mince meat pie

this is short and has no plot at all but it happened in my head so

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Lily Evans walked away from the Ravenclaw common room feeling sufficiently prepared for the Transfiguration exam quickly approaching within the next few days. McGonagall’s tests were a right horror if one attempted to go into them without studying beforehand. She, unlike her nefarious boyfriend James Potter, lacked a natural ability with the subject.

Minding her own thoughts as she strolled, her mind focused more on various laws and theories than the people she passed in the corridor, Lily jolted back to her surroundings when Hogwarts’ infamous headmaster suddenly appeared less than a centimeter in front of her. The sight of him thankfully had her feet stopping on their own accord, otherwise her preoccupied mind wouldn’t have stopped her momentum in time to avoid a messy collision.

“Good afternoon, Miss Evans. I hope your study group session proved beneficial?”

Lily quickly recomposed herself. One must always expect the unexpected in the halls of Hogwarts. She belatedly replied, “Yes, sir. Thorea and Wilbur are both impressively knowledgeable.”

“I’m glad to hear it.” The man pulled lightly on the tip of his neatly trimmed beard. His eyes glinted and he smiled. “Do you happen to know where Mr. Potter is lying about?  I wished to speak with him.”

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If you are eating turkey this Christmas out of some sense of tradition, food historian Ivan Day says, put down that drumstick. After studying English cookbooks hundreds of years old, Day says the giant bird isn’t even that traditional. Besides, he says, “It’s a dry wasteland of flavorless meat.”

Sure, the first turkey came to England in the 1600s. It was an exotic “treat” from the New World. But a time-traveler from Shakespeare’s time wouldn’t understand why everyone in the modern world was having the same dull bird on Christmas night.

At his farmhouse in northern England, Day collects old cookbooks and food illustrations. He says in olden days, Christmas celebrations were all about novelty and variety. The tables of the rich might include a turkey and a goose, but also peacocks, swans, partridges and plovers. A rack of venison would sit beside a giant turtle. The eating would go on for days.

Big, Bold, Wild: We Re-Create Christmas Dinners Of Centuries Past

Photos: Rich Preston