missouri-football

and if you don’t expect too much from me, you might not be let down

I’m not much of a tailgater, and usually after a quick stop to say hi to friends, I go straight in to the stadium to watch other games, and eat sitting down.

This year Mizzou has pre-game concerts, mostly people you’ve never heard of. 

Today, it’s the Gin Blossoms, which is why I’ll be singing “Hey Jealousy” at 9:30 in the morning, with a cold Busch Light as my microphone.

The cover and inner page of an early Kansas vs. Missouri football game program with rules that are much different from today’s game.  The Kansas games were played in Kansas City until 1911, when a conference rule change required games to be played on campus, resulting in Mizzou’s first homecoming game.

Source - University Archives, Collection C:31/00/02 -  http://muarchives.missouri.edu/c-rg31-s16.html

- Gary

2017 Top Games of the Week: Week 5

It’s the end of September and the conference races have officially started now that most schools are playing within their own leagues. There are a couple important games going on at the P5 level, but the bottom end of the top ten is admittedly a little weak this week. There are several important G5 games, mostly in the AAC as those schools begin their conference play in earnest. Finally, the FCS gives us a bunch of ranked on ranked games that will foreshadow the Playoff race at that level. Let’s dive in!

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Top Ten Games of the Week

10. Indiana 2-1 (0-1) at #4 Penn State 4-0 (1-0)

Series Ledger: 19-1 Penn State
Last Meeting: 45-31 Penn State 11/12/2016

Like I said, the bottom of this list isn’t great football, but there is still some interest. Indiana hung around with Ohio State for one half in Week 1, if they can continue to exploit a few weaknesses they might be able to put a scare in the Nittany Lions, who had plenty of trouble keeping Iowa down last week. PSU has won the last three games in this series. 

Keep reading

9

Activism works. 

Something really incredible happened at the University of Missouri today. After months of protests, including a hunger strike by a black graduate student named Jonathan Butler and a refusal to play by black players on the Mizzou football team, university President Tim Wolfe stepped down. This comes after students called for his resignation due to his inaction on various incidents of racism on the campus since he became president in 2012. 

This is an extraordinary moment for Missouri students and students across all campuses who are underrepresented and marginalized. 

Keep fighting. 

#ConcernedStudent1950 #MizzouHungerStrike

The strike of the Missouri Tiger college football team does more than raise the visibility of the struggle against racism. It has the very real potential of actually forcing the removal of Tim Wolfe, University of Missouri President, from his position and getting someone in the seat of authority capable of addressing this poisonous campus climate. That’s because the Missouri football players—like all big time college football players—hold a deep social power. The student body is just 7% black, yet 58 of the school’s 84 scholarship football players are African American. There is no football team without black labor. That means there aren’t million dollar coaching salaries without black labor. There isn’t a nucleus of campus social life without black labor. There isn’t the weekly economic boon to Columbia, Missouri, bringing in millions in revenue to hotels, restaurants, and other assorted businesses without black labor. The power brokers of Columbia need these games to be played. Yet if the young black men and those willing to stand with them—and there are white teammates publicly standing with them—aren’t happy with the grind of unpaid labor on a campus openly hostile to black students, they can take it it all down, just by putting down their helmets, hanging up their spikes, and folding their arms.
—  Dave Zirin - Black Mizzou Football Players Are Going on Strike Over Campus Racism
There is no football team without black labor. That means there aren’t million dollar coaching salaries without black labor. There isn’t a nucleus of campus social life without black labor. There isn’t the weekly economic boon to Columbia, Missouri, bringing in millions in revenue to hotels, restaurants, and other assorted businesses without black labor. The power brokers of Columbia need these games to be played. Yet if the young black men and those willing to stand with them—and there are white teammates publicly standing with them—aren’t happy with the grind of unpaid labor on a campus openly hostile to black students, they can take it it all down, just by putting down their helmets, hanging up their spikes, and folding their arms.
—   “Black Mizzou Football Players Are Going on Strike Over Campus Racism:
In a game changer that could bring down a university president, the Missouri football players are showing just how powerful their labor is.” By Dave Zirin

In an era where “religious liberty” is used as a justification for anti-gay legislation, Westboro instead speaks with a clear voice. And while their slogans and songs are patently offensive, their actions often end up inspiring others to be more tolerant.

Phelps inspired hundreds of counterprotests. After the horrific Newtown shootings, a group of bikers deployed to Connecticut to thwart the Westboro contingent. When Westboro showed up to protest openly gay University of Missouri football player Mike Sam, students there formed a massive human chain to show their support for their classmate. But what happens after those counterprotesters pose, tweet, pack up, and go home? A Westboro counterprotest, warm and fuzzy as it may feel, is about as potent as slapping a “support the troops” bumper magnet on your car and calling it a day. After all, it’s a hell of a lot easier to grapple with some crazies ripping up flags than it is to question your own church’s pastor.

Some have suggested picketing Phelps’ funeral, much as his church protested at the funerals of fallen soldiers and victims of mass atrocities. But protesting his funeral—regardless of how reviled or evil he may seem—would be improper. (Not to mention expensive: Who wants to fly to Kansas for a funeral?) Instead, cheer for the unity Phelps helped provoke, and the displays of goodwill and acceptance he helped foment. Share your Westboro experiences and your make-out selfies. But let Fred Phelps Sr. exit this life quietly as the lonely, bitter, hateful man he became.

If you’re truly bent on sticking it to Westboro’s fallen founder, focus instead on the mundane battles for LGBTQ equality taking place in church congregations and courthouses across the country. While these events may lack the spectacle that Phelps commanded, they will surely change more hearts and minds. What better way to commemorate the life of America’s most famous anti-gay bigot?

—  TYLER LOPEZ, writing in Slate, “How Gays Should Eulogize Fred Phelps”