misc:resources

nenna-nee  asked:

May I ask how one make a zine?

So there’s quite a few ways to go about making a zine! You can always do a solo zine, in which all the art/comics/writing is created by you. This can be done traditionally (handwritten/printed out) or digitally (through Gumroad or a similar service.) A great thing about zines is that they are pretty cheap and easy to make.

Here’s some good resources for folding the paper into a booklet, along with other general tips: 

http://zine-scene.tumblr.com/post/118386407819/spx-christ-schweitzer-just-whipped-out-the

http://zine-scene.tumblr.com/post/152398733448/gemmafemma-subtleceiling-this-is-my-quick

http://zine-scene.tumblr.com/post/145459126509/krismukai-earlier-this-year-i-was-asked-to

http://zine-scene.tumblr.com/post/149999813917/hello-do-you-have-any-zine-making-tips-or-tricks


Now if you want to bring together a group of people to create for your zine that’s going to take some more effort. A good start is having a common theme that everyone makes something for (zines don’t necessarily need themes, but it helps creators to have a prompt.) Next you’ll need a due date for the finished pieces, along with how many creators you would like to be featured. Is every submitter going to be accepted? Or do you have a set number of people you’d like in your zine (if so, it helps to have people submit their websites so you can get an idea of their work.) 

Once you have an idea for how big the zine will be, you should decide upon payment. How much will creators get?  “Just for fun” zines, and charity zines are common, but it’s always good practice to at least offer creators a copy of the zine.

After all the creators have submitted you can go to print, you can offer it online on gumroad, or you can just post it online for all to see! 

Hope that helped, good luck creating!

aikafuwaa  asked:

what materials did you use for learning codes? if you dont mind sharing! im really interested to learn but i dont know how

To start off from scratch:

  • The most basic thing you need to know about making Tumblr themes is from the Tumblr theme documentation page; it has guidelines and framework on how to make the simplest theme.
  • Some people have also made base codes that you can start off from (shared via theme-hunter). 
  • LMThemes has also made a theme tutorial series that you can follow (I’ve never used it myself but you can check it out!)

After you’ve gotten hang of the basics, you design your layout. Here’s where I look for inspiration:

  • Codrops - web design ideas and tutorials
  • Dribbble - a site where designers share all sort of creations; not all of them are layout ideas, but they might spark your interest!

Now for actually coding the specifics of your layout:

  • CSS-Tricks - exactly what it sounds like! They have tutorials, too
  • w3schools - tutorials and references on web development languages

Where to go when you’re stuck (if you’re like me, that’s most of the time):

  • stackoverflow - search for questions that have been answered by users themselves with answers in forms of code snippets (so you can see how it works), or ask some yourself!
  • Google - yes, I had to put this in. Seriously, you’ll find an answer one way or another; and if you don’t, you’ll still learn something new!
themaesters.tumblr.com
icon directory by @themaesters

We’re compiling a page of various Game of Thrones related icon vaults.  If you want to search for an icon, we encourage you to use this page to find icon makers!

If you’re an icon maker and you would like your vault to be added, please let us know!

**Please note that avatars on the page are drawn through Tumblr’s API.  Any discrepancies you see there comes from either changing urls or Tumblr being slow to update.  We apologize for this in advance.

Hey, Tumblr. We’re back with another round-up for Mental Health Month. This batch o’ blogs are resources you can turn to and organizations you can rely on. The best part is that they’re so, so easy to access and utilize. Here are just a few of them.

Originally posted by crisistextline

Crisis Text Line (@crisistextline)

Crisis Text Line is free, 24/7 support. If you’re in crisis, please text 741741 from anywhere in the US. The Crisis Text Line will connect you with a trained Crisis Counselor. If you don’t need to use their services, consider signing up to be part of their services. All it takes to become trained in crisis counseling is a desire to listen and help others.

Originally posted by twloha

To Write Love on Her Arms (@twloha)

To Write Love on Her Arms started as a Myspace post. Since it took off, they’ve donated more than $1.5 million to treatment and recovery programs, granting funding to 73 different organizations and counseling practices. They have a pretty good repository for finding help, with listings easily found either by location or reason you’re seeking help.

Originally posted by gnomosexuals

The Trevor Project (@thetrevorproject)

The Trevor Project is one of the leading national organizations providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ+ youth. You can call their trained counselors at 1-866-488-7386, use TrevorText by texting “TREVOR” to 1-202-304-1200, or reach out via TrevorChat.

Originally posted by aestheticallyequal

National Alliance on Mental Illness (@namiorg)

When it comes to making the world a better, more understanding place for mental health, NAMI (nearly) does it all. Across the US they educate to make sure people are getting the help they need, they advocate for public policy, and they listen. You can reach the NAMIHelpLine at 1-800-950-NAMI (6264) or info@nami.org.

Originally posted by itgetsbetterproject

It Gets Better (@itgetsbetterproject)

It Gets Better Project wants to create and inspire change for LGBTQ+ youth. While they do suggest hotlines to call for immediate help (like The Trevor Project), their primary objective is to spread the message that, well, it gets better.

If you don’t live in the US, you may haven noticed most of these are US-based resources. Don’t worry. We have you covered too.

Writing With Color – Featured Research Guides

Although WWC shares resources when we can and bring some to the table ourselves, we don’t exist to seek outside sources for one’s writing; this is ultimately the writer’s job. Even so, we’re more than happy to offer guidance on the What, Where and How of doing research for your inclusive writing. 

Take a look at some of the research help & resources complied below:

Research

Research Sources

WWC Tags and Help

General Research

Cultural and Religious Research 

Historical Research

Fantasy Sci-Fi & Research

Name Research/Resources

Resources

Cultural and Religious Resources

WWC Naming Resources/Guides

–WWC

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips on how to remember the initial, middle, and final forms of the arabic alphabet?

Hi there! 

Well, what helped me out the most was to look at patterns. A lot of letters in the Arabic alphabet are different forms of other letters. Therefore, grouping them by this was very helpful for me.

Below is an example of this. It may be helpful to learn the reading form of the letters and then learn the proper way to write them afterward so that you can recognize the letters first and not worry about writing them correctly.

Here is a list of videos that teach it this way. There are 6 in total.

In addition, I highly recommend the Memrise course, How to Read Arabic and the app, TenguLogi Arabic Script so that you can test yourself. It takes some time to get used to the alphabet, but if you spend 20 minutes a day, you should be ok in a week :D

Masterpost: Islamic Concepts, Words & Phrases!

So, as promised, here’s the masterpost of the different, most common, types of concepts, words and phrases that we, as Muslims, use in our day to day speak, and perform on the daily. The reason for this masterpost is so that, if and when Season 4 airs, and if it is about Sana, then most likely, these words and phrases, or concepts, may be commonly used/addressed, so it’s always nice to just, have a reference, I guess, of their meaning, so that you can understand the context and definition a little better! 

CONCEPTS.

Islam: The word “Islam” in itself means to submit, to surrender - to give yourself over to Allah, to feel the peace that giving yourself over to Allah brings to you.

Allah: The Arabic word for God.

Muhammad (sal’lalaahu alayhi wasalam): The final prophet sent down by Allah to mankind, with the religion of Islam. (sal’lalaahu alayhi wasalam), or sometimes seen as Muhammad (SAW) means ‘peace be upon him’, which you’ll sometimes see as Muhammad (PBUH). It is an extension we add on to the name Muhammad, whenever the prophet Muhammad (SAW) is being referred to, out of respect.

“The 5 Pillars of Islam”: These are, in essence, the 5 core aspects of Islam, that every Muslim must believe in, and do to their full potential, unless it is detrimental to their health, or they are unable to do so due to a lack of wealth:

  • Shahaadah - This is the very core belief of a Muslim. They “must testify and bear witness that there is no deity but Allah, and that Muhammad (SAW) is his worshipper and messenger.”
  • Salah - The 5 daily prayers, which must be read. These are Fajr (the prayer we read before sunrise), Zauhar (the midday prayer), Asr (the late afternoon prayer), Maghrib (the prayer we read before sunset) and Isha (the night prayer). Each of these prayers are signalled when the Adhaan (the call to prayer) is heard, and before performing these prayers, Wudhu (ablution) must be made.
  • Zakah - Alms, charity. Every year, we must take a portion of money out from our combined wealth that we own to give to charity to the poor and needy. Of course, to do that, Islam sets certain rules on how much wealth you must have in order to classify if whether you are in a position where you can give charity or not.
  • Sawm -  Fasting in the month of Ramadhan. Ramadhan is the 9th month of the Islamic calendar, whereby the start and the end of it is marked by the sighting of the crescent moon. During Ramadhan, Muslims all over the world must fast from sunrise to sunset, abstaining from food, water, sex and sin. They must instead increase their worshipping of Allah, by performing Salah and increasing their Tilaawat (reading of the Qur’aan), Tasbeeh (praising of Allah) and indulge themselves as much as they can within Islam. Suhoor (morning meal) is the meal we eat before sunrise happens, kind of like a breakfast, before we begin our fast for the day, and Iftaar (evening meal) is the meal we eat to break our fast, just as sunset is about to occur. Taraweeh is an additional compulsory Salah that Muslims must pray in Ramadhan (since this Salah is only read during Ramadhan, and in no other month beside it) after the Isha Salah. The end of Ramadhan is marked with Eid ul Fitr, the first of our 2 Eids that we have within the year, a celebration! The fasts in Ramadhan are only compulsory on people that are physically and mentally healthy enough to do them. 
  • Hajj - The 5 day sacred pilgrimage that takes place in the final month of the Islamic calendar, once a year. Muslims all over the world travel to Saudi Arabia, more specifically, Makkah and the surrounding cities near it, to perform their Hajj. Only those that are physically and mentally healthy, and that can afford the Hajj, will find it compulsory on them to do so. Our 2nd Eid, Eid ul Adha is celebrated on the 3rd day of Hajj, by remembering the sacrifice that the Prophets Ibrahim (Abraham) and his son, Ismail (Ishmael) were to make. 

Qur’aan: The Holy Book of Islam. It is considered to be Allah’s final word, and the final, unchanged Holy Book that was sent down via Angel Jibra’eel (Angel Gabriel) to the Prophet Muhammad (SAW). 

Hadeeth: The teachings and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) that were reported by his close family and friends.

Sunnah: The beloved actions of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) that were reported by his close family and friends.

Shari’ah Law: The Islamic ruling. Any Muslim country will most likely be governed by the Shari’ah Law. However, its not just people living in a Muslim state that must abide by the Shari’ah Law. Muslims all over the world must try their best to abide by it too. The Shari’ah Law is based upon the teachings of the Qur’aan, which hold the most weight in Islam, with a little understanding from the Hadeeth and Sunnah, in terms of how to apply these Laws.

Jihad: The word itself means to struggle, to battle. There are 2 types:

  • Jihad Kabeera: The Greater Struggle/Battle - this is the one we as Muslims face on a daily basis, within ourselves, to better ourselves as believers of Allah, to always do the right thing by Islam, which is something that affects us on a daily basis, especially if we live in the West, since we face the battle of living in the Western society, as well as being Muslims, and choosing to do the right thing. 
  • Jihad Sagheera: The Lesser Struggle/Battle - this is the one where we proactively, as Muslims, must fight against anyone who wrongfully says ill about Islam. In it, we must take care that we are not hurting those, who have not hurt us, but rather, that we fight against the common prejudices, stigmas and stereotypes that are placed on Islam and Muslims. 

Hijaab: The headpiece the women of Islam are recognised by. However, hijaab is not just that. Hijaab is also in the way we dress modestly, the way we must act modestly, the way we must speak modestly, because the woman’s modesty in Islam is very, very highly valued and respected. Men are told lower their gazes in front of women. 

Niqaab: The face veil that some, not all, but some Muslim women choose to wear, if they want to.

Burqa: The long material that covers the head and reaches thigh length, that some women, again, choose to wear, if they don’t want to wear the Hijaab, but something a bit more looser and covering.

Abayah: The long “dress” the women wear, on top of their usual clothes. Most of the times, these are black, with several printed or embroidered designs on them for more fancier wear, or sometimes they are simple, for more everyday wear. Not all women wear an abayah, and not every abayah is black in colour.

Thobe/Jubbah: Kind of like an abayah, but for men? I guess? It’s a long stitched garment, that comes in many different colours, mostly neautrals, like white, gray, beige, black, blues, greens etc, that men wear. Muslim men in the East wear this more frequently than Muslim men in the West, but Muslim men in the West would most likely wear this on Friday, Ramadhan, and Eid - on sacred occasions.

Dua: Prayers. So, when you raise your hands and pray to Allah, and ask anything of him and remember the people who you want to remember in your prayers to Allah.

Jummah: It means Friday, which is the holy day for Muslims. Kind of like Sabbath, I guess. On Fridays, instead of the Zauhar prayer, men normally go to the Masjid (the mosque) to offer Jummah Salah (The Friday Prayer), where the Imam (the person leading the prayer) will give a Kutbah (a short sermon) regarding a specific topic to do with Islam.

Masjid: The Mosque. This is where Muslims gather to pray Salah 5 times a day.

Madressah: Islamic schooling - so, Islamic classes that, most often, take place inside the Masjid, i.e, the mosque, when it is not being used by the general Muslim public to offer Salah.

WORDS & PHRASES.

As-salaamu’alaikum Warahmatullahi Wabarakaatuhu: This is a greeting, both used as a hello and a goodbye between Muslims. As-salaamu’alaikum - May peace be upon you, Warahmatullahi - And Allah’s mercy, Wabarakaatuhu - And his blessings. Usually though, most people will only say/use As-salaamu’alaikum.

Allah Hafiz: May Allah protect you. This is another greeting we have that Muslims use as a goodbye.

Bismillah hirahmaa niraheem: In the name of Allah, the most Merciful, the Most Kind. It’s a phrase we use/say when we’re about to start something, we start whatever we do in the name of Allah, by remembering him so that whatever we’re doing will have a successful outcome. Somtimes, we just say Bismillah, in short, which just means, In the Name of Allah.

Subhanallah: Glory be to Allah. This is a Tasbeeh (a praise of Allah) that is said when something overwhelms you, so much so, that you literally have to take a moment and glorify Allah for having that thing overwhelm you, whether it be someone’s beauty, something’s beauty, or something that’s happened that’s overwhelmed you in a really positive way.

Alhamdulillah: All praises be to Allah. This is a Tasbeeh that’s said when you’re thankful for something. Thankful for anything or anyone, for food, for good health, after we sneeze we say Alhamdulillah, or if someone is asking you how you are, you can simply reply back by saying Alhamdulillah, and they’ll understand that you are in good health, or if someone is offering you something extra, like food, for example, then you can simply say Alhamdulillah, and they’ll understand that you’re content with the amount you have.

Allahu Akbar: Allah is the Greatest. This is another Tasbeeh, but it’s used in quite versatile ways. It’s the first and last phrases of the Adhaan, it’s said in Salah, but it’s also used in daily speak too, most often when we want to reaffirm our belief in Allah, to remind ourselves that, Allah is our sole keeper of destiny, and that, sometimes, things we don’t anticipate can happen too. It’s a resounding statement of faith, that can invoke feelings of strength when it is needed, telling you to reevaluate where your faith is at. Or if something that you can’t believe is happening, you’ll say Allahu Akbar, to express your disbelief in it.

Insha’allah: If Allah wills. This is something we say when we’re thinking about the future, and we hope that the way we think about the future is something Allah is willing to offer us. Kind of like a “I don’t wanna jinx it”.

Mash’allah: Allah has willed. This is something we say out of respect for a situation, if it’s gone in favour of someone else we’re speaking to, or if we’re appreciating someone, whether it be their beauty or their character. It’s a way of showing someone that you’re extremely happy that Allah has willed for something to go their way. 

Wallah: I swear by Allah. It’s something you say when you’re absolutely serious about something, because you are swearing to Allah about it, you are keeping Allah as your witness about it.

Astagfirullah: I seek forgiveness from Allah. This is said when you’re repenting to Allah, or someone else may say this to you if they’re reminding you of something wrong that you did/are doing, not as a way to patronise, but to remind you that you have a choice in not doing that wrong thing either.

Jazakallah Khair: May Allah reward you with the best (of rewards). This is said in place of thank you, when you’re thanking someone for something, Most people sometimes just say Jazakallah, or either Baarakallah (May Allah’s blessings be upon you.)

Ameen: Amen. Something you say when you’re agreeing with something, or accepting something from someone.

Mubarak: Glad tidings/Congratulations. Usually you’ll hear people say this in Ramadhan or Eid, to each other, or if someone tells someone else they’re going for Hajj/have come back from Hajj, you’ll hear the phrases:  Ramadhan Mubarak, Eid Mubarak, Hajj Mubarak etc, but generally, it’s just used as way of saying congrats.

Nikah: Wedding.The actual wedding ceremony.

Ammi: Mum.

Abba: Dad.

Habibi/Habibti: The Most Beloved. Where Habibi is the masculine term, and Habibti is the feminine term. It’s not just said to the person you love romantically, it can be said platonically too, and quite often, is.

anonymous asked:

hello! i've been trying to research magic, but unfortunately most books i find are specific wicca, which i'm not interested in. do you have any book reccomendations that arent wicca centric? thank you! i love your blog :^)

Oh heckin yes I do My amazon wishlist is literally like six pages long… ALL BOOKS

WARNING: This Is Going To Be Extremely Long!

First though I want to note that while I 100% understand your feelings about the Wicca stuff (being a very NOT Wiccan Witch), not all books that are Wicca leaning are bad! I’ve gotten loads of useful information from books that tended to be a little new agey. That’s where being objective comes in! With ANY book, you should take it with a grain of salt, and some with a whole shaker. But it’s up to you to pay attention to misinformation and conflation, and to know how to do research to prove or disprove that something in a book you read is true or not. Does that make sense?? 

Anywho, a couple of books that are still kind of “Wicca-y” but great:

Those are all books from my personal collection that I would recommend! Now as for the Non-Wicca Books, Let’s dive in! Not all of these have I read or owned, and they are in no particular order. You’ll notice most of them relate to “Traditional Witchcraft” or West Country, because that is where my practice is focused. 

PHEW!

That was a lot! Okay anon I hope this gives you a good starting place! 

constantly-disheveled.tumblr.com/ask

LazyTown in different languages

Inspired by @malteseboy​ ‘s Peppa Pig in different languages

Originally posted by robbieglaepur

LazyTown, meme show supreme, is a good show to use for practice! The show has been dubbed into nearly 32 languages, according to the Wikipedia, so there should be something for everyone. It is faster than Peppa Pig and I’d recommend it mostly to people at B1/B2 level, but it can be good just to let the language wash over you for the immersion. It’s use of songs are quite nice breaks between dialogue too. There is also generally a lot of it free on YouTube, which is nice 

The for Icelandic learners there are also the original stage plays 

huffingtonpost.com
11 Books By Latinas Every Feminist Should Add To Their Collection

For decades, Latina authors have written empowering stories of women navigating family, culture and societal norms to find their true selves.

Books by Gabby Rivera and Alida Nugent have most recently helped paint a portrait of what it means to be a Latina feminist today. But even before these women put pen to paper, authors like Sandra Cisneros and Laura Esquivel were already paving the way with narratives centered on strong Latina women.

In the spirit of intersectional feminism, we compiled a list of 11 books by Latina authors that every feminist should read.

Books I’ve Gotten For Free or Very Cheap on Amazon Kindle

This is just a list I could come up with through five or ten minute searches per subject. Not all of these are worth the read, but some of them are hidden gems!

For Free:

  • The Modern Guide To Witchcraft; Skye Alexander
  • The Way of the Hedge Witch; Arin Murphy-Hiscock
  • Good Spells for Bad Days; Skye Alexander
  • Bare Bones Cunning Craft; David Mackenzie
  • Craft of the Untamed; Nicholaj de Mattos Frisvold
  • Witches, Broomsticks, and Flying Ointments; Abigail Lance
  • The Only Tarot Book You’ll Ever Need; Skye Alexander
  • Naughty Spells/Nice spells; Skye Alexander (Lots of Skye books!)
  • Several Other Skye Alexander Books
  • Candle Magic; Raven Willow 
  • Magick in the Kitchen; Leandra Witchwood
  • Book of Shadows; Ashlyn Hawthorne 
  • The Way of the Green Witch; Arin Murphy-Hiscock
  • A Green Witches Cupboard; Deborah J. Martin
  • West Country Witchcraft;Gillian Macdonald & Jessica Penberth
  • The Green Mother’s Book of Shadows; Gwenyfur Draigtanllwyth
  • Moon Spells; Diane Ahlquist
  • Sisters Grimmoire; Bree Nicgarren and Anna Zollinger
  • The Witches Cupboard; Bree Nicgarren and Anna Zollinger
  • Suburban Witchcraft; W.B. Skowronska

For Cheap:

  • Pagan Portals-Hedge Witchcraft; Harmonia Saille(2.99)
  • Traditional Witchcraft For Fields and Hedgerows; Melusine Draco (1.99)
  • All Traditional Witchcraft books by M. Draco for 1.99
  • A Deed Without a Name; Lee Morgan (4.61)
  • A Grimoire For Modern Cunningfolk; Peter Paddon (4.99)
  • Pagan Portal- By Wolfsbane and Mandrake Root; Melusine Draco (5.99)
  • What’s Next After Wicca?; Sophia diGregorio (2.99)
  • Traditional Witches’ Formulary and Potion Making Guide; Sophia diGregorio(4.99)
  • Pagan Portals- Kitchen Witchcraft; Rachel Patterson (3.03)
  • The Kitchen Witch Glossary of Cooking Herbs & Spices; Mimi Riser (.99)
  • Simple Tea Lead Divination; Deran Gray (.99)
  • The History of Witchcraft in England from 1558 to 1718; Wallace Notestein(.99)
  • Witchcraft Today; Gerald Gardner (1.20)
  • Fairycraft; Morgan Daimler (3.99)

Since it’s been a while since we last made a masterpost, I figured I’d make one. So below you’ll find a list of all the blogs you’ll ever need for your tumblr or photoshop needs. Bolded ones = favourites.

GENERAL RESOURCES  ― @arabellasources  //  @chaoticresources  //  @fandomresources​  //  @fuckingphotoshop  //  @itsphotoshop  //  @manyresources  //  @peachresources  //  @photoshopcupcake​  //  @photoshopdeluxe  //  @quirkyresources  //  @reblogresources  //  @resourceme  //  @rresources  //  @whoaps  //  @yeahps  //  @yeahsource

COLOUR PALETTES  ― @1302933  // @color-palettes  //  @dailypalettes  //  @royalspalettes  //  @spectrra  

FANSITE HEADERS  ―  @arizonadesigns  //  @fansitehelp  //  @headersonline

ICONS  ― @aryavatars  //  @dashiconsxo  //  @dashtars  //  @firedash  //  @lightavatars  //  @toxicdash

PSDS  ― @artjunkpsds  //  @ameriepsds  //  @colorarepsd  //  @itscolour //  @pswonderland  //  @rosiepsds  //  @selenapastel  //  @sixcoloring  //  @stipslerie  //  @vannilapsds  //  @wasirauhlpsds  

THEMES  ―  @1204px  //  @acuite  //  @extasisthemes  //  @felinum  //  @mrsthemes  //  @neonbikethemes  //  @nymphthemes  //  @odeysseus  //  @painthemes  //  @shythemes  //  @solarre  //  @solitudethemes  //  @theme-hunter  //  @themesbysofia  //  @vortexthemes

OTHER USEFUL BLOGS  ―  @capsforedit  //  @colorgifs  //  @lovsgifs  //  @textureporn  //  @yourfonts

Remember to like or reblog if you find this helpful!

Writing With Color – Featured POC Profiles

Writing With Color is grateful to receive PoC Profiles from folks all over the world, PoC Profiles being a snapchat in the life of folks of marginalized race, ethnic and religious groups who share their stories. This post features some that have gained traction from readers and resonated with many (Based on 2014-2016 results).

Top Frequented Profiles

Personal Experiences on Important Topics

We highly encourage reading all of the perspectives WWC readers have to offer. You may find them insightful, especially in regards to getting that “real” perspective as well as learning more of how people would like to be portrayed in media, as many offer thoughts on their representation.

View the rest of the collection of PP here.

If you’ve got some experiences to share as a PoC and/or ethnic or religiously marginalized person, submit them to writingwithcolor.tumblr.com/submit.

Don’t know where to start? Topic ideas provided here.

–WWC

helpmewithadulting  asked:

Hi! Do you have any recommendations for other growing up/moving out/budgeting/etc. blogs that I can follow?

There are very few here on tumblr. I know of @unfuckyourhabitat & there are some helpful things over at @hercampus-blog.

If you follow the HTGTFU twitter (or read the round-ups), you’ll find a lot of good resources off-tumblr. Here are a few to get you started.

Do you know of something else? Put it in the comments & I’ll check it out.

cyprin-sims  asked:

What are your must have cash cc assets?

Standards: Default skin | Skin Overlay | Eyes

These are the CAS CC I always use. The great thing is that most of them, if not all are compatible with all ages! I’ve updated my resources page to look like this as well for future reference. (:

idk with some things telling people just to “google it” isn’t very helpful, and I know I personally tell people to just google shit, but like theres some stuff that’s blatant, and some stuff thats going to have a million different opinions on the topic, and google doesnt show the same results for everyone.

so like maybe if your point is really nuanced and you want people to understand it, perhaps don’t tell people to simply google it … because that could lead to some bad shit. like maybe just wait until you have time to explain it, or ask someone for help to explain it?