minority models

A white: but saying Asians are naturally smart is POSITIVE discrimination:)))

Me: The model minority myth was invented by whites as a tool of antiblackness to create divisions between communities of color and prove that ‘anyone can succeed in America if they just TRY hard enough!!1!’ thereby implying that antiblackness is black ppl’s own fault for not TRYING enough. Additionally, it relies on false interpretations of data and hurts the opportunities of all Asians, particularly less privileged ones, and dehumanizes Asians by furthering stereotypes of us as some kind of innately robot-like monolithic-minded hive, devalues our individual accomplishments and uses us as a tool to further antiblackness

buzzfeed.com
People Are Claiming This Asian American Doctor Who Took A Knee Is Too Privileged To Speak Out
Dr. Gu told BuzzFeed News he was simply supporting black Americans after Trump's remarks, but he believes he's now being told to stay quiet, grateful, and act as the "silent model minority".
By Tanya Chen

“The common theme among these white supremacists is to accuse me of ‘Asian privilege,’” Gu said. “Their arguments were that because I went to Stanford and Duke Medical School, I should be thankful and not complain about systemic racism…”

“It struck me as incredibly racist because I have every right to show solidarity with African-Americans in this country, my fellow Americans, who are subjected to police brutality and injustice…“

“In fact, successful white Americans and Hollywood stars comment about this all the time. Why is it that I, as an Asian-American, cannot comment on prevailing social and racial issues affecting America today? Do I have no voice?” Gu added.

Perfect case study of how the model minority myth/perceived whiteness of East Asians is used to damage antiracist efforts

A lot of people think representation in media/Hollywood is a trivial matter and not one of the “real issues.” But when Asian-Americans are dehumanized by their portrayals (or lack thereof), the impact can go far beyond mere social perception, resulting in hate crimes and institutional harm like discriminatory legislation. For Asian-Americans to be treated as people, we must be depicted as people. Representation matters.

(Just a reminder: Do not alter or repost my work. However, sharing directly from my pages is always encouraged and appreciated)

Please don’t forget that Asian American immigration history exists and is being used as precedent for a lot of gross policies, like directly with Japanese Internment making the Trump Admin think Muslim Internment is an option. Don’t forget that even President Obama erased our immigration history in his farewell address when he compared immigrants of today to the Irish and German and Poles and said nothing of the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, South East Asian, Vietnamese, “waves” of immigrants literally imported to work the fields bc they would take a lower wage. Don’t forget about the refugees that fled the Vietnam and Korean and other wars and regime changes that came here to start from nothing and are now our nail salon jokes. Our history is full of disgusting immigration acts created by the US govt and they have the gall to pat us on the head and call us a model minority.

Don’t let them get away with it. History is supposed to teach us not to do bad things again.

thatlethalsoul  asked:

I have a huge group of mercenaries that I'm building up to write about for a Team Fortress inspired writing, but I'm super conserned on how to make my "sneaky and shifty" spy character of the team. What races/ethnicities would you guys reccomend I avoid putting into this role to avoid the worst negative stereotyping?

Avoiding Stereotypes by Avoiding Tokenism

If you only have one of any particular ethnicity on a team, none of them will avoid negative repercussions. 

We’ve spoken about tokenism before, and this is a prime example of why you should avoid it. Having only one member of any ethnicity on a team means all of their traits are representative of their ethnicity, so you’ll be enforcing the worst of the behaviour.

On the flipside, avoiding having the Token PoC be any sort of “meaty” role in fear of avoiding stereotypes denies them their humanity. Part of good representation is letting us be the messy people we are— which includes sometimes doing stuff that fits stereotypes, even if they’re negative. The problem isn’t the “they have negative traits.” The problem is “there’s only one of them of that ethnicity.“ 

By having 2+ of any one ethnicity, you give people the room to be themselves because there’s another member of the team not like that. It breaks down the unconscious associations between the character’s ethnicity and the negative traits, by removing “of course [character]’s behaving like that, they’re [ethnicity]!” with “but [other character] doesn’t do that, and they’re [ethnicity], too.” 

(You will always get people insisting the one who doesn’t behave in the morally reprehensible way is just “one of the good ones”, but this helps cut them down— also why it’s important to have a diverse background cast with similar variety in personality types, jobs, and moral alignments)

Fear and Representation
I’m going to talk about a deeper issue I see here, which is fear of messing up. You don’t want to hurt people by doing it wrong, don’t want to be yelled at for reinforcing negative things.

This fear hurts you more than it helps you.

We get a lot of “how do I avoid stereotypes” questions. We get a lot of “how do I not hurt people” questions. We don’t answer the majority of them because if you write from a place of fear, you will not represent PoC well.

Writing good representation is not handling a bomb that’s about to explode if you press it wrong. Writing good representation is about a curiosity, love, and respect for people not like yourself. You’re curious about their stories and are invested in telling them. You love them as people, as their genuine reality. And you respect them enough to want to do them justice in your writing.

If you approach writing diversity with fear, you will not let us be human. Because by fearing writing us, you end up creating model minorities because you just can’t let them be evil, that’s bad. You other us even further by not letting us have the same internal lives and same shades of experience as white people.

People mess up. People have complex morality. Not letting us mess up or have other moral alignments than goodie two shoes strips us of our personhood.
Put all types of us into your stories. Some things you Don’t Do— like Jewish blood mages and Natives who are so much simpler but so much happier because of it— but if you approach us like people with different backgrounds, you’re at least on the right track. And if you make it that multiple people of the same ethnicity exist, then you don’t have to worry about one character being the be all end all of representation.

The thing about these types of questions— “what stereotypes do I avoid"— is you’re not really asking What Do I Not Do. You’re asking "can you tell me what to do so I don’t get yelled at for it”, as if there are magic lists of 100% Safe Traits for different ethnicities.

Safe Traits are not people. Until you ease down your fear of being Safe, of Not Reinforcing Bad Things With One Character, you will not be able to truly tackle representation in your work. The work you have to do is much deeper than putting in “acceptable representation.” 

You have to redefine “acceptable representation” in your mind. It cannot mean “a character who is safe to write without hurting anybody.” What it can mean, however, is “showing the diversity of humanity by displaying multiple people having worthwhile, nuanced, dynamic, and messy stories to tell that reflect their lived reality.”

~Mod Lesya 

>>  I’m super conserned on how to make my “sneaky and shifty” spy character of the team. What races/ethnicities would you guys reccomend I avoid putting into this role to avoid the worst negative stereotyping?

I’d especially stay away from making this character Jewish since that’s already a stereotype for us, and East Asian since there’s a negative trope about East Asians being “inscrutable” (i.e. “you can’t tell what they’re thinking so they could totes be plotting bad stuff!”)

Standard disclaimer that if you have a cast of many many Jewish characters or many many East Asian characters you can make one of them sneaky because the rest of them will show that it’s not an inherently Jewish (or East Asian) trait, but it sounded like you wanted a variety of ethnicities for this project so probably best just to stay away from making the Spy either of those two groups.

–Shira

8

eyyy i made a cool hair ref for Guy cause his hair is… so hard to draw… and then i decided to make one for everyone!  models-resource saved my life and now they can save YOURS TOO

A piece from New York Magazine’s Andrew Sullivan over the weekend ended with an old, well-worn trope: Asian-Americans, with their “solid two-parent family structures,” are a shining example of how to overcome discrimination. An essay that began by imagining why Democrats feel sorry for Hillary Clinton — and then detoured to President Trump’s policies — drifted to this troubling ending:

“Today, Asian-Americans are among the most prosperous, well-educated, and successful ethnic groups in America. What gives? It couldn’t possibly be that they maintained solid two-parent family structures, had social networks that looked after one another, placed enormous emphasis on education and hard work, and thereby turned false, negative stereotypes into true, positive ones, could it? It couldn’t be that all whites are not racists or that the American dream still lives?”

Sullivan’s piece, rife with generalizations about a group as vastly diverse as Asian-Americans, rightfully raised hackles. Not only inaccurate, his piece spreads the idea that Asian-Americans as a group are monolithic, even though parsing data by ethnicity reveals a host of disparities; for example, Bhutanese-Americans have far higher rates of poverty than other Asian populations, like Japanese-Americans. And at the root of Sullivan’s pernicious argument is the idea that black failure and Asian success cannot be explained by inequities and racism, and that they are one and the same; this allows a segment of white America to avoid any responsibility for addressing racism or the damage it continues to inflict.

“Sullivan’s comments showcase a classic and tenacious conservative strategy,” Janelle Wong, the director of Asian American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, said in an email. This strategy, she said, involves “1) ignoring the role that selective recruitment of highly educated Asian immigrants has played in Asian American success followed by 2) making a flawed comparison between Asian Americans and other groups, particularly Black Americans, to argue that racism, including more than two centuries of black enslavement, can be overcome by hard work and strong family values.”

‘Model Minority’ Myth Again Used As A Racial Wedge Between Asians And Blacks

Illustration: Chelsea Beck/NPR

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Korean rapper, Dumbfoundead, made a genius video “Safe” last year addressing Hollywood whitewashing roles and the lack of proper representation of Asians. He put himself in iconic scenes from movies with predominantly white casts. The lyrics also address “model minority” stereotypes and things like that. If you never peeped, I’d def recommend it.

Stereotyped vs Nuanced Characters and Audience Perception

Writing with color receives many questions regarding the stereotypes Characters of Color and their story lines may possess.

There’s a difference between having a three-dimensional character with trait variance and flaws, versus one who walks the footsteps of a role people of their race/ethnicity are constantly put into. Let’s discuss this, as well as how sometimes, while there’s not much issue with the character, a biased audience will not allow the character to be dimensional.

But first: it’s crucial to consider the thinking behind your literary decisions.

Trace your Logic 

When it comes to the roles and traits you assign your characters, it’s important to ask yourself why you made them the way they are. This is especially true for your marginalized characters.

So you need an intimidating, scary character. What does intimidating look like on first brainstorm? Is it a Black man, large in size or presence? (aka a Scary Black Man) A Latino with trouble with the law? If so, why?

Really dig, even as it gets uncomfortable. You’ll likely find you’re conditioned to think of certain people in certain roles on the spot.

It’s a vicious cycle; we see a group of people represented a certain way in media, and in our own works depict them in the way we know. Whether you consciously believe it’s the truest depiction of them all or not, we’re conditioned to select them for these roles again and again. Actors of Color report on being told in auditions they’re not performing stereotypical enough and have been encouraged to act more “ethnic.” 

This ugly merry-go-round scarcely applies to (cis, straight) white people as they are allowed a multitude of roles in media. Well, then again, I do notice a funny trend of using white characters when stories need a leader, a hero, royalty, a love interest…

Today’s the day to break free from this preconditioned role-assigning.

Keep reading

According to the 2009 American Community Survey, there are fifteen million Asian-Pacific Americans who make up forty-three different ethnic groups and who originally came from twenty-eight Asian countries and fifteen Pacific islands. The “model minority” myth disregards the social and economic hardships faced by recently arrived Southeast Asian refugees, particularly the Hmong. In the 1990s, high school graduation rates were about 35 percent for Cambodian Americans, 36 percent for Lao Americans, and 58 percent for Vietnamese Americans— and all of these numbers are well below the overall average of 82 percent for Asian Americans as a whole. Due to the “model minority” myth, public schools do not even bother to record Asian-Pacific American student dropout rates; yet, at the time of the study, about half of Hmong female students dropped out of school before graduation (Walker-Moffat 1995; Xiong and Tatum 1999). A Hmong woman comments, “As Asian Americans, we face the ‘model minority’ myth that hurts so many Hmong because we have so many challenges.” In addition, since Hmong and other Asian Americans are perceived in American society as “strangers from a different shore,” the validity of their professional decision making is often put on trial. As a Hmong American female attorney attests, “As a prosecutor of color, people presumed I held a bias in favor of other people of color and could not prosecute a case neutrally without regard to race.”
—  “Women in the Hmong Diaspora” by Dia Cha in Diversity in Diaspora: Hmong Americans in the Twenty-First Century (2013)
Dear White Friends,

If you gonna ask me to help with your math homework just because I’m Korean, let me ask you to help me with my English homework. Don’t be surprised when we both fail, and newsflash, your race or skin color doesn’t automatically determine what you’ll be good at in school – although I’m starting to think that all you pasty motherfuckers are lacking a few crucial brain cells.


Submitted by @lunatictobelle

There definitely are many similarities between antisemitism and anti-asian racism in terms of how the “model minority” stereotype is lobbed at us in two ways: 1) to deny that we have real problems (with respect to poverty, racism, assault, etc) and that our people are suffering, and 2) to blame us for various political and economic ills that a society is suffering. I think this is why I’ve always felt a camaraderie with Jewish people growing up, even when I witnessed white Jewish people being anti-asian and non-Jewish Asian people being antisemitic. I’m going to read that article to learn more about this, but I definitely think there’s been a shared history and as such there is potential for more solidarity (which is crucial for the Asians in Jewish circles/the Jewish people in Asian circles in particular).

duncanoa-blog  asked:

Why do businesses have dress codes?

Classism. The whole idea that we have to “look right” is a holdover from what capitalism evolved from in the first place. It was, and still is, a short hand to tell who the serfs and the nobles are - or in the case, the hourly and the salaried workers.

Artificial scarcity is one of the means by which they enforce this. “Good” clothes are priced out of range of low wage workers, so even when they do have the liberty to wear as much and want to, they are often not able to afford it. A country club that requires a fancy suit to enter is going to be largely out of access to most low wage workers.

This applies to both employees of a place and to guests of a place.

Capitalism further expands the idea, however, by turning employees into branding. There is absolutely no functional reason why, say, a retail cashier couldn’t wear a comfortable dress. It does not hinder their job in any way, and no one needs them to wear a name tag to know that if they are standing at a register with the light on that they are there to check you out.

When you look at corporate structure you can see a direct line between the lowest wage workers’ clothes and the highest wage workers’ clothes. Some of that does come from safety concerns - steel toed boots for construction workers, for example - but many people find sturdy boots hella more comfortable than oxfords. Even so, when was the last time a CEO wore steel toed boots?

This applies mostly to workers of a place.

There’s also racism involved. We see this often in the way specific POC hair styles are banned to workers, and how certain styles are banned to guests. What your hair looks like doesn’t affect most, if any, jobs. It also doesn’t affect the vast majority of other guests. But you can ban dreadlocks on account of white matted hair being dirty, and you successfully lock out a healthy style for POC. It also allows people to demand conformity to a different social standard - such as requiring flattened / straightened hair - that reinforces the model minority myth.

This applies to both employees of a place and guests of a place.

There’s a lot more nuance to how racism affects this stuff that I just don’t have a frame of reference for, and if you’re interested in learning more I highly recommenced POC activists and social theorists bc they can explain more than just the basics as well as more accurately describe how classism, racism, and capitalism all go hand in hand.

[EDIT: please see this post regarding conflating black women’s marginalization with the marginalizations experienced by other POC.]

im sick of people being so ignorant abt asian people and asia in general. we are not!!! all!!! the !!! same !!!!! some kid today claimed that the japanese and chinese languages “are basically the same” right in my face !!!!! why do ppl think racism against asian people doesnt exist!!! why is everyone so ignorant??? why are we never discussed in the media?? why r racist jokes against us a casual funny thing?? why r we basically lumped in w white ppl.. FUCK your model minority idea!!! fuck the idea that only east asia exists and there is only ONE ASIAN CULTURE. just one?? do ppl not understand that asia is fucking huge. there r so many cultures and languages and ppl and yet we r all lumped into one and our women r treated like were all fair skinned small eyed black haired delicate girls and we r fetishized and sexualized so much. treated like were exotic creatures, objects for white men. r representation in the media is shit and r problems r never discussed and im just. sick of it

White History Month

A Caucasian co-worker and I(Yup! The same one from the last post. Go figure.) were discussing why there should or shouldn’t be a “White History Month”. Nevermind the fact that EVERY MONTH is White History month. But I decided to humor him and play along…

“There should be White History Month” so we can expose all the evil things white folks have done in history and present that still affect the victims and their descendants till this very day like:

1 Cherokee Trail of Tears
2 Japanese American internment
3 Philippine-American War
4 Jim Crow
5 The genocide of Native Americans
6 Transatlantic slave trade, and the lies that Africans sold other Africans into slavery
7 The Middle Passage
8 The history of White American racism
9 Black Codes
10 Slave patrols
11 Ku Klux Klan
12 The War on Drugs
13 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
14 How white racism grew out of slavery and genocide
15 How whites still benefit from slavery and genocide
16 White anti-racism
17 The Southern strategy
18 The rape of enslaved women
19 Madison Grant
20 The Indian Wars
21 Human zoos
22 How the Jews became white
23 White flight
24 Redlining
25 Proposition 14
26 Homestead Act
27 Tulsa Riots
28 Rosewood massacre
29 Tuskegee Experiment
30 Lynching
31 Hollywood stereotypes
32 Indian Appropriations Acts
33 Immigration Act of 1924
34 Sundown towns
35 Chinese Exclusion Act
36 Emmett Till
37 Vincent Chin
38 Islamophobia
39 Indian boarding schools
40 King Philip’s War
41 Bacon’s Rebellion
42 American slavery compared to Arab, Roman and Latin American slavery
43 History of the gun
44 History of the police
45 History of prisons
46 History of white suburbia
47 Lincoln’s racism and anti-racism
48 George Wallace Governor of Alabama
49 Cointelpro
50 Real estate steering
51 School tracking
52 Mass incarceration of black men
53 Boston school busing riots
54 Man made Ebola and A.I.D.S.
55 Church Bombings and fires in deep south to Blacks
56 Church Shootings
57 How the Irish and Italians became white
58 The Perpetuation of the idea of the “model minority”
59 Housing discrimination
60 Systematic placement of highways and building projects to create ghettos
61. Medical experimentation on poor poc especially Blacks including surgical and gynecological experimentation
62 History of Planned Parenthood
63 Forced Sterilization
64 Cutting children out of pregnant Black mothers as part of lynchings
65 Eurocentric beauty standard falsification
66 Erasure and eradication of all achievements of Ancient Africa and Kemet
67 White washing of history and cultural practices of poc’s
68 Media manipulation and bias
69 Perpetuation of the myth of reverse racism
70 The history of white cannibalism
71 White fragility
72 White on white crime and white on everybody else crime
73 Irish slavery, Jewish slavery, African slavery, Native American slavery
74 White police officers murdering unarmed men, women, and children and not being convicted for it
75 Population control warfares worldwide
76 Chemtrails
77 Oil spills and chemical dumping in oceans worldwide
78 Water fracking
79 Gmo foods worldwide
80 Monsanto
81 World Wars 1 and 2
82 Wars on indigenous peoples throughout the world
83 Stolen inventions and blueprints from African people and other indigenous people worldwide
84 Steal concepts from cultures worldwide and then corrupt it
85 Mass murders and massacres worldwide
86 Eugenics and the history of sterilization of poc and history of fetal abortions worldwide
87. Flint Michigan water poisoning crisis

and too much more….

Yet you all have convinced the world and your delusional selves that melanated human beings “black” people are perceived as dangerous, unruly, racist, uncivilized, thugs, gangsters etc… Yeah ok not according to historical and present day facts.

Needless to say… We don’t have these types of discussions anymore. 😎😉😂