anonymous asked:

I can't tell you who to avoid in the St. Louis area, but Dr. Kathy Brock (formerly my psychologist through school, has a small private practice) is EXCELLENT. very understanding and good at listening. really great about gender (I'm nonbinary) and sexuality (I'm queer), and was very helpful with my anxiety, depression, and weird attention problems. would 1000% recommend, and very sad I'm no longer working with her.

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States Spend Hundreds Of Thousands On Welfare Drug Testing, Turn Up Barely Anything

As state legislatures convene across the country, proposals keep cropping up to drug test applicants to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, or welfare. Bills have been introduced so far in Montana, Texas, and West Virginia, with a handful of others also considering such a move. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) has gone further, proposing to drug test applicants for food stamps and unemployment benefits. They follow recent bills put into action in Maine, Michigan, and Mississippi.

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Missouri awards licenses for medical marijuana

ST. LOUIS (KSDK) - A type of medical marijuana is one step closer to cultivation in the state of Missouri, and soon, a treatment option for certain patients.

This week, the Missouri Department of Agriculture issued two licenses for hemp cultivation and production. These are the first such licenses issued since lawmakers passed a bill last year, permitting patients suffering from seizures to use hemp oil for treatment.

The two recipients are non-profit organizations based in the St. Louis area: Noah’s Arc Foundation, listed with a Chesterfield address, and BeLEAF Corporation, to be located on a piece of land in St. Peters.

Late last month, during a meeting of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen, a shoving match broke out among members of the public — some of them off-duty police officers.

The cause of the tension was a proposal to create a new civilian oversight authority for the police. Advocates of police reform like civilian oversight, but police officers say the boards are often politicized and unfair to them.

The concept of civilian police oversight isn’t new. In 1965, New York Mayor John Lindsay proposed including civilians on a review board as a way to address complaints from minority groups about police misconduct. But the move backfired; the police union and conservatives such as William F. Buckley rallied against civilian oversight, and voters later defeated the idea in a city-wide vote, returning the the board to police only. It took more than two decades for civilian oversight of police to be restored in New York.

The idea fared better in other cities. In Kansas City, Mo., the Office of Community Complaints was the brainchild of a personal injury lawyer named Sid Willens. He says his eyes were opened to the problem of police accountability in 1965, when he tried to get justice for a client who’d been badly beaten while handcuffed. Willens says the police department’s internal investigation simply confirmed the officer’s version of what happened. “It’s like having the fox guard the chicken house,” Willens says.

Police Are Learning To Accept Civilian Oversight, But Distrust Lingers

Photo caption: Late last month, a scuffle cut short a St. Louis Board of Aldermen meeting where a committee was to discuss a proposed civilian review board for the city’s police force. Photo credit: Robert Cohen/Courtesy of St. Louis Post-Dispatch