miners lamp

Top signs that your Himalayan salt lamp is a fake include:

1. Poor Return Policy

Real Himalayan salt lamps are made of salt so it’s not surprising that they’re fragile objects. A good manufacturer knows this and has return policies that are flexible since there could be some damage in transit. If a salt lamp’s maker is extremely strict (like a “NO RETURNS” policy), then it makes you wonder if it’s a scam operation. This might not necessarily be the case, but some fake retailers have been known not to permit any returns because they know they’re not giving you the real thing.

2. Highly Durable

As I just said, Himalayan salt lamps are inherently fragile. Once you own one, you definitely need to be careful not to drop it or bang it into other solid objects because the salt crystal can be damaged very easily. This is actually a rare time when durability is not desirable. If your salt lamp is unaffected by a collision, it could likely be an imposter.

3. Very Bright Light

If all you’re looking for is a bright light source, a salt lamp is not the way to go. Due to its high content of numerous minerals, a Himalayan salt lamp gives off light in an irregular and muffled manner. A true salt lamp does not give off enough light to completely illuminate a room. If yours does, then it’s most likely not the real deal.

4. Inexpensive White Crystal

You’ll typically find Himalayan salt lamps that give off a warm pinkish or orange hue. There is such a thing as a white Himalayan salt lamp, but it’s extremely rare and a lot more pricey than the colored ones. So if you find a white salt crystal lamp that’s not substantially more expensive than the pink/orange versions, steer clear because this is likely an imposter.

5. No Mention of Pakistan

Deep underground mines in Khewra, Pakistan, are the only source of true Himalayan pink salt. If you’re questioning whether you have a real Himalayan salt lamp, look for mention of Pakistan as the salt crystal’s country of origin. You can also ask the lamp’s maker about the salt’s origin, keeping in mind that it may list the country of origin as the location of the lamp’s assembly.

6. Moisture-Resistant

By its inherent nature, salt is an absorber of water. If your salt lamp has no problem being near a moisture source (like a shower), this is a good sign that you own a fake. A true salt lamp is prone to some sweating when exposed to moisture.

7. Not Experiencing Any Benefits

If you’re sure that you bought the appropriately sized salt lamp for the space you’re using it in and you’ve also been exposed to it on a regular basis and don’t see any positive effects whatsoever, then you may not have a real Himalayan salt lamp.

flickr

“More light by CEAG” - Ceag electric miners lamps, Barnsley, UK - catalgue cover, c1939 by mikeyashworth

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />What a great, bold cover to this c1939 CEAG of Barnsley miners lamp catalogue. CEAG, formed in 1912 in the UK, are still in business - they were a familiar name when I was involved in the mining industry in the 1980s and '90s.
3

The light maze and “starry ceiling” in Waterfall isn’t too far from the truth, there are minerals such as sphalerite which can fluoresce for up to 2 minutes after the the source of light energy has been turned off. They glow brilliantly when rubbed or exposed to friction, a property known are triblofluorescence. There are pictures of caves with these minerals and the appearance is stunning. The monsters could use these minerals to create lamps that light up and stay glowing for a tiny bit, enough time to get to the next lantern on the path, in fact it seems that with enough energy in either the form of heat or friction or electricity, or “magical electricity”, you could easily create glowing crystals to dimly light the caves.