minorities representing

So Netflix really out there cancelling out of the best shows? Sense8 was amazing, it had good LGBT representation, characters with different races and cultures, beautiful cinematography, interesting plots and an amazing writing.

They also had the nerve to cancel The Get Down earlier this month, a show were the cast was 99% Black/Latinx and now they are coming for the only diverse show left.

Netflix actually keep 13 reasons why that didn’t even needed a second season because it was legit only ONE BOOK, Hannah is dead and the 13 reasons are known plus the producers of the show ignored the warnings and got people wih mental illness suicidal but of course money and mainstream media speaks louder.

Sense8 and The Get Down deserved better. The LGBT community deserves better and so did the minorities represented in those shows. To everyone that didn’t got to see sense8 I recommend you to do so and fall in love with the beauty that was the show and the intriguing plot lines.

I understand that both series had a big budget but if the reason to cancel sense8 was the expensive locations then for anyone who watched the season 2 finale knows that for season 3 location wasn’t going to be an issue. PLUS Netflix did a terrible job promoting both shows so idk how they could’ve expected a bigger audience.
vox.com
Iraqi Christians face genocide at home. Now the Trump administration wants to send them back.
ICE officials arrested dozens of Iraqi Christian nationals over the weekend in the Detroit metro area. Families worry loved ones will face a death sentence if they’re returned to Iraq.
By Sarah Wildman

“Chaldeans have been targeted by ISIS and subjected to genocide, as have other religious minorities,” said Representative Anna Eshoo (D-CA), who is herself Chaldean Catholic of Assyrian descent, in a statement. “Their deportation represents a death sentence should they be deported to Iraq or Syria.”

I trust Julie and Iman

Have had a couple thoughts about how Season 4 is coming out and just wanted to share them.

i personally love this season. Julie has already publicly stated how she’s constantly scratching her head on how to keep us intrigued and being one step ahead of us. 

She’s done EXACTLY that. Everyone seems to be so invested and hurt by any little thing that happens on SKAM this season, and that’s okay! That’s literally what her intensions are. To make us mad, to make us sad, to make us THINK. 

No matter what this season has publicly exposed those who are racist, those who are homophobic and those who are understanding. 

That’s GOOD. We live in a world where we should be able to realize that there are things that are wrong and things that should be exposed and talk about things.

I also WHOLE-HEARTILY trust Iman. That girl is so unique. She was so smart to take advantage of an opportunity where she would be allowed to represent a minority in a Western Country.

She KNOWS she has a responsibility.  She wouldn’t have done this if she thought Julie was a white-obsessed supremacist or some shit. 

She’s even said that for her to do something like this, she would get hate from her own culture; but she took that chance because she knows that SKAM has an international fan base, and the world NEEDS to understand that being Muslim, doesn’t mean she’s not human or bad. Especially with everything going on right now. 

Seeing her curse, being sad, and making misjudgments is only to show that Muslims deal with the same issues that anyone else does. It’s not like Muslim’s have to be perfect all the time? And here she is, showing us that she’s just like any other teenage girl who gets hurt. Yes, her religion is different; and SKAM has shown us that as well. (and I trust that they still will show us more) But never to the point where it consumes who she is, because at the end of the day Muslims are still human, and we all make mistakes. 

And SKAM has done JUST THAT. 

Fucking amazing. 

Thank you Julie and literally everyone else behind it.

You’ve made me think, you’ve made me understand, and you’ve made me want to learn more.

You can call Guillermo a monster fucker all you want, but in the end he’s being more brave than a lot of writers. He’s throwing an idea he’s had since a child into the public despite what everyone thinks.

To me this is really inspiring, and honestly he’s allowing ideas that were unhindered by the teachings of adulthood that were too much as a child, and he’s bringing them into his current day. He’s been saying that this is the movie that he likes the most, that this movie is the most personal to him. He claims that he’s had this movie in mind since he was six years old.

You can’t tell me you didn’t have an idea when you were young, and dream of making it a reality, only to be told that it couldn’t be because it was over your head for the time or that it was unrealistic. To me, his vigor is inspiring and his drive? Even moreso.

In this interview, he talks more about what inspired him for this movie (The Shape of Water) and why he’s writing in the first place, but one part that stuck out to me was him saying that in some of his previous movies he was representing his childhood, but this one represents adulthood; some of his more recent struggles such as his immigration and the discrepancies in treatment towards him versus the white man.

When he mentions the America that people think of when they say “Make America great again.” He points out that they likely mean that America, the one where the white man strives but the minority had oppression and the gay man had the AIDs Crisis. If you weren’t white or straight, America wasn’t great. And he believes that despite this movie being in 1960, it’s still accurate today and I agree.

To him, the creature represents the minority and Elisa stands for the ability to love for reasons beyond reason. He’s making a dark story that contains romance but none of the pandering that a typical romance holds. It’s blaringly realistic despite the sci-fi themes.

Guillermo Del Toro is a brave poet who’s bringing a new method for a timeless message, and I’m not only inspired, but as a writer, I’m praising him.

Why "The Hunger Games" matter.

The Mockingjay? A poor girl.

The guy who saved her life? A generous black poor boy.

Her first inspiration to be the Mockingjay? A sweet black poor girl.

The person who transformed the heroine into the Mockingjay? A talented black man.

District 13 president? A determined woman.

District 13 chief of security? A kind-hearted black man.

District 13 chief of technology? An extremely intelligent black man. In a wheel chair.

Panem’s next president, which will also bring back democracy? A woman. A black one. A very courageous and fair one.

The best TV director from the Capitol? A talented woman.

Her main assistent? A black man.

One of the camera men? A mute poor guy.

OMG AN WHITE, STRAIGHT (?), CISGENDER (?) GUY! But nah, he was a poor one. Still a minority.

Just like Gale.

And Peeta (also, he doesn’t have a leg, but we’re talking movie *sigh*, so…).

And the character who was forced into prostitution was… a guy, not a girl.

Wait, where are the [irony] good men [/irony], the white, middle/rich class, cisgender, straight ones, not disabled, not opressed ones? Here’s one:

I know there have been white-washing and I know it’s still not perfect at all. But way to go, The Hunger Games. That’s why this series means so much to me.

Major Arcana Tarot Asks

The Fool: how long have you been reading? 

The Magician: how did you begin?

The High Priestess: if you have family in your life, do they know you read the tarot? have you ever given a reading for a family member?

The Empress: head, heart, or body?

The Emperor: earth, water, fire, or air?

The Hierophant: do you write down your readings or interpretations of them? do you take pictures? if you write them down, how and in what format?

The Lovers: list 22 random things that impact your life, one for each card in the Major Arcana. (physical objects. concepts and whatnot don’t count.)

The Chariot: are you on a journey of some kind right now? if so, what step do you think you are at? (you may do a single one-card draw for help if needed.)

Justice: is how you read tarot now different than it was when you began, or do you use the same methods? if so, describe.

The Hermit: are you better at doing readings for the future or readings of introspection for the past/present?

The Wheel of Fortune: if you know them, what are your birth cards? if you don’t know them, look them up.

Strength: do you have any religious beliefs? if so, what are they? (if you feel comfortable talking about them here.)

The Hanged Man: if you can label it: do you lean towards introversion or extroversion? in which conditions does it show the most?

Death: pull 1 card and name a lesson you believe it offers.

Temperance: in what area of your life do you need balance?

The Devil: has the Tarot ever helped you in making any major decisions? if you read for others, have your readings ever helped somebody else?

The Star: pull 1 card and make a playlist based on it.

The Moon: pull one card and name the first fear of yours that you think of.

The Sun: pull 1 card and name a talent of yours that comes to mind with that card.

Judgement: pull 1 card. describe the first person who comes to mind when you see or think of that particular card.

The World: tell us a Minor Arcana card that represents someone you love.

Bonus- the Suits!

Suit of Cups: what emotion influences your life the most?

Suit of Wands: do you do any other divining or witchcraft? if so, what kind?

Suit of Swords: what’s something you’re particularly knowledgeable about?

Suit of Pentacles: what deck(s) do you have?

OK but can we talk about Aladdin for a hot minute. 

It’s the only mainstream+popular movie/theatre show that belongs to Arabs. Yet all the roles in the musicals everywhere - England, Australia, America - are going mostly to white actors, with some black/Asian actors. Not a single role in a film with exclusively Arab characters has gone to any Arab actors. There’s the actress who plays Jasmine in the Australian production, Hiba Elchikhe, who may or may not be Arab, I’m not sure. But that’s about it. 

Now that they’re looking to cast people for the live-action remake (I’m fucking sick of all these Disney remakes, but that’s a rant for another time)  - predictably, they’re struggling to find actors. But all the ones in the running, save for Jade from Little Mix who’s half-Arab, are either black, white, or South Asian. 

You’re telling me that in this entire world, there’s not a single Middle Eastern actor/actress suitable for these iconic roles? That’s bullshit. I stayed silent when all the theatre roles went to actors of other ethnicities, but the movie will reach a much wider audience, so it’s arguably more important that they get the right actors. Arabs are possibly one of the least represented ethnic minorities in Hollywood - the only Arab actor I can think of is Rami Malek. Fine, whatever, there aren’t many roles in the entertainment industry for Arabs, I get it. But this is a movie, set in Agrabah, a fictional country loosely based on Baghdad, and it should have Arab actors. 

anonymous asked:

I need your help friend, the fandom is at stake: can you do a quick recap of why shipping isn't activism? And I don't mean just in terms of antis, but also the anti-backlash where people defend their ships by trying to prove they're actually progressive (which would still imply you need to prove your ship is not harmful before shipping it). Fans may have good intentions and mean no harm, but social justice is not achieved through fantasy.

what a good question. let me see if I can do this justice with a good answer.

First off: let’s define ‘shipping’ as ‘desiring two characters to have romantic and/or sexual interactions and using social media or fanworks to share this desire with others.’  So: specifically looking at shipping as a social activity here, because I hope we can all agree that ‘shipping it’ - simply wishing for two characters to have some kind of interaction in your head - is not activism because it’s thoughts, which on their own nobody else knows about and thus can’t have an impact.

Shipping as activism is mainly talked about in the context of being ‘queer/LGBT representation’, and everything else is treated as secondary.*  So I’ll be talking about this primarily from that POV.

Okay.

shipping is not activism because shipping doesn’t do two important things that activism does: 

  • shipping does not generate or act as mainstream representation
  • shipping does not increase awareness or change social values

and that’s okay. Shipping doesn’t need to do these things because shipping takes place in a microcosm. Fandom is but a tiny, tiny fraction of internet and social activity as a whole. No matter how ‘progressive’ we collectively are, only in the rarest cases will we make a meaningful impact on society as a whole.

Shipping serves a different, but no less important purpose, which I’ll get into below.

That’s the short version. the long version is below.

Shipping is not activism because: 

Shipping is a fandom-specific activity and fandom doesn’t make much of a social impact. We get talked about a lot by the creators because we’re the people most likely to have contact with them and provide feedback on their content; we have an impact on creators in that sense.  But apart from coming to cons and talking on social media, when we get mainstream attention it’s almost always to talk about how weird we are. Also, we don’t cause social change. We can fan over something that already exists, but we can’t cause a show with better representation to be created.

Because of this: 

Meaningful, mainstream representation of LGBT/queer relationships come from mainstream media, and fandom is not the main force acting on mainstream media productions.  Remember when korrasami became canon in the last few minutes of the last episode of Korra because the creators knew about the shippers? Congratulations: you’re looking at an outlier that took a lot of very specific circumstances and luck to have happen. And most importantly: it wasn’t done to please the shippers.  Shippers may have given them the idea, but it was done because canon korrasami would create visible bisexual/LGBT representation. It was possible because the show was only airing online, to a smaller audience, and because of the herculean efforts of LGBT/queer activists over the last century to get our collective visibility and acceptability as high as it is (and yes, we have a long way to go, but we’re miles past where we were even 10 years ago.)

Current fandom seems to carry the belief that if we just ship hard enough and loud enough, the creators of an ongoing mainstream media will reward us by making our favorite ship canon.** The reality is we rarely, if ever, make a meaningful impact on the direction that canon takes. We’re a small, small part of the consumer base - a loud one, but small!  We’re often not the aimed-at demographic, either, so pleasing us is the last thing the execs trying to make a buck are thinking about. The material we’re fanning over is already old news to producers; short canons are usually already finished by the time we receive it, and longer ones are at least a season ahead in production time. (If we do make an impact, we won’t see it for at least a year or more.)  Shows must meet decency standards, and LGBT/queer relationships are still seen as higher-rated than their cishet counterparts.  Executives care about what will sell ad space or toys more than what fandom wants.

The fact of the matter is we have the cause and effect backwards.

Ships being ‘good representation’ is a function of increased mainstream media representation of marginalized identities, not the other way around.  When media was entirely full of characters who were white cis men, we shipped white cis men. And as media slowly stops having nothing but white cis men, we’re … still shipping white cis men a lot, because there’s still a lot of them and there’s still a societal bias that tells us that white cis men are the most important/interesting people (and simultaneously, because they are unmarked, we can’t accidentally fall into stereotype pits while fanning them), but we’re shipping more and more non-white, non-cis, non-male characters too. 

Real social activism leads to increased media representation - like the reclaiming of the word ‘queer’ in the late 80′s/early 90′s leading to a TV show called ‘Queer as Folk’ and featuring gay characters. And increased media representation leads to more marginalized characters for fandom to ship.

While transformative fandom does, to an extent, change things from canon to represent ourselves more - or just to suit our fancy! - canon always reigns supreme and is the most widespread version of the characters.  Canon becoming more diverse will always have more of an effect on fandom than fandom being diverse/having diverse content will ever have on canon.

Besides:

The desire to see ships become canon is not primarily motivated by generating healthy representation of marginalized identities.  Fans have been wanting their favorite ships to become canon since the Stone Ages.  The Harry Potter fandom wars were all about what was most canon: Harry/Hermione, Hermione/Ron, or Harry/Ginny.  Notably: Draco/Harry is not one of the pairings I list, because nobody thought there was the remotest chance that Draco/Harry would ever become canon.  It’s only recently that LGBT/queer rep in particular has been making a meaningful appearance in mainstream media, and suddenly slash ships have entered the ‘will it be canon!?’ fray. And some mlm fans feel they have more ‘right’ to canon because mlm ships are LGBT/queer rep.

Here’s the thing: if this was really about representation, then we’d all be celebrating if any mlm pairing became canon. No matter which pairing is ‘more progressive’, any LGBT/queer canon representation is better than none. But (surprise!) it’s not; the ‘queer rep!’ battle cry is just an additional cannonball in the arsenal of ongoing ship wars.*** And I venture to say that most mlm shippers engaged in a ship war would rather see an unrelated het pairing become canon than their rival mlm ship.

And this is because: 

Shipping is not, and never has been, primarily about creating healthy marginalized representation.  Don’t get me wrong: transformative fandom is heavily LGBT/queer/mentally ill/disabled/otherwise underrepresented, and we often create transformative fanworks that bring our identities into the story. That’s awesome self-fulfillment, and it can really bless and excite fellow fans who see fandom content that makes them feel more welcomed and recognized.  However.

Generating marginalized representation isn’t the primary motive for shipping. We ship out of love. We see the dynamics between two characters and think ‘oh, that’s hot’ or ‘I’d like to see more of that’. We ship for fun. We ship because we think two characters would look good together. We ship because we imagine ourselves as one character and have a crush on the other. We ship things for many, many reasons, many I haven’t mentioned here, maybe as many reasons as there are people in fandom doing shippy things.  And to that end, I’m sure that some people do decide what to ship purely because they believe it represents minority groups that need representation - but it would be too much to say that’s the main reason people ship things.

Shipping doesn’t need to be about creating healthy marginalized representation because:

Fiction is not reality; a person can ship the ‘right’ ships and still be a bigot IRL. and visa versa. Because we interact with fiction and reality in different ways, there are people who really love mlm ships but still think gay marriage is icky. On the other hand, a person can be the loudest activist for LGBT/queer causes in real life and only ship het ships in fandom, just because the dynamics of het ships pings their fancy more.

Shipping as activism preaches to the choir. Shipping being a fandom-specific activity, and many of us being oppressed ourselves, shipping the ‘right’ ship to increase awareness in the microcosm of fandom isn’t really accomplishing anything. Most of us are ourselves LGBT/queer, or friends with people who are LGBT/queer. Most of us are aware of how much pain the lack of representation in mainstream media brings on.  And most of us are sensitive to the fact that we’re not the only oppressed person in fandom space and are willing to learn more about how we can help other oppressed people.

If I could sum up the problems of current fandom, it’s that we assume that nobody else is #woke (even though most of us are sufferers). In that sense, shipping the ‘right’ ship doesn’t bring more awareness; it acts as a signal to others that you have awareness, and hopefully protects you from being erased or harassed as an ignorant asshole (’cishet’).

Most importantly:

Shipping isn’t activism, but it does something else great: it lets marginalized fans express and indulge themselves in any way that pleases them.  - fandom is primarily made of underrepresented minorities, so shipping is a way that we express ourselves and relate to one another - whether those ships are ‘progressive’ or not. So, so many of us deal with social stigma or harassment or hate in our real lives; we consume media to get away from that, and we indulge in fandom to get away from that.  Most of us are, just by existing and demanding space in the world, activists for the rights of the marginalized and oppressed. Fandom is a space for us to play with each other and connect over something fun and pleasant, and those fun and pleasant things don’t have to be activist things. We’re allowed to take a break.

The importance of activism and representation is to benefit the marginalized and oppressed, letting us be recognized and less stigmatized, and deconstructing the social and political structures that work against us leading fulfilling lives.  When we use shipping the ‘right’ ship as a bludgeon to attack one another, we are literally defeating the purpose of our own causes. We’re stigmatizing each other for our fandom interests. And we’re certainly not deconstructing any social structures that harm us!

In conclusion:  The way we can be most activist in transformative fandom is, no joke, to care more about the fact that almost everyone else here is marginalized too than that one another’s ships aren’t marginalized enough.

*In talking about ships as representation we generally start with ‘this ship is queer/LGBT’ and then use all other axes of oppression to prove which ship is ‘more progressive’, i.e. - F1nnPoe and Ky1ux are both mlm, but F1nnPoe is more pure because it’s a black man and a Latino man as opposed to two white men. (Occasionally race will also be talked of as the primary point of value, depending on the fandom.)

**On a side note, this whole paragraph is also why it’s unlikely that fandom being ugly will ever cause a show to be cancelled or a pairing will get changed in canon because some fans were nastier than others. We’re like bugs with stingers: scary and painful but ultimately not that impactful (unless you’re allergic, I guess, but forget that part of the metaphor). 

***This is part of where the ‘I have to prove my ship is wholesome/their ship is evil’ stuff comes from: ‘proving’ to creators that your ship is the ‘better’ queer representation because it either covers more marginalized bases or is ‘more pure’, making it less objectionable for mainstream representation. (the joke is that bigots don’t care how pure an LGBT/queer ship is: they’re gonna still think it’s awful because it’s LGBT/queer.)

PS - I don’t think this answer really addresses why arguing about purity of ships is a bad plan, but this is already so long that I’ll address that somewhere else I think.

Getting into the Ivy League: Some Unpopular Opinions

Background: I am an “unhooked” (i.e., upper-middle class Asian-American) Princeton SCEA admit, and these are some of my thoughts on the college admissions process.

Disclaimer: Everything I write below is solely a high schooler’s opinion—I’m by no means in the know, so take everything with a grain of salt.

Overrated elements of a college application:

  • Leadership-Leadership is seen by many as a mark of success in extracurriculars. While it can be immensely valuable, having extensive leadership positions is not necessary: I’m President of exactly one club and one of many officers at my HS literary magazine—and not even Editor-in-Chief at that. 
  • Well-roundedness-My extracurriculars are extremely narrow in scope. They can be divided into exactly two categories: Classics-related activities and writing-related activities. In my opinion, depth of accomplishment (pointiness) is more important than breadth (well-roundedness); above all, passion is more important than objective stats and awards.
  • Teacher recommendations-If you’re an introvert like me, don’t fret. I didn’t click with any of my teachers, and I honestly don’t think it hurt me. That said, there are some ways to get to know them even if you don’t participate/contribute actively in class. Approach them after class; show that you care. For example, I asked my English teacher to provide feedback on my submissions to various writing contests. Also, make sure to supply your recommenders with a “brag sheet” outlining not just your accomplishments but also your goals for the future.
  • Affirmative Action-Being an under-represented minority or first-generation student isn’t as much of a boost as you think it is. Conversely, being Asian or Caucasian isn’t a drawback unless you make it a drawback. I’m privileged to pretty much be the antithesis of a typical “hooked” applicant, and yet I got into some pretty decent schools. Just don’t be a test-taking robot. Set yourself apart. And I don’t mean cultivating uncommon extracurriculars: if you’ve played piano or violin your entire life, that’s great. Show your passion and—this is the important part—try to connect it to something bigger than yourself. Why does it matter in the greater scheme of things? Again, nothing deep. Be genuine, humanize yourself, and you’re good to go.


Underrated elements of a college application:

  • Packaging-Packaging yourself well is paramount. By packaging, I don’t mean planning out your extracurriculars in middle school and doing things that look good on a resume. I’m talking about communicating a cohesive narrative through your application—what do you care about? how will you make an impact to the college community and the world at large? Essays are really helpful vehicles to convey your passions and best qualities.
  • Scores-For most unhooked applicants, there’s a baseline—2100+ and 3.8 GPA—under which it’s very hard to get into a school with a sub-10% acceptance rate. That said, scores only prevent your app from being tossed out; they won’t get you through the door.
Do you know what makes me mad?

I am almost twenty. I am on the verge of real adulthood. I am in college, I am preparing for the rest of my life, I am being exposed to the world.

And I live in a world that hates me.

This is especially relevant to this website– I love tumblr and I have met some of the closest friends I have on here, but this site has also shown me how much the culture I am surrounded by wants to purge me and people like me from it. Let’s make a list:

1. I am a middle-class, well-off white girl in a beautiful neighborhood.
2. I am genetically a girl, and I identify as a girl, and I am straight.
3. I am pro-life, and I support citizens having guns.
4. I am Christian; I don’t cuss, I won’t have sex until I am married, and I don’t like when I see sex or extreme language in film.
5. I support gay rights and gay people because God tells me to show grace and love to everyone, but that part doesn’t matter to anyone because, at the heart of the matter, I believe that sex is between a man and a woman.
6. If you haven’t guessed, I am a Republican.

And there’s the rub. I am a straight white well-off Christian girl in a head spinningly, overwhelmingly liberal world. But Cas, you say, the whole world isn’t liberal! Of course it’s not. But the only people who are allowed to speak are those who lean left. In my experience, which I will admit is limited, but not naive, any opinion that does not fall in line with liberality is crushed and anyone who does not also fall in line is also crushed, and shamed, and cast out, and laughed at.

The world, television, and tumblr especially, have this interesting paradox in which I am told to 1) Express myself and love who I am, and love everyone despite our differences, but also to 2) Conform, or die. Is it only me who can see how glaringly hypocritical this is? “We love everyone no matter what you believe– unless it’s ______.” What does it say about the world we live in that this is acceptable, and even normal? We spend countless hours representing diverse minority groups and rallying and protesting and showing love, but we can’t also take care of those who disagree with us? How does that make sense to anyone at all?

And here we come to the issue of equality, which is the most laughable phrase ever to exist in modern times. Equality used to mean that both sides were equal. Both sides were the same color, the same number, the same amount or quality or anything. 2017 tells us a different story. Equal now means minority groups have the same rights, but their rights are inherently better than the majority’s because we are common, unimpressive, normal, and because they are a minority group and we are not, we are automatically despicable people, if not for real, active discrimination, which is the real thing that should be destroyed, then for simply existing in a greater volume. “Pride, pride, pride”– until it’s straight pride. “Nationalism, patriotism”– until it’s Republican. “Faith, loyalty”– until it’s conservative Christian. We need to shift the meaning of equality back to where it should have always stayed: Both sides stand out equally, and both are loved and accepted equally.

In no way am I saying that I hate gay people or liberals or think that people should have unequal rights. If you have come to that conclusion, please re-read everything before this before continuing.

Oppression is an absolutely terrible thing, and from some of the things that I told you at the beginning of this post, one could assume that I have never experienced oppression before. You would be completely wrong. Do you know how many Trump jokes I’ve heard over the course of my freshman year of college? Do you know how many times I’ve felt insulted, put down, and silenced by my classmates? And do you know how many times someone has defended Trump or any Republican policy in response? You can guess the answer, and it’s definitely not the answer a “privileged” straight white girl would be “expected” to give.

So what do you do about this problem? You say you stand for love, and I’ve just told you that I am being hated– what are you going to do about it? Will our difference of opinion be a wall between two human beings supporting each other? Do you see the problems? Do you see that the other side of the coin is struggling as well? Every building that gets burned down or looted, every anti-Trump, anti-Republican protest, rally, post, sentiment– it has an affect. This isn’t to say, of course, that constructive debate is bad, or that protesting is a bad thing all the time, or that any kind of criticism should be forbidden– my hope is that no one reads this that way. What I am trying to do is to make the world realize that there are more people out there than liberals, that there are people who do support Trump, who do strive to obey God, and who love their country, AND THESE PEOPLE HAVE FEELINGS, JUST LIKE YOU.

So scratch that. This isn’t something that makes me mad, it’s something that infuriates me. The hypocrisy and hatred in this world is overwhelming, and the love that is supposed to connect every human being is corrupt beyond recognition. How do we survive? How do we come out of this on top? The only way to turn this around is love, but it feels like such a far-fetched idea in this culture that I worry for humanity’s safety. I’m struggling not to lose sight of the  glimmer of hope in a population that is blinded by their own sense of righteousness and contempt, but it’s getting dark out there. The world seems to be breaking into nothing more than a cynical series of tactical maneuvers in the biggest civil war the world has ever seen– that of humanity against itself.

Splatoon 2 fan theory thing

OK, so, you know how Marina looks/acts all shy and nervous? 

Well, that could be because she’s an Octoling, and if the first game’s Single-Player Campaign is anything to go by, inklings fucking hate Octolings. now, I’m not saying she’s an enemy of any kind, hell no, but I’m thinking that she’s nervous about being so upfront and public about her being an Octoling. she even looks somewhat nervous when she’s preforming on stage:

And at the end of the news reel, she seems less focus or sure of doing the pose at the end compared to Pearl. 

Things like this could be the reason as to why the internet has taken such a liking to Marina. its almost as if she represents minorities in the real world, and how some are afraid to show who they are or who they feel they are. Maybe, perhaps, this is one of Marina’s first times on stage visible to everyone. Anyways, this was just a little idea I had that I wanted to share.

I think one of the things I appreciate most about Brooklyn 99 is that it has an incredibly diverse cast (the NYPD is actually about 50% minorities, so it’s really nice to see a show that reflects that) AND even more importantly, there are at least two of every minority represented, so nobody has to be a token anything or be representative of their entire ‘group’.

Terry and Captain Holt are both black cops in positions of power, but they have very different leadership strategies and very different interests, hobbies, etc, none of which really hinge on them being ‘black’. Terry loves his children, Holt is not really big on kids. 

Latinas? The actress who plays Diaz was actually shocked she got the role after she heard Melissa Fumero got Santiago–“I thought, ‘That’s it. The network is not going to allow there to be two Latinas in one show,‘” Beatriz said. “I was so used to, ‘There’s only room for one.'” But there doesn’t have to be only one! Santiago and Diaz are literally polar opposite personalities. Diaz is brash and tough, Santiago is a huge authority-pleaser and plays by the book, etc. I believe they also canonically have different countries of origin which ~surprise surprise~, not all Latinx people come from the same place, so one token won’t cover everything!

Gay characters? Even the main gay couple in the cast (Holt and his husband) are both very different from each other, and his husband isn’t just there as like gay window dressing, he’s fleshed out as having his own interests and contributions to the relationship outside of just being ‘gay.’ He’s more of an academic/intellectual and isn’t interested in the whole cop scene, but loves his husband and still supports his career. Furthermore–both of them have been gay and happy married for years. 

Gina Linetti and Jake Peralta? Both Italian. (interestingly enough, both actors are Jewish irl as well) 

While not exactly a minority, even the classic workplace sitcom ‘old fat white guy that everybody makes fun of’ isn’t a one-off token either! Scully and Hitchcock, while very similar, STILL have key differences between them pointed out throughout the show.

I could keep going, but the point is that Brooklyn 99 does a fantastic job of avoiding lazy cultural stereotypes and really trying to build characters. And this is a deliberate move by the showrunners: “You don’t reduce people to one thing in the modern age. That’s our No 1 rule of writing.” 

Nobody has to be a token. Nobody has to be a stereotype. Racial and ethnic and other backgrounds aren’t punchlines, they’re just part of who people are. 

What people don’t understand is that we need to be more critical of media that represents a minority.  Creators have to actively be ready to listen to voices of that minority while they create because of how little actual rep we get. 

They have to be aware that their piece will influence how we are viewed,  gives us a taste of how others view us, and how far our voices can be heard when people write us.

So when games like Dream Daddy come out, get a huge immediate following, and releases we’re going to be hyper critical because this is OUR stories being told. It’s OUR stories being told to a main stream audience. This was a chance to bring attention to our issues. 

- The reality of mlm fathers fighting for adoption/child bearing rights. 

- The reality of the complicated relationship gay people have with religion. 

- Raising a child as an out trans gay man.

- The overall impact of raising a child as a gay person and the possibility of them being harassed for it. The guilt that comes with it, and how some LGBT people (Myself for ex) struggle with the idea of having children for that reason. 


And sure, they could have ignored this too for a fun little silly dating sim…but they went as far too literally never say the word gay once in the game, they never say the word trans once in the game, and the most we get is a vague line from Lucien about his father. 

This game is literally nick named the gay dating dad sim…yet they made no point of actively making these men gay/overall mlm. Of talking about them being MLM fathers. They let a homophobic cult ending that literally calls the MC’s thoughts about another man “sinful” and it got far enough in development that the removal has seemingly broken some paths of the game, an achievement, and is readable in the game files. (And supposed art, but I’ve yet seen this confirmed.) 

And when you’re a gay person who never sees our stories in media outside of two cis white men in their 20s sharing 1 dramatic kiss (MAYBE 2! Gasp!) a series…get this instead. It’s a little disappointing. 

Like it’s an ok dating sim, it has nice touches with the trans rep, and you can tell that some paths were made with lots of love…but overall they could have done better.

TLDR: Dream Daddy cashed in as the “Gay Dad Dating Sim”, goes onto leave everything gay out of it, and makes a homophobic ending that shows how little they listened to LGBT voices while making it. 

Fun Fact 159

Mauritius has a unique parliamentary system whereby only 62 of its 70 seats are up for election. The remaining eight seats are reserved for what are called the “best losers” and are appointed by the Supreme Court to ensure that ethnic and religious minorities are represented.

Tumblr lgbt and shipping culture is so repulsive. People go out of their way to state that every character they like is gay/lesbian/trans and spew hate at anyone who says otherwise. They despise heterosexual relationships and so all characters have to be gay and lesbian, and then the men have to be trans too so it’s not just ‘’Cis Gay White Men’’. And one of them also has to be race-bent as being black just to even it all out and that every single minority is represented and basically is nothing like their original character at all. If you disagree with them and tell them that that character is in fact straight, they’ll get so offended because they’re gay and they ‘’headcanon’’ this character as gay too and you’re basically a homophobe if you say this character isn’t gay. They are offended over people telling them their little imaginary headcanons aren’t real.

One of my headcanons for Crowley and Aziraphale: Their choise of bodies always depended on the period. 

Crowley tends to “wear” what is considered sexy or provocative at the time (maybe a chubby woman, a man with a long beard and long hair, following the last trends in makeup and clothes… all that stuff).

But Aziraphale prefers bodies of people that represent minorities, or people that are being discriminated and need help (I’m sure he had the body of a kid when all the child labor happened…)

anonymous asked:

As an asexual person who is nervous about Bughead, I can say I would've been a little less bitter if Riverdale made him gay and not straight. It'd be less upsetting to lose representation if it went towards representation for someone else who needs it. Cole has said that Jug is not asexual OR aromantic but I'm holding out hope that they might not be blatant about the sex part so I can cling onto the asexuality part. I don't care what people ship, though, and I'm happy for Bughead shippers.

This is exactly the kind of solidarity we need to see more often around here.

Let’s all take example from anon when we feel like to talk about our ship as if it’s the only one that has a right to be. 

We shouldn’t turn this into a huge fight between ships, because at the end of the day that’s not what matters most, the real deal here is representation.

We should try to make of this fandom an example of how supportive a community can be to a minority so little represented as asexuality and all its shades, so that next time, other productions might actually consider portraying more diverse characters