =/= Presentation, and they are always still bigender”

ree-fireparrot  asked:

How realistic or unrealistic are battle couples, provided they have sufficient mental discipline? Is it even realistic to have two people working together to fight the same opponent hand-to-hand, or is focusing on both your opponent and your partner too much? What if one person is a distraction (by fighting the opponent head-on) so the other person can stab them in the back, so to speak? Is that too risky?

You’re asking a lot of questions here and most of them have absolutely nothing to do with having a romantic relationship with your working partner.

Some things first:

1) The relationship between a battle couple and any platonic working partnership are not really any different in most cases except that they share a romantic relationship.

2) You don’t need a functional or professional partnership or partnership at all to fight in a group or gang up on an individual.

3) Fraternization just as often falls into casual sex as it does a romantic relationship, if not more often.

4) Almost none of what you’re asking has to do with romance.

Falling in love on the battlefield happens, it happens a lot. Combat is a high stress environment and people are people. Just because something isn’t a good idea or is unprofessional doesn’t mean it won’t happen, it just means you’ve got an added benefit of complications.

Some people can handle romantic relationships with an SO who also engages in combat, even one who engages in combat with them. Those are the ones who can compartmentalize between being on the battlefield and being off it. However, if they can’t (there is a very good possibility that they can’t) then it becomes a real problem. When they can’t handle the stress or the distraction, if they can’t put the romance aside, then their relationship puts everyone at risk, including their mission.

When you’re fighting, especially with a goal in mind, one person’s life cannot be more important than the mission.

It takes a significant amount of trust for a battle couple to function because their romantic partner cannot afford to jump in and save them when things start going sideways. Both participants need to be the kind of people that when the choice is between their partner or the mission, they choose the mission.

This concept is one that’s very difficult to grasp if you’re setting out to write a romance, because most of the normal steps you’d take to fulfill that romance will leave the battle couple hamstrung and unable to function. You can’t have the guy or girl jumping in to save their guy or girl when it looks like they’re about to die, they have to trust their partner to save themselves.

That is hard.

This is a very difficult state to handle emotionally. Imagine, you are at risk of losing your loved one at all times and you can’t do a damn thing about it. You can’t obsess or brood over it, because you can’t afford that kind of distraction. Whether they’re right in front of you or on a battlefield somewhere else, you can’t think about it. You’ve got to focus on keeping yourself alive, because that keeps everyone else alive, and by doing what you can you help to ensure the survival of both your loved one and your team. You’ve got to do your job, even when you’re about to lose everything you ever gave a damn about and its within your power to stop it.

A true battle couple is one who exists in complete equality, trust, and partnership with their significant other on the battlefield. They keep a cool head and a cool heart while in the midst of gut wrenching emotional turmoil. They don’t baby, they don’t hover, they don’t keep a careful eye on, and they don’t obsess until the fighting’s over. They don’t sacrifice their own life or their own body to keep their lover from getting injured. They don’t break position.

If they do any of the above, they will both die and so will anyone who is relying on them. If you are writing characters where the relationship is more important than the mission, more important than the team, more important than surviving the fight in front them then you have, narratively speaking, a serious problem.

This is not a bad one to have in a story or an unrealistic one in life, romantic relationships on the battlefield are built around this concept, but it does need to be addressed. If its not, tragedy strikes.

If you’re writing a battle couple, you need two characters who when faced with the choice between saving their loved one and stopping the bomb from blowing up downtown Manhattan, they pick the bomb.

And, in fiction, that’s not normally what love is.

It also has to be both of them, they both need this very specific outlook to function while in combat together. If one has it, but the other doesn’t then tragedy strikes. If neither have it, tragedy strikes. They need to be on the same page.

The reason why the military and other combat groups prohibit fraternization is because romantic relationships inevitably fuck everything up. If they can handle it, great. However, the all to likely outcome, for either one or both parties involved, is they can’t.

They’ll do it anyway though, because people are people.

When you engage in violence, that violence and training separates you from the general population. You’ve been through experiences that most people cannot comprehend or relate to and that makes maintaining relationships difficult. There’s a lot to be said for being in a relationship with someone of similar background, who can empathize with your experiences, who has been through what you’ve been through. You don’t need to look much further than the rate of divorce among the FBI or CIA to understand just how difficult maintaining a relationship in an incredibly stressful environment is.

As humans, we crave having a partner we can relate to. With whom we can share our secrets. Who won’t judge us for the terrible things we’ve done. When you have to rely on each other for survival, attraction, desire, even love becomes easy. It’s often a false sense of connection built on desperation, one which if born inside the environment won’t function outside of it, but that doesn’t mean it feels any less real.

When you might die tomorrow, sometimes you just want to feel something, anything at all, and that’s where the causal sex comes in.


Casual Sex:

In mixed gender units, casual sex is really common. Not romantic relationships, mind. It’s just sex, and it doesn’t go any further than that. It’s desperation, it is all about sensation, and a reminder for the participants that they are alive.

When dealing with these types of relationships in your fiction, its important to remember that the emotional component is neither needed nor wanted. They’re not looking for comfort. They’re looking for sensation, to feel something before they (potentially) die.

Because the author controls everything in their fictional world, it can often become difficult to remember and insert qualities like the random chance of dealing with the unknown. We’ve often got characters that are necessary to the plot, who become identified as “safe”, and behave differently because they know they’re going to live through the fight or battle to get to the end of the story.

It becomes important to learn to live in the moment. To live in the twilight hour on the night before a battle, to be unsure, when the character doesn’t know what will happen next. If you don’t then there is a whole array of human emotions, experiences, and terrible choices that you’ll never touch on in your fiction.

If you don’t, you’ll be all the poorer for it.

The Two on One Battle: Real.

You don’t need to be in a relationship, or even particularly well-trained, to accomplish this. Two versus one happens a lot and the pair off usually wins because eight limbs trumps four. One person locks up the individual, the other circles and attacks on vectors they can’t defend from. We’re social animals. Our natural instincts will help us more when we’re fighting in a group as opposed to fighting alone.

1 v Group is a bad situation to be in if you’re the one, and it doesn’t matter how well trained you are. Numbers will kill you.

Part of the reason why you see single characters fighting groups in movies and other fiction is to establish that they’re great fighters. The problem is that this has become so widespread that we now think fighting a group is easier than fighting a single, skilled individual. This is untrue. The group will kill you because the individuals within the group can move onto vectors that cannot be defended.

What your describing in your question in a battle between three people in a two on one is normal behavior, its standard tactics. However, you’re also demonstrating the exact kind of behavior for why two people engaged in a romantic relationship should not be on the battlefield together.

If you’re ever sitting there and wondering if something that is a basic and bog standard tactic is now, suddenly, too dangerous because your characters are dating then that is the exact problem.

Things that are normal suddenly become too risky, and the focus transitions to preserving their lover’s life rather than making use of their significant advantage over their enemy.

That is the exact kind of thinking which will cost them their lives, and for no benefit at all.

Good job.

-Michi

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So recently ive been into a kpop group called KARD, which is unique for its mixed genders….and naturally, i had to draw my ships as an idol group lol. 

Halfway through i realized that their names make the acronym LAME, and i found that absolutely hilarious. So, now it’s their official group name lmao

Bonus:

Levi likes to be a dick

on struggling actors, the $200 pilot, and the queering of blue-collar masculinity on “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”

One of the keys to understanding It’s Always Sunny in Philadlephia is the original pilot – the notorious “$200 pilot.” According to this much-mythologized origin story, the original pilot wasn’t set in Philadelphia at all; it was set in LA, and all the characters were struggling actors. FX agreed to produce the show on the condition that they set it in a different location because nobody cares about struggling actors in LA; Rob McElhenney decided on his own hometown, and thus It’s Always Sunny on Television became It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

This decision, which I’m sure everyone viewed at the time as a mere concession to a minor network note, had HUGE repercussions. To understand why, let’s examine one particular scene: the scene in which Mac first meets and flirts with a trans woman named Carmen.

The original pilot would end up being reshot as the Season 1 episode “Charlie Has Cancer,” and on the surface, the differences between the two versions are minor. The basic arc of the scene is the same in both: Mac starts out transphobic toward Carmen, then immediately softens and warms toward her as she flatters his ego. In the pilot, struggling actor Mac has this exchange with her:

MAC: “Is that a penis in your pants?”
CARMEN: “Yes.”
MAC: “You lied to me.”
CARMEN: “No I didn’t. You lied to me. Pharmaceutical sales? Please! I saw you on that episode of Law and Order.”
MAC: “No, don’t turn this ar–Law and Order?” [beams] “You saw that? Yeah? Really? Did you like…?”
CARMEN: “You were really good, actually.”
MAC: “You think so? I thought I was a little over the top.”

(Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vfkNnBTUrY)

That’s the struggling-actor version. Now see how this scene was rewritten for the Philadelphia version:

MAC: “Is that a penis in your pants?”
CARMEN: “Yes.”
MAC: “You lied to me.”
CARMEN: “No I didn’t. You lied to me. You don’t work out? Please! I’ve seen you at the gym. You’re ripped.”
MAC: “No, don’t turn this around – wait.” [beams] “Really? You think so? I was afraid I was getting a little TOO ripped, you know?”
CARMEN: “No. I like it.”
MAC: “Wow.” [gazes at her, speechless]

What just happened here? In short, Rob/Charlie/Glenn have taken the vanity and insecurity of struggling actors – and instilled it instead in these blue-collar South Philly guys. The switcheroo is simple, but the effect is dramatic and destabilizing. We all know that struggling actors are always performing, always desperate for attention and validation – but suddenly, when you take the struggling-actor element out of the mix, it’s gender itself that becomes a performance. Mac’s goal in the LA version is to be a successful actor; his goal in the Philadelphia version is simply to be a man. All the men on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia (but especially Mac and Dennis) constantly struggle to perform their gender, and when they fall short, the humor comes not from their lack of masculinity, but from the impossible demands of the gendered expectations to which they hold themselves.

I’m sure Rob/Charlie/Glenn weren’t consciously thinking about any of this when they decided to set the show in a bar in Philadelphia. But I believe this is the crucial decision that allowed the show to become everything it is now. I even suspect that Mac would never have become a gay character if the show hadn’t established itself from the beginning as a universe in which gender is malleable and toxic masculinity is a dangerous mirage. This is also why the D.E.N.N.I.S. System reads not as a misogynistic fantasy but as a blistering critique of misogyny and rape culture, and why the character of Dennis Reynolds investigates and satirizes the “ladies’ man” sitcom archetype so devastatingly that I can pretty much never watch How I Met Your Mother ever again.

(You could even make the argument that this is also why It’s Always Sunny has never successfully dealt with the topic of race – because investigating the construct of race isn’t baked into the central premise of the show the way investigating the construct of gender is – but that’s a topic for another day.)

In short: It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, just like Shakespeare, understands that ALL human beings are struggling actors.

anonymous asked:

Do you know any good places for trans people who dont really know what to do as they start their transition..?

Hi there! There are a lot of great organizations and Tumblr’s with good tips, if you check out my trans resources tag you’ll find a bunch of them!

http://profeminist.tumblr.com/tagged/trans-resources

8 Tips for Coming Out as Non-Binary

Trans and Non-Binary Resource Masterpost

http://transstudent.org

http://nonbinary-support.tumblr.com/

Trans Youth Support Network

TransgenderChild.net

TransYouth Family Allies

TransYouthEquality.org

Here’s a masterlist from @transteens101

General resources:

Trans related terminology:

Understanding your gender identity:

Pronouns:

Intersex:

Nonbinary resources:

Two Spirit:

Other Cultural Based Genders:

Transfeminine resources:

Transmasculine resources:

Coming out:

Trans mental health:

Trans advice/resource/discussion blogs and sites:

Hope that helps! Readers, free free to comment / reblog with suggestions, thanks!

Bonjour everybody!

As everybody knows, our dear Monsieur Bonnefoy is a romantic man, and what’s more romantic than calling your lover a thousand things that aren’t their actual name! ♥
Pet names are extremely common in french, you can use them for practically anybody but beware! Some names are adequate for friends but not lovers, young people but not older people, men but not women-

I’ve seen these pet names used wrong in many, many fanfics I’ve read online so I think a bit of a crash course would be good for anybody who writes fic with Francis!

NOTE: French is, like many other romance languages, a gendered language with a grammatical masculine and feminine. French does not have a gender-neutral pronoun (at least, not officially) and thus no gender-neutral way to refer to words. This is important to keep in mind for the sake of grammar alone. Thank you.

1/ The basics

The most used pet name is chéri, which means dear. Mon chéri = my dear. 

Chéri/e is a ‘cuter’ version of the words cher/chère which also mean dear (but can also mean dear as in ‘expensive’- it’s considered a little old-timey or sarcastic to call someone mon cher/ma chère nowadays!)

The most common mistakes people make are mixing up gender-relative pronouns and the gender of the word itself. Chéri is a variable word, meaning it has a feminine; chérie

Mon chérie and ma chéri are both incorrect.

As you may have noticed, there’s a change of pronoun whether the word is masculine or feminine. Mon and ma both mean ‘my’ but are both respectively the male and female possessive pronoun.

2/ Variable/Invariable words

Nouns in french can be variable or invariable, meaning that some of them have an ‘other gender’ equivalent or not! Chéri is variable because it has a female equivalent, chérie (also note: the letter e at the end of a word often denotes the feminine form BUT NOT ALWAYS! ahhhh… French.)

Amour (love) is invariable on this point. Amour is a masculine word with no feminine equivalent, therefore one would always call their lover mon amour regardless of them being a man or a woman.

Mon trésor (my treasure) is masculine, ma puce (my flea) is feminine (I swear it’s used! ;o; ), mon ange (my angel) is masculine, mon cœur (my heart) is also masculine, ma biche (my doe) is feminine, etc…

Animal names as pet names will more often than not have a feminine. Mon loup/ma louve (my wolf) is an example of this. Always check if your preferred animal nickname has a masculine or feminine equivalent!
Some animal names are only used in one form- But that’s anther story.

Anyway, I’m rambling. Let’s get to what we were all here for!

3/ Use of pet names and terms of endearment

For a male lover, Francis would most likely use

  • Mon cher (my dear)
  • Mon chéri (my dear) *
  • Mon amour (my love)
  • Mon cœur (my heart)
  • Mon canard (my duck)
  • Mon trésor (my treasure) *
  • Mon loup (my wolf) [ variant: loulou * (also a diminutive for the name Louis) ]
  • Grand fou (translates to crazy man, supposedly a man who is crazy about you) *
  • Mon étalon (my stallion - with OBVIOUS SEXUAL CONNOTATIONS)
  • Mon beau (my handsome (man) )
  • Mon ours (my bear)

(*) These can be used without the possessive pronoun

For a female lover, Francis would most likely use

  • Ma chère (my dear)
  • Ma chérie (my dear) *
  • Mon amour (my love)
  • Mon cœur (my heart)
  • Mon ange (my angel)
  • Mon trésor (my treasure) *
  • Ma tigresse (my (female) tiger - kind of sexual) *
  • Mon chaton (my kitten) *
  • Ma biche (my doe)
  • Ma belle (my beautiful (girl/woman) )
  • Ma colombe (my dove)
  • Ma poupée (my doll) *

(*) These can be used without the possessive pronoun

For your convenience, here’s a list of terms of endearment that are mostly gender-neutral, regarding the person you use it with.

  • Mon amour (my love)
  • Mon cœur (my heart)
  • Mon ange (my angel)
  • Mon trésor (my treasure)

I’m sure I’ll find others soon enough. Chéri/e can be used verbally since both words are pronounced exactly the same way!

BONUS:

(I wanted an excuse to draw Monmon)

Let me explain to you the use of mon chou.

There is actually no good translation for this word (cauliflower isn’t an accurate equivalent) but it goes in the same vein as chéri. It’s an invariable word which is always masculine regardless of who you use it for.
It can be honest, friendly, loving, motherly- or downright condescending. (think- oh honey…)
Context is always important for this. I personally hc that Monaco uses it a lot for this ambiguity!

That’s all I have for now! I apologise if it was a bit rambly or complicated- but feel free to ask questions in the replies or my askbox!

- APH Ambassador Baguette

@hetaliafandomhub

Nonbinary characters in Steven Universe

Steven Universe has been (rightly) praised for its inclusion of nonbinary gender characters. We live in a world where media almost exclusively presents characters who are men or women (and often treats binary trans people, when they’re even included, as if they are an additional “middle” gender even if they don’t identify that way). So of course, characters who are agender or nonbinary are long overdue and worth celebrating.

HOWEVER.

Steven Universe includes two forms of nonbinary characters, and they both involve aliens. We have Gems who come from space and are largely femme-presenting nonbinary aliens (who use she/her pronouns, but that does not make them female), and we have Fusions whose gender and pronouns are shifted to neutral or undetermined when Steven is included.

While it’s still great to have such a cool science fiction show that’s got nonbinary characters, presenting their nonbinary gender as a consequence of “mixed” genders or extraterrestrial origin subtly associates nonbinary gender with being nonhuman. 

Stevonnie is referred to canonically as “they/them,” and it sets a great example, but we know they are a Fusion of Connie (she/her) and Steven (he/him). 

Smoky Quartz has been referred to as “they” in a context where it was unclear whether it was them or their components being talked about, but given the precedent, I assume Smoky is also they/them: another Fusion of a she/her and a he/him. Fusions of Gems who both use “she/her” are also referred to as she/her, so these pronouns are not reserved for Fusions.

I know several nonbinary, trans, and otherwise gender-atypical people who relate really hard to Stevonnie and/or Smoky, and are thrilled to have this kind of representation. It’s so excellent to see Stevonnie, with their femme-leaning androgyny and their clear attractiveness to guys and girls on the show, developing confidence and never dragging the audience through a Very Special Episode where they feel required to disclose and discuss their gender. They’re worried about other things, but this gender thing? It just is, and people in their life don’t make a big deal out of that part of it. But I think we need more, and I think Steven Universe is just the show to do it.

We currently DO NOT HAVE any known nonbinary characters in the show who are not either aliens or Fusions. If we continue to represent nonbinary characters as having a nonbinary gender only because they’re a mixture of male and female or influenced by nonhuman gender concepts, we’re presenting it as a concept but not as one that might be applicable to someone in the non-magical, non-alien, everyday Earthly world. 

But nonbinary humans are everywhere, and I would love to see someone show up in the show with casually referenced nonbinary representation–so we know this isn’t a gender concept we can only accept in association with fantasy concepts.

What’s interesting is the Steven Universe COMICS are already doing this. First, in Issue 1 of the ongoing comic series begun in early 2017, Steven, Peridot, and Lapis find a baby bird. Steven automatically defaults to they/them pronouns for the bird, and after they argue about the bird’s name for a while, they settle on naming them Susan. 

Susan is a name pretty heavily coded as female in Western society, but they set a great example here by NOT having Steven change to she/her pronouns to refer to the bird just because they have a traditionally feminine name. There is no discussion of what pronouns to use and no justification of this. It’s just there for you to accept, casually, as it should be.

In Issue 2 of the ongoing comic series, we have Stevonnie going to prom with Kiki. There is plenty of weirdness associated with this because Kiki doesn’t know Stevonnie is a Fusion of two kids and they’re both struggling with teen awkwardness that has nothing to do with Stevonnie’s Fusion status, but what’s significant about this is Kiki’s automatic, consistent use of they/them pronouns for Stevonnie when introducing them to her friends. 

Plus, Stevonnie and Kiki use the same dressing room when trying on dresses, try on a variety of clothes (some of which are traditionally gendered either male or female), and don’t completely ignore the issue. 

Kiki asks Stevonnie if they prefer to lead or follow, and that’s a really nice acknowledgment that the expected gender roles have to be redefined for a dance couple like them. 

If you just present a nonbinary character where no one’s ever confused about how to treat them, you’re ignoring programming nearly everyone in our society has, and it’s inevitable that someone like Stevonnie would sometimes confuse people if they’re trying to squeeze them into a gender box–and unfortunately, that also sometimes means being misgendered, like when Kevin called Stevonnie “girl” during their first appearance on the show.

But then, most notably, in Issue 4 of the ongoing comic series, Peridot goes to a Renaissance Faire and watches a joust, with a visiting knight named “Sir Render.” And Sir Render, despite their traditionally masculine appearance and title of “Sir,” is consistently referred to with they/them pronouns. 

Even though they’re a pretty beefy, hefty knight, and even while they’re getting booed by audience members who want them to lose. Nonbinary people do not have to be androgynous, and they/them pronouns can apply to people who are frequently perceived as traditionally feminine or traditionally masculine. Sir Render doesn’t HAVE to “try” to look androgynous or less traditionally masculine to have their pronouns respected. And Sir Render is a background human. Not a Fusion and not an alien. This comic also includes the phrase “Lords, ladies, and gentle-enbies.” Wow.

Some people have criticized Steven Universe for featuring so many same-gender relationships between Gems without broaching that subject with humans. Gems are not women/girls, but because of their gender presentation and consistent use of she/her pronouns, they are clearly designed to at least be very relatable to female and femme audiences. Nonbinary people are certainly supposed to be able to see themselves in the Gems, but girls and women can too–it’s amorphous and up to interpretation, and couples like Ruby and Sapphire or Pearl and Rose can be very meaningful to fans who feel their relationships are more like their own relationships than most anything on television. But when it comes to humans, the explicitly romantic relationships and crushes that include them are surprisingly straight. (And this is acknowledging that human men’s crushes on Gems are not “straight” crushes, since literally any relationship that includes one of them is a queer-coded romance by human standards, but these men are likely perceiving the Gems as women and being attracted to them for the same reasons they are attracted to women.)

Jamie crushes on Garnet. Mayor Dewey crushes on Pearl. Greg crushed on Rose and fell in love with her. Sadie and Lars have, well, something. Steven and Connie are developing a close friendship that will likely one day be a straight-up romance. Lars’s parents Martha and Dante appear to be a straight couple. Connie’s parents Doug and Priyanka appear to be a straight couple. Vidalia had a child with Marty and married Yellowtail, and those appear to be straight relationships. I of course have to be cautious here and acknowledge that characters who LOOK like straight couples may not be straight, especially since bisexual and pansexual people who “settle down” in a relationship are often misinterpreted as being an orientation they don’t identify as just because of the gender of their partner. But given no evidence to the contrary, the show does appear to be showing us humans coupling up only in cross-gender partnerships.

The only exception I can think of besides non-speaking background characters is Mr. Smiley’s relationship with Mr. Frowney. It is not explicit, but subtext certainly suggests that Harold and Quentin used to be a thing. 

There is also Pearl pursuing Mystery Girl and receiving her phone number, which does suggest Mystery Girl was attracted to femme-presenting people at the very least. 

Oh, and of course we also see Peridot rooting for the Percy/Pierre ship on her favorite show, even though the canon of the show has Percy being pushed toward Paulette. And Uncle Andy made a reference to one of his relatives having a “partner,” which seems like something he wouldn’t do if it was a cross-gender relationship considering he also assumed Greg had a wife and used the word “wife.” (This was offscreen, however–not even pictured characters.) 

But overall, what we’ve seen is that we can have same-gender relationships as long as we can hide it behind aliens for plausible deniability. (Though at least in the United States, I think reports of Cartoon Network actively attempting to stop “gay relationships” from getting on TV is highly exaggerated.) It would be fantastic to get some explicit representation of humans having these relationships too. But at least there are some hints and some subtext, while we really don’t have much of anything for human nonbinary characters.

Like most other situations in the show, I think the usually sensitive writing and nuanced understanding of these important issues would be in reach for the Crew on this topic. I really hope we will see nonbinary characters on this show in the future when there is no “alien” or “Fusion” explanation. Plenty of nonbinary humans exist in the real world, and this show would be a perfect place to start reflecting that.

What you see before you is a list that I hope will be read as an intervention. Nearly 50 women who play a role in NPR compiled and voted on this list. It features albums by artists who identify as female — including some by mixed-gender bands, like Fleetwood Mac and X, that, in our view, relied on women’s creativity for their spark. These albums were released between 1964, the year The Beatles invaded America and set in motion what can be called the “classic album era,” and 2016, when Beyoncé arguably ushered in a new period with her “visual album” Lemonade. The point is to offer a view of popular music history with women’s work at the center. The list does not represent an “alternate history.” It stands for music history, touching upon every significant trend, social issue, set of sonic innovations, and new avenue for self-expression that popular music has intersected in the past fifty years.

A New Canon: In Pop Music, Women Belong At The Center Of The Story

Illustration: Chelsea Beck/NPR