mission on mars

10 Questions About the 2017 Astronaut Class

We will select between eight and 14 new astronaut candidates from among a record-breaking applicant class of more than 18,300, almost three times the number of applications the agency received in 2012 for the recent astronaut class, and far surpassing the previous record of 8,000 in 1978.

The candidates will be announced at an event at our Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas at 2 p.m. EDT on June 7. You can find more information on how to watch the announcement HERE.

1. What are the qualifications for becoming an astronaut?

Applicants must meet the following minimum requirements before submitting an application.

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution in engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science or mathematics. 
  • Degree must be followed by at least 3 years of related, progressively responsible, professional experience or at least 1,000 hours of pilot-in-command time in jet aircraft
  • Ability to pass the NASA Astronaut physical.

For more information, visit: https://astronauts.nasa.gov/content/faq.htm

2. What have selections looked like in the past?

There have been 22 classes of astronauts selected from the original “Mercury Seven” in 1959 to the most recent 2017 class. Other notable classes include:

  • The fourth class in 1965 known as “The Scientists: because academic experience was favored over pilot skills. 
  • The eighth class in 1978 was a huge step forward for diversity, featuring the first female, African American and Asian American selections.
  • The 16th class in 1996 was the largest class yet with 44 members – 35 U.S. astronauts and 9 international astronauts. They were selected for the frequent Space Shuttle flights and the anticipated need for International Space Station crewmembers.
  • The 21st class in 2013 was the first class to have 50/50 gender split with 4 female members and 4 male members.

3. What vehicles will they fly in?

They could be assigned on any of four different spacecraft: the International Space Station, our Orion spacecraft for deep space exploration or one of two American-made commercial crew spacecraft currently in development – Boeing’s CST-199 Starliner or the SpaceX Crew Dragon.

4. Where will they go?

These astronauts will be part of expanded crews aboard the space station that will significantly increase the crew time available to conduct the important research and technology demonstrations that are advancing our knowledge for missions farther into space than humans have gone before, while also returning benefits to Earth. They will also be candidates for missions beyond the moon and into deep space aboard our Orion spacecraft on flights that help pave the way for missions to Mars.

5. What will their roles be?

After completing two years of general training, these astronaut candidates will be considered full astronauts, eligible to be assigned spaceflight missions. While they wait for their turn, they will be given duties within the Astronaut Office at Johnson Space Center. Technical duties can range from supporting current missions in roles such as CAPCOM in Mission Control, to advising on the development of future spacecraft.

6. What will their training look like?

The first two years of astronaut candidate training will focus on the basic skills astronauts need. They’ll practice for spacewalks in Johnson’s 60-foot deep swimming pool, the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, which requires SCUBA certification. They’ll also simulate bringing visiting spacecraft in for a berthing to the space station using its robotic arm, Canadarm2, master the ins and outs of space station system and learn Russian. 

And, whether they have previous experience piloting an aircraft of not, they’ll learn to fly our fleet of T-38s. In addition, they’ll perfect their expeditionary skills, such as leadership and fellowship, through activities like survival training and geology treks.

7.  What kinds of partners will they work with?

They will join a team that supports missions going on at many different NASA centers across the country, but they’ll also interact with commercial partners developing spaceflight hardware. In addition, they will work with our international partners around the globe: ESA (the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and the Russian space agency, Roscosmos.

8. How does the selection process work?

All 18,353 of the applications submitted were reviewed by human resources experts to determine if they met the basic qualifications. Those that did were then each reviewed by a panel of about 50 people, made up primarily of current astronauts. Called the Astronaut Rating Panel, that group narrowed to applicants down to a few hundred of what they considered the most highly qualified individuals, whose references were then checked.

From that point, a smaller group called the Astronaut Selection Board brought in the top 120 applicants for an intense round of interviews and some initial medical screening tests. That group is further culled to the top 50 applicants afterward, who are brought back for a second round of interviews and additional screening. The final candidates are selected from that group.

9. How do they get notified?

Each applicant selected to become an astronaut receives a phone call from the head of the Flight Operations Directorate at our Johnson Space Center and the chief of the astronaut office. They’re asked to share the good news with only their immediate family until their selection has been officially announced.

10. How does the on boarding process work?

Astronaut candidates will report for duty at Johnson Space Center in August 2017, newly fitted flight suits in tow, and be sworn into civil service. Between their selection and their report for duty, they will make arrangements to leave their current positions and relocate with their family to Houston, Texas.

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You are on the first manned mission to Mars. As you begin to enter Martian orbit, something goes wrong. A wormhole appears, destroying your ship, but transports you across the universe. Alone and unsure how to get home, you find an advanced alien civilization that mysteriously speaks English…

Happy International Women in Engineering Day from your friendly neighborhood International Space Station​ Flight Controller, Spacesuit Engineer, Spacecraft Thermal Management Engineer, Spacecraft Communication Systems Engineer, and Flight Mechanics/Trajectory Engineer. 💪😁 #myfriendsareinspiring ❤

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NASA’s MAVEN Discovers How Mars Lost Its Atmosphere

“The good news for us, mind you, is that the magnetic field here on Earth shows no sign of ceasing anytime soon. The dynamo in the core may do things like flip and reverse, swapping north-and-south magnetic poles, but we should continue to stay protected from the solar wind far into the foreseeable future: for billions of years (at least) to be sure. We could, conceivably, one day suffer the same fate as Mars, but our mass, our rotation and our active, dynamic core should keep the Earth’s magnetic field in business for at least as long as the Sun shines!”

If you had taken a trip to our Solar System four billion years ago, you would have found two worlds with liquid water oceans, temperate atmospheres and all the conditions we believe are needed for life. Earth would have been one of them, but Mars would have met all those criteria, too. It was long suspected that something happened to Mars around a billion years into the Solar System’s history that caused it to lose its atmosphere, something that should still be going on today. Thanks to NASA’s Maven mission, we’ve measured this atmospheric stripping by the Sun for the first time, and we’ve reached a few incredible conclusions, including that in about two billion years, Mars will be completely airless, and that if we were to terraform Mars today, it would hang onto this new atmosphere for millions of years.

Come get the full story of how Mars lost its atmosphere, and learn what NASA’s Maven mission has taught us so far!

Now that I think about it, Disney should really make a ride called ‘The Ghost’ where you’re taken on an intricate, twisting, fast ride like you’re onboard the actual 'Ghost’ driven by Hera in the middle of an attack.

Bonus for having the character’s voices over the speakers while you ride or even short video beforehand of them talking to you.

Alternative history/Fictional space project

“Ambition 1” ascent module launching from the surface of Mars.

If you want to support the STNW project, you can get prints at https://society6.com/macrebisz

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Disneyland attraction tickets, 1975-1977

headcanons about The Martian universe:

-something goes wrong at NASA, or anywhere where Mark Watney frequents, blame it on mars. it started as him mumbling about it, and it spread. coffee maker breaks? “goddamnit mars.” somebody’s computer fucks up? “fuckin’ mars!” another rocket explodes upon being launched? "I BLAME MARS”

-the people in Watney’s household, his students, and the people at NASA when he’s around like to play disco music at increasing volumes. they see how loud they can get it till he notices.

-Mark Watney starts listening to disco music on his own sometimes. nobody’s really sure if its ironically or not.

-everytime someone fucks up at NASA, they are met with a (mostly) joking remark along the lines of, “Mark Watney, space pirate, colonized MARS, and you can’t even transfer files correctly!!!!”

-the above but with the next manned mission to mars. someone’s like “ugh i spilled the dirt sample i just took so now i have to recollect it” and their crewmate is overdramatically like , “ mA RK WATNEY, SPACE PIRATE, COLONIZED THIS GODFORSAKEN PLANET, AND U CANT EVEN COLLECT DIRT ?  U CALL URSELF A GOOD ASTRONAUT”

-”remember this, class, you might need it if NASA leaves you behind on a desolate planet someday”

-the crew with kids, at some point, all go to their kids school during “job day” or whatever where they talk about their jobs. the crews like “i was an astronaut! we accidentally left our friend on mars, but let’s not talk about that.” except Mark Watney and hes like “U WANT A JOB WITH A LOT OF EXCITEMENT? GO BE AN ASTRONAUT. THEY MIGHT LEAVE U ON MARS TOO, THEN PAY U A LOT BECAUSE THEY FELT BAD.”

-right after they found out that Watney was alive on mars, commander Lewis turns to Beck and is like, “uh huh. he’s dead, SUUURE” and cocks her eyebrow and beck is like “o H SHIT” bc hes the one that first plain out said that watney was dead and they had to go fast off the planet

-every year on his birthday NASA/the ares III crew/friends/family/fans send Mark Watney at least 80 different space/mars related things, including a card every year that says “sorry we left you on mars” with another sheet of custom made stickers that say “I SURVIVED MARS” with a lil thumbs-up astronaut

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The Voyager Golden Records are phonograph records that were included aboard both Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977. They contain sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth, and are intended for any intelligent extraterrestrial life form, or for future humans, who may find them. Neither Voyager spacecraft is heading toward any particular star, but Voyager 1 will pass within 1.6 light-years of the star Gliese 445, currently in the constellation Camelopardalis, in about 40,000 years. 

The Voyager Golden Record contains 115 images plus a calibration image and a variety of natural sounds, such as those made by surf, wind, and thunder, and animal sounds, including the songs of birds and whales. The record additionally features musical selections from different cultures and eras, spoken greetings in fifty-nine languages, and printed messages from President Jimmy Carter and U.N. Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim. The items were selected for NASA by a committee chaired by Carl Sagan of Cornell University.

“VEGETABLES GROWN IN MARTIAN SOIL FOUND TO BE SAFE TO EAT”

Scientists at the Wageningen University in the Netherlands were to successfully grow edible vegetables in soil similar to that found on Mars. Tests done on the harvest showed that the plants contained ‘no dangerous levels’ of heavy metals and researchers declared the results promising. Although the experiment did not take place in actual Martian soil, scientists did use dirt from Earth to create a mix that was as close as possible to soil found on the surface of Mars. The experiment found that radishes, peas, tomatoes, cress, rocket and rye all flourished in Martian soil. The original experiment took place in April 2015, with the final harvest finished in October 2015. Inside a glass house, the plants were cultivated under constant temperature, humidity and light conditions and under Earth atmosphere. 'This is because we expect that first crop growth on Mars and moon will take place in underground rooms to protect the plants from the hostile environment including cosmic radiation’, said lead researcher Dr Wamelink. This experiment is in an important step in the journey of humans to Mars as soils from Mars are known to contain toxic heavy metals such as lead, arsenic and mercury. If future colonists were to ingest these metals while eating Martian crops, it would be devastating for their health and for the colony.

Read more about this fascinating story on: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3658092/Astronauts-really-farm-food-Mars-Vegetables-grown-Martian-soil-safe-eat.html

“Fun facts about Mass Effect” is going to be the title of my autobiography.

In 2025, the mission Mars One is a full success. Upon arrival on the red planet, the astronauts notice some kind of cave, containing a single human skeleton – and four words, carved into a wall.

Imagine being the person to debrief Chris Beck after his dangerous mission to Mars. As a scientist, you’re impressed with the amount of skill he showed during his long expedition. As a woman, you’re aroused - his intelligence, his ingenuity, his luscious hair. The flattery was dripping from your inquiries. You try to be subtle, but he must be catching on because the look on his face says he’s enjoying this interview as much as you are.