milwaukee-road

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(via MILW Boxcar 2113 | Milwaukee Road boxcar 2113 in BN’s Cicero… | Flickr)

Milwaukee Road boxcar 2113 in BN’s Cicero, Illinois yard in October 1979. Kodachrome by Chuck Zeiler.  

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Milwaukee Rd E-9 commuter train Sept 1973 Jct A-2 by Mark LLanuza
Via Flickr:
Its rush hour time at tower A-2 Western Ave bridge Milwaukee Rd E-9 with a six car Elgin bound train

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Milwaukee Road No. 261 by Dan Grudzielanek
Via Flickr:
The Milwaukee Road 261 at Milwaukee. 6/21/2004

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(via Vintage Amtrak | Ex GN/BN F7 9728 leads an Amtrak Milwaukee … | Flickr)

Caption: “Ex GN/BN F7 9728 leads an Amtrak Milwaukee train, with a Milwaukee Road Dynamometer car at Techny, Illinois in October 1972.”

Photo by Lou Gerard

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E-Unit Nose by Robert Thomson
Via Flickr:
The nose of MILW E9A 36A (ex-MRL 36, xx-INRD 100, nee-MILW 36A) on static display at Deer Lodge, Montana on October 22, 2015. Samsung Galaxy S5

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MILW F-M H-16-66 524 by Chuck Zeiler
Via Flickr:
Milwaukee Road F-M H-16-66 524 at Escanaba, Michigan on November 9, 1975, Kodachrome by J. H. Nixon, Chuck Zeiler collection. There is conflicting information about this locomotive, the following is from the book, ‘Faribanks-Morse Locomotives In Color’, by Jim Boyd: The Milwaukee Road was one of only four customers to buy the H-16-66 Baby Trainmasters from Fairbanks-Morse. They were delivered in two batches, numbers 2125-2127 ( later 550-552 ) were built during August-September 1953, and 2128-2130 ( later, 553-555, later still 547-549 ) were built during September 1953, and all were classed 16-FRS-6 by the Milwaukee. Somehow, the second batch had lower construction ( serial ) numbers. The book does not connect this road number to any previous number, but the book, “Milwaukee Road Locomotives, Volume Three”, by Thomas J. Strauss, states this locomotive was built in September 1953 as 2128 ( c/n 16L693 ), renumbered to 553, then 547, then 524, equipped with MU connections at both ends, no dynamic brakes. Only 60 H16-66’s were built, with the C&NW owning 50, the Milwaukee owning eight, Alcoa owning one, and TVA owning one.

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MILW U36C 8500 brand new at Bensenville by James Lewnard
Via Flickr:
Caption” An Erie Lackawanna transfer brought brand new Milwaukee Road U36C 8500 to Bensenville, where the roundhouse crew set the unit up for service. On June 26, 1972, I called a crew for a Bensenville to Savanna freight with 8500 and 8502 for power. The units spent a few days serving in Illinois before being sent to the West Coast lines.”

Photo by Jim Lewnard

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9-unit Chicago Central train@East Dubuque tunnel/swing bridge

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(via Milwaukee Road at Wallace Press 5-7-86 108 | Milwaukee Road … | Flickr)

Caption: “Milwaukee Road C&E South Line (Kingsbury Branch) switcher at Wallace Press, which in this era was the southern-most customer on the branch, 5-7-86. I’m standing under the Ohio Street expressway entrance, at the corner of Kingsbury and Ohio looking south. The Wallace Press building is still there today, converted to condos, and the buildings across Kingsbury are also still there. However, there are now a number of high-rise condos in this same view, and few clues to suggest that the railroad ever came through here.”

Chicago

May 7, 1986

Photo by John Smatlak

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IMG009 by Joseph Petric
Via Flickr:
On a cold night in February 1969, the Milwaukee Road Skytop lounge cars for both Morning and Afternoon Hiawathas, were caught at the Minneapolis coach yard. Four photographers from Illinois were able to get this shot.

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Near milepost 51 on Interstate 90 in western Montana. When the Milwaukee Road built through this land (1906-1909) it was considered extreme wilderness approaching the Idaho state boarder. Material and supplies had to be brought in by wagon train or, if fortunate enough, by rail from the Northern Pacific Railroad which might be in close proximity. When the US government undertook the task of building the highways and later the US Interstate Systems into the far reaches of the Western United States they had the railroads to haul material, men and supplies in large quantities. Several US Highways and Interstate Highways followed in the footsteps of the early railroads when searching for a route across the landscape. Here, near Superior, MT the Interstate follows the trail blazed by the Milwaukee Road nearly a century before. In July of 1973 an eastbound Milwaukee train led by two “Little Joe” electrics rumbles along the old grade while automobiles and trucks begin enjoying smooth travel over new I-90. Four-plus decades later and the railroad has fallen away, replaced by the concrete pad that carries vehicles over it at 80+mph.

If you’re interested in finding this location on google maps, i spent the twenty minutes for you and found it myself. 

https://www.google.com/maps/search/Superior+Heating+Superior,+MT/@47.1536881,-114.8322797,3a,60y,354.73h,82.83t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sqVm7iKi-EPccJbhQB6OoWA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

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Top: “Milwaukee Road’s Morning Hiawatha has just left Chicago Union Station on a northerly course, but now has completed a sharp westerly turn to cross under the C&NW tracks heading into North Western Station, and over Clinton Street, about halfway between Fulton and Kinzie.”

Bottom: “The Morning Hiawatha is now headed west towards Minneapolis, but not on exclusively Milwaukee Road rails. These are the joint tracks of the PRR and the Milwaukee. The position light signal, the head of which is showing above that last car, and another one, the back of which is beyond the Milwaukee Avenue viaduct, signify the PRR’s part-ownership.”

Chicago

April 2, 1971

Photos by Paul Enenbach

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‘Hiawatha’ makes ready, 1943 by Michael Ryerson
Via Flickr:
January 1943. “Chicago Union Station. Streamliner 'Hiawatha’ ready to depart the Chicago, Milwaukee, Saint Paul & Pacific platform on the north side of the station.” Photo by Jack Delano, Office of War Information. Shorpy

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(via Noses | Erie Lackawanna E8 810 and Milwaukee Road FP7 104-C … | Flickr)

Caption: “Erie Lackawanna E8 810 and Milwaukee Road FP7 104-C nose off on the east end of the Milwaukee Road’s Bensenville Yard in June 1975.”

Bensenville, Illinois

Photo by Lou Gerard