minimum wage $9

Baby boomers worked the 9 to 5.

Millennials work the 7 to 5 for minimum wage, followed by a 8 to 12 split shift with a 6 til close on the pot wash, followed by an open shift which violates your legal minimum time between shifts, followed by…

having a dutch government that gives you a rent cut if you make below a certain amount of money and rent your own place within a certain price range is a big part of it 

that’s how there’s so many studio apartment buildings aimed at students, I pay 400 for my own 330 square ft place in the middle of the city with digital tv, internet & unlimited laundromat use

ASK ME STUFF
  • 1. What is something you always wear, even in the shower?
  • 2. What is your favorite thing to wear to sleep?
  • 3. What is/was your favorite stuffed animal growing up!
  • 4. Have you read any book more than 5 times?
  • 5. How did you feel after your first kiss?
  • 6. What Tempe of underwear do you prefer?
  • 7. What was the first movie you’ve seen in a movie theater?
  • 8. What is your state or country’s minimum wage?
  • 9. What moment in time did you truly feel ‘awe-inspired?’
  • 10. What is your least favorite food?
  • 11. What is your favorite constellation and why?
  • 12. If you could have any hair style you wanted, what would it look like?
  • 13. Gold, silver, or bronze accessories?
  • 14. Do you have any allergies?
  • 15. Do you like the smell of cedar wood?
  • 16. Shower curtain, or door?
  • 17. Do you wear slippers?
  • 18. What is your favorite pattern?
  • 19. Do you watch any big sports games?
  • 20. Can you play any instruments?
  • 21. If you could learn any language that you don’t already know semi-fluently, what would it be?
  • 22. What is your favorite topic in history class?
  • 23. Do you believe in love at first sight?
  • 24. Name one dream that ruined your day when you woke up.
  • 25. Have you ever burned yourself?
  • 26. Do you own a hair dryer?
  • 27. What age did you learn to make toast?
  • 28. What color is the mat in your bathroom?
  • 29. Name something in your bathroom you constantly run out of besides toilet paper.
  • 30. What kind of watch do you wear?
  • 31. How much did the shirt you’re wearing right now cost?
  • 32. Are you still friends with anyone from middle school?
  • 33. Do you hope to advance at your current job?
  • 34. Would you like to marry whoever you’re seeing right now?
  • 35. Have you ever thought to yourself that you’re the luckiest person in the world?
  • 36. What is your favorite color to paint your nails?
  • 37. What time of day do you most enjoy looking at the sky?
  • 38. What is your dream vehicle?
  • 39. What was the best thing you ever did for your parents or legal guardians or parent figures?
  • 40. Have you ever worn a suit?
  • 41. Would you rather make 2d or 3d art?
  • 42. Have you ever made a list of questions for Tumblr?
  • 43. Do you prefer candles or incense?
  • 44. If you marry, would you do a tradition wedding, or get hitched?
  • 45. What is the weirdest thing you’ve done with binder clips?
  • 46. Do you still go trick-or-treating?
  • 47. Have you ever won a costume contest?
  • 48. What is something you’ve done every summer for as long as you can remember?
  • 49. So you touch things for no reason?
  • 50. Do you eat candy corn?

anonymous asked:

What would raising the minimum wage to 15/hour do? I've heard that it's a good thing but it's never really been explained to me

In a nutshell? It would make all our lives better. 

PREPARE MY SOAPBOX, GENTLE READERS, FOR ONCE MORE IT IS TIME FOR ME TO TREAD UPON IT.

Ever hear the term “the working poor”? This is a term used to describe people who are working one or more minimum wage jobs, and are still so poor that many of them have to rely on government assistance to get by. This government assistance comes in the form of welfare, which is paid for by taxes. 

A lot of the working poor work for companies whose CEOs and upper management make thousands of times what their minimum wage employees make. Wal-Mart, for example, paid its CEO $25.6 million last year. And Wal-Mart generously raised its minimum wage this year to… $9 an hour. Meanwhile, last year Wal-Mart reported annual profits of $482 billion. That’s BILLION. With a motherfucking B.

Now here’s where it gets controversial. If deliriously profitable companies like Wally World doubled their minimum wage employees’ pay–say, from $7.50 in some states to $15 an hour–those employees would no longer have to rely on welfare to survive. So less of our tax dollars would go to supporting them.

The more people who are paid a living wage, the fewer people need to rely on tax-funded government assistance. So those tax dollars could get spent on other useful shit, like improving our public schools and repairing our infrastructure (both of which efforts would employ people, btw).

So let’s review:

  • Big companies pay their employees jack shit despite making billions in revenue.
  • The government uses our taxes to help those low-paid employees survive using welfare.
  • If the companies would give their employees raises, those employees would rely less on government assistance.
  • That tax revenue could be used elsewhere to improve our country.

So when people refer to the “welfare state” and “lazy people living off our tax dollars,” who do you think that REALLY means? Is it the working poor? Or is it their fucking employers who pay them so little that we need to subsidize their shitty paychecks?

We the Bitches are in favor of raising the minimum wage because we’re tired of picking up the slack of greedy corporations. As the great philosopher Chris Rock once said, “You know what that means when someone pays you minimum wage? You know what your boss was trying to say? ‘Hey if I could pay you less, I would, but it’s against the law.’”

Ask me stuff, I have zero interaction with my followers.

1. What is something you always wear, even in the shower?
2. What is your favorite thing to wear to sleep?
3. What is/was your favorite stuffed animal growing up!
4. Have you read any book more than 5 times?
5. How did you feel after your first kiss?
6. What Tempe of underwear do you prefer?
7. What was the first movie you’ve seen in a movie theater?
8. What is your state or country’s minimum wage?
9. What moment in time did you truly feel ‘awe-inspired?’
10. What is your least favorite food?
11. What is your favorite constellation and why?
12. If you could have any hair style you wanted, what would it look like?
13. Gold, silver, or bronze accessories?
14. Do you have any allergies?
15. Do you like the smell of cedar wood?
16. Shower curtain, or door?
17. Do you wear slippers?
18. What is your favorite pattern?
19. Do you watch any big sports games?
20. Can you play any instruments?
21. If you could learn any language that you don’t already know semi-fluently, what would it be?
22. What is your favorite topic in history class?
23. Do you believe in love at first sight?
24. Name one dream that ruined your day when you woke up.
25. Have you ever burned yourself?
26. Do you own a hair dryer?
27. What age did you learn to make toast?
28. What color is the mat in your bathroom?
29. Name something in your bathroom you constantly run out of besides toilet paper.
30. What kind of watch do you wear?
31. How much did the shirt you’re wearing right now cost?
32. Are you still friends with anyone from middle school?
33. Do you hope to advance at your current job?
34. Would you like to marry whoever you’re seeing right now?
35. Have you ever thought to yourself that you’re the luckiest person in the world?
36. What is your favorite color to paint your nails?
37. What time of day do you most enjoy looking at the sky?
38. What is your dream vehicle?
39. What was the best thing you ever did for your parents or legal guardians or parent figures?
40. Have you ever worn a suit?
41. Would you rather make 2d or 3d art?
42. Have you ever made a list of questions for Tumblr?
43. Do you prefer candles or incense?
44. If you marry, would you do a tradition wedding, or get hitched?
45. What is the weirdest thing you’ve done with binder clips?
46. Do you still go trick-or-treating?
47. Have you ever won a costume contest?
48. What is something you’ve done every summer for as long as you can remember?
49. So you touch things for no reason?
50. Do you eat candy corn?

Things that need to be done, imo

1. The Church needs to be repaired and reestablished in America. Christianity has become watered down and the saved by grace movement is out of control.

2. The Roe v Wade supreme court decision needs to be viewed as what it is. Unconstitutional. The two things that can happen afterwords is the Fetus can be recognized as a member of the human species and view abortion as murder on the federal level, or it be left to the states.

3. Speed Limits need to be removed. I don’t mean school zones or residential areas. Those are fine, but majority of other speed limits can be tossed as they are really just a tax.

4. The Obergefell v. Hodges supreme court decision (Gay Marriage) needs to be found unconstitutional. The constitution does not protect marriage, so by pure logic the Supreme Court could only get involved with Gays at all if they were being shot or something along those lines.

5. We don’t need more Gun Laws, we need less.

6. School choice needs to be a bigger goal, and an overhaul of the education system is also something that needs to be done, though some of it will be done simply through competition with school choice.

7. State National Guards need to be overhauled. A state needs to be able to defend itself without relying on the overbearing foot of the United States Federal Government.

8. School calendars need to eliminate the summer months, that does not entail more days. The days would simply be more evenly spread out. This could have been added onto number 6, but I feel it is important enough to have its own position.

9. Minimum wage should be abolished, and child labor laws should be lightened. I see no reason why a 14 year-old, with parental consent, can’t work a low paying job to make some extra money. Jobs can teach important lessons. I am not saying get rid of child labor laws in entirety, I am simply saying lighten them. It should definitely be up to the state how light they are.

10. Another education addition, there needs to be an addition of religion to the school systems. By that I mean children should be taught all worldviews and how they interpret the world and make their own choice. This shouldn’t be a dedicated class, this should simply be within the education system in general. When teaching astronomy, their is no pain in teaching both worldviews in a cohesive manner.

11. The NSA, CIA, and FBI need to be made into one branch, and the entire thing needs to be smaller than any of the three we have now. The NSA should really be completely broken up and be done on a state lave, and if that state chooses not to spy on its citizens, then it doesn’t have to. the CIA and FBI can be one cohesive branch with the remnants of the NSA. I would not be opposed to their elimination in the future, but for now downsizing is a good direction.

12. The banks need to be eliminated on a national level, each state can have their own state level banks, but anything above is purely insane.

That is all for now.

Hey everyone!

I just wanted to assure you guys that I am working on the next comic! ;v;)/// The reason it’s taking so long is because the season is pretty much over for my current job (amusement parks don’t stay open in winter :< ) so, I’m trying to find another job asap! 

Thank you for your patience! ;o;)/

Hey so to switch things up here’s an info-graphic I made to sum up something I’ve been thinking about my research on the minimum wage.

Minimum wage research is heavily political.  This is partially due to the theoretical meme that minimum wage increases are unquestionably bad (more on that later but that narrative is based heavily on several assumptions which rarely hold in reality), and partially due to the fact that most research on the topic of the minimum wage is not done by disinterested academics but rather by very much interested think tanks.

Anyways, to show one aspect of this I’m going to talk for a bit about the notion that minimum wage increases only affect teenaged workers.  This is untrue on many grounds–the least of which is that many who work on the bare minimum wage are not teenagers and that many teenagers are the primary income earners of their household, but it is also heavily dependent on what minimum wage increase one is talking about.

The infographic above demonstrates this.  Yet again it is but a simple infographic which does share the presumption that only teenagers work on the bare minimum wage, which isn’t true, but moving on; how large a portion of adults are affected by a minimum wage increase is wholly dependent on what minimum wage you are talking about.  Increasing the minimum wage by ten cents will only affect those working on the bare minimum wage, yes, but few people propose that.  An $8, $9 minimum wage would affect more and more adult workers.

This brings us to the ten dollar wage.  For many, this is the de facto minimum wage for low wage workers, because to quote Chris Rock, “Paying the minimum wage says that if I could legally pay you less, I would”.  Many workers work on a wage of ten dollars an hour, which leads us to one of the main propositions from the left wing of the democrats, the $10.10 minimum wage.

This minimum wage is just as much of a statistical trick as the 7.85 one is, except instead of altering the proposed minimum wage in order to effect as few people as possible, it effects a far larger number.  But this ‘effect’ is very questionable.  For those who work ten dollars an hour at 30 hours a week, a minimum wage of 10.10 increases their income by three dollars a week.  This is an 'effect’ only in the statistical sense, and for that reason the proposal is nonsense.

It’s nonsense for political reasons as well, there is little reason to believe that a 10.10 proposed minimum wage wouldn’t be lowered over negotiations, and it’s symptomatic of the fickleness that the Democrats have shown in negotiations.

The research that led to this realization is basically what began the end of my desire to live as an apolitical civil servant; when even the basics of the research on a topic are political, then what use is it to pretend that one is a disinterested apolitical figure?

Mod R

Good News: Target is Raising It’s Minimum Wage, Finally

Dow Jones reported Wednesday that Target will be raising minimum wage to $9 per hour in April. This comes a month after competitor Wal-Mart announced it would increase its minimum wage to $9 an hour in April and $10 an hour for 2016.

This also comes after advocacy organization UltraViolet put pressure on Target to pay workers better wages, stating that Wal-Mart’s better pay should encourage Target to have better pay.

“If Target were to raise its minimum wage, that could mean close to a million people earning poverty wages will see their salaries increase – and we could see wages rise across industries,” UltraViolet wrote. “But that’s only if we keep the momentum going. Walmart is Target’s biggest competitor – but for a long time Target has relied on Walmart’s poor image to paint it in a more favorable light. Now, Target won’t be able to claim it’s a better workplace, and the more of us who sign the petition, the greater the pressure on Target to do the right thing.”

2

McDonald’s vacates headquarters due to worker protests

Thousands of protesters marched on a McDonald’s campus that houses its Hamburger University training facility, demanding higher wages for workers.

The site of the planned protest was changed after McDonald’s vacated its headquarters in the US state of Illinois after consulting with police.

Protesters want the fast food giant pay a minimum wage of $15 (£9) per hour, double the US federal minimum wage.

The company’s annual shareholder meeting is scheduled for Thursday.

The closure affected one of five McDonald’s corporate buildings and about 3,000 employees.

To the anon suggesting my wand-prices are too high and think I should sell my wands for $10 (6 pounds each), consider the following for each wand in work/time. 

- Sourcing and buying materials for the wand (raw gems aren’t cheap!) 

- Fitting the natural gemstone securely in the wand. 

-Sculpting/free-handing the design accurately. 

-Priming and drying overnight. 

- Hand painting several layers of acrylic paint to get the best colour effect of shadows and highlights. 

- Gold-, Silver- or Copper-leafing (also not cheap!) the accents onto the wand with guilding paste. 

- Sealing the wand with glossy acrylic varnish, drying. 

- Taking good photographs of the wand from every angle. 

- Choosing/editing photographs. 

- Listing the wand in my store with informative and accurate information. 

- Printing invoices, writing address + wrapping wand in bubblewrap and envelope with gift. 

- Going to the post office in my town to send package. 

- Paying Etsy’s fees. 

Consider that I’m a professional SFX-Artist with a university degree in props and special effects with 7 years experience as a cosplayer and prop-maker in addition to that. When you buy my hand-crafted items you are buying a trained skill that I’m $50000 in student debt for learning. My prices are not particularly high and in fact I’ve had to reduce many of them already! You say “people could make this at home with a tutorial” Great! Go do that then and don’t bother me about it? We get it, you hate artists! Now shoo! 

Minimum Wage Mythbusters

Myth 1: Raising the minimum wage will only benefit teens.

Not true: The typical minimum wage worker is not a high-school student earning weekend pocket money. In fact, 88 percent of those who would benefit from a federal minimum wage increase are age 20 or older, and 55 percent are women.



Myth 2: Increasing the minimum wage will cause people to lose their jobs.

Not true: A review of 64 studies on minimum wage increases found no discernable effect on employment. Additionally, more than 600 economists, seven of them Nobel Prize winners in economics, have signed onto a letter in support of raising the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016.



Myth 3: Small business owners can’t afford to pay their workers more, and therefore don’t support an increase in the minimum wage.

Not true: A June 2014 survey found that more than 3 out of 5 small business owners support increasing the minimum wage to $10.10. Small business owners believe that a higher minimum wage would benefit business in important ways: 58% say raising the minimum wage would increase consumer purchasing power. 56% say raising the minimum wage would help the economy. In addition, 53% agree that with a higher minimum wage, businesses would benefit from lower employee turnover, increased productivity and customer satisfaction.



Myth 4: Raising the federal tipped minimum wage ($2.13 per hour since 1991) would hurt restaurants.

Not true: In California, employers are required to pay servers the full minimum wage of $9 per hour - before tips. Even with a recent increase in the minimum wage, the National Restaurant Association projects California restaurant sales will outpace the U.S. average in 2014.



Myth 5: Raising the federal tipped minimum wage ($2.13 per hour since 1991) would lead to restaurant job losses.

Not true: Employers in San Francisco must pay tipped workers the full minimum wage of $10.74 per hour – before tips. Yet, the San Francisco restaurant industry has experienced positive job growth over the past few years according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.



Myth 6: Raising the federal minimum wage won’t benefit workers in states where the hourly minimum rate is already higher than the federal minimum.

Not true: Only 23 states and the District of Columbia currently have a minimum wage higher than the federal minimum, meaning a majority of states have an hourly minimum rate at or below the federal minimum. Increasing the federal minimum wage will boost the earnings for some 28 million low-wage workers nationwide. That includes workers in those states already earning above the current federal minimum. Raising the federal minimum wage is an important part of strengthening the economy. A raise for minimum wage earners will put more money in more families’ pockets, which will be spent on goods and services, stimulating economic growth locally and nationally.



Myth 7: Younger workers don’t have to be paid the minimum wage.

Not true: While there are some exceptions, employers are generally required to pay at least the federal minimum wage. Exceptions allowed include a minimum wage of $4.25 per hour for young workers under the age of 20, but only during their first 90 consecutive calendar days of employment with an employer, and as long as their work does not displace other workers. After 90 consecutive days of employment or the employee reaches 20 years of age, whichever comes first, the employee must receive the current federal minimum wage or the state minimum wage, whichever is higher. There are programs requiring federal certification that allow for payment of less than the full federal minimum wage, but those programs are not limited to the employment of young workers.



Myth 8: Restaurant servers don’t need to be paid the minimum wage since they receive tips.

Not true: An employer can pay a tipped employee as little as $2.13 per hour in direct wages, but only if that amount plus tips equal at least the federal minimum wage and the worker retains all tips and customarily and regularly receives more than $30 a month in tips. Often, an employee’s tips combined with the employer’s direct wages of at least $2.13 an hour do not equal the federal minimum hourly wage. When that occurs, the employer must make up the difference. Some states have minimum wage laws specific to tipped employees. When an employee is subject to both the federal and state wage laws, he or she is entitled to the provisions of each law which provides the greater benefits.



Myth 9: Only part-time workers are paid the minimum wage.

Not true: About 53 percent of all minimum wage earners are full-time workers, and minimum wage workers contributed almost half (46 percent) of their household’s wage and salary income in 2011. Moreover, more than 88 percent of those who would benefit from raising the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 are working adults, and 55 percent are working women.



Myth 10: Increasing the minimum wage is bad for businesses.

Not true: Academic research has shown that higher wages sharply reduce employee turnover which can reduce employment and training costs.



Myth 11: Increasing the minimum wage is bad for the economy.

Not true: Since 1938, the federal minimum wage has been increased 22 times. For more than 75 years, real GDP per capita has steadily increased, even when the minimum wage has been raised.



Myth 12: The federal minimum wage goes up automatically as prices increase.

Not true: While some states have enacted rules in recent years triggering automatic increases in their minimum wages to help them keep up with inflation, the federal minimum wage does not operate in the same manner. An increase in the federal minimum wage requires approval by Congress and the president. However, in his call to gradually increase the current federal minimum wage to $10.10 per hour, President Obama has also called for it to adjust automatically with inflation. Eliminating the requirement of formal congressional action would likely reduce the amount of time between increases, and better help low-income families keep up with rising prices.



Myth 13: The federal minimum wage is higher today than it was when President Reagan took office.

Not true: While the federal minimum wage was only $3.35 per hour in 1981 and is currently $7.25 per hour in real dollars, when adjusted for inflation, the current federal minimum wage would need to be more than $8 per hour to equal its buying power of the early 1980s and more nearly $11 per hour to equal its buying power of the late 1960s. That’s why President Obama is urging Congress to increase the federal minimum wage and give low-wage workers a much-needed boost.



Myth 14: Increasing the minimum wage lacks public support.

Not true: Raising the federal minimum wage is an issue with broad popular support. Polls conducted since February 2013 when President Obama first called on Congress to increase the minimum wage have consistently shown that an overwhelming majority of Americans support an increase.



Myth 15: Increasing the minimum wage will result in job losses for newly hired and unskilled workers in what some call a “last-one-hired-equals-first-one-fired” scenario.

Not true: Minimum wage increases have little to no negative effect on employment as shown in independent studies from economists across the country. Academic research also has shown that higher wages sharply reduce employee turnover which can reduce employment and training costs.



Myth 16: The minimum wage stays the same if Congress doesn’t change it.

Not true: Congress sets the minimum wage, but it doesn’t keep pace with inflation. Because the cost of living is always rising, the value of a new minimum wage begins to fall from the moment it is set.

Cherokee Nation Raises Tribal Minimum Wage, More Than $2 Above Federal

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker signed an executive order on February 21 raising the Cherokee Nation’s minimum wage to $9.50 over the next two years. The current Cherokee Nation minimum wage stands at $9 per hour, already well above the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.


bloomberg.com
Wal-Mart Cuts Some Workers’ Hours After Pay Raise Boosts Costs

Economics does not occur in a vacuum.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc., in the midst of spending $1 billion to raise employees’ wages and give them extra training, has been cutting the number of hours some of them work in a bid to keep costs in check.

Regional executives told store managers at the retailer’s annual holiday planning meeting this month to rein in expenses by cutting worker hours they’ve added beyond those allocated to them based on sales projections.
The request has resulted in some stores trimming hours from their schedules, asking employees to leave shifts early or telling them to take longer lunches, according to more than three dozen employees from around the U.S. The reductions started in the past several weeks, even as many stores enter the busy back-to-school shopping period.

Chief Executive Officer Doug McMillon is trying to balance a desire to improve service – partly through increased spending on his workforce – against investors’ pressure to keep profit growing. Labor costs, which rose after Wal-Mart increased its minimum wage to $9 an hour in April, have weighed on earnings, which missed analysts’ expectations last quarter. At the same time, Wal-Mart is trying to maintain low prices to fend off rivals.

Read the bold section again. Labor costs went up and profits went down after Wal-Mart increased its minimum wage. Shocking.