the baby boomer who made this probably:  Those damn millennials and their Pokemon Go giving them another excuse to stare at their phone all day!! How can I capitalize on this craze and show how bitter i am towards millennials at the time? *draws this with the bitterness in their soul* 

Thus Began the Reign of the Millennials

2015 is the first year that the Millennial generation makes up more of the voting age population than any other generation.  

That is why the older generation is trying to suppress your vote. They know that you can change the world they destroyed.

The first step we should take is getting Bernie Sanders elected President of the United States. We should show the world that we refuse to stand aside while an older and smaller generation insists on the destruction of our Democracy.

This is just the beginning, This is the first year we have as the largest voting generation in US History.  

Let’s make the most of it.

vine

do they EVER put down their phones??

Dear Millennials,

Do you hate the way Baby Boomers talk about you?  Well, I want you to remember something:

The Baby Boomers were also the generation of the Hippies.  And the so-called Greatest Generation said the exact same things about the Baby Boomers as the Baby Boomers say about Millennials.

The exact same things.  The only thing missing was the word “selfie”.

Hippies/Baby Boomers were called lazy and entitled.  They were called selfish and self-important.  They were treated as if they didn’t know how to work or show proper respect for their elders and everybody thought that they wanted some sort of special treatment.  The Baby Boomers were perceived as this group who thought everything was all about them.  If you asked the Baby Boomer Hippies, at the time, they’d say they were just exploring sexuality and fighting racism and trying to do away with the old ways because the old ways weren’t working.  They fought and they protested and they were passionate.

Then, to borrow a phrase from The Dark Knight, “you either die a hero or you live long enough to see yourself become a villain.”  That’s what happened to the Baby Boomers.  But, there’s a third option.

Remember.

Remember what this feels like.  Remember what it’s like to be in your teens and twenties.  Remember that it’s not easy.  Remember everything the past generation says about you.

Because there will come a day when the Millennials are in their 30s and 40s and 50s.  Where the President and Congress will all be Millennials.  Where you will be the establishment.  You will be in charge.

And there will be people of your generation, your age group, who will look at the Post-Millennials and say “Look at how selfish and disrespectful they are!  What is wrong with their music?  What is wrong with their hair?  They can’t be separated from their technology for one second, can they?!  People in my generation knew how to work hard!  They weren’t lazy and entitled like these kids are!”

It will happen.  Don’t let it.

Fight it.  Fight for yourselves now but, when you’re older, fight for the next generation.

Break the cycle.

If you hate the way you’re treated by the older generation and the media, then remember that and don’t do it to the ones who come after you.

The Fraud of the New “Family-Friendly” Work

Netflix just announced it’s offering paid leave to new mothers and fathers for the first year after the birth or adoption of a child. Other high-tech firms are close behind.

Some big law firms are also getting into the act. Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe is offering 22 paid weeks off for both male and female attorneys.

Even Wall Street is taking baby steps in the direction of family-friendly work. Goldman Sachs just doubled paid parental leave to four weeks

All this should be welcome news. Millennials now constitute the largest segment of the American work force. Many are just forming families, so the new family-friendly policies seem ideally timed.

But before we celebrate the dawn of a new era, keep two basic truths in mind.

First, these new policies apply only to a tiny group considered “talent” – highly educated and in high demand.

They’re getting whatever perks firms can throw at them in order to recruit and keep them.

“Netflix’s continued success hinges on us competing for and keeping the most talented individuals in their field,” writes Tawni Cranz, Netflix’s chief talent officer.

That Neflix has a “chief talent officer” tells you a lot.

Netflix’s new policy doesn’t apply to all Netflix employees, by the way. Those in Netflix’s DVD division aren’t covered. They’re not “talent.”

They’re like the vast majority of American workers – considered easily replaceable.

Employers treat replaceable workers as costs to be cut, not as assets to be developed.

Replaceable workers almost never get paid family leave, they get a few paid sick days, and barely any vacation time.

If such replaceables are eligible for 12 weeks of family leave it’s only because the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (which I am proud to have implemented when labor secretary under Bill Clinton) requires it.

But Family and Medical leave time doesn’t come with pay – which is why only 40 percent of eligible workers can afford to use it. And it doesn’t cover companies or franchisees with fewer than 50 employees.

Almost all other advanced nations provide three or four months paid leave – to fathers as well as mothers. Plus paid sick leave, generous vacation time, and limits on how many work hours employers can demand.  

The second thing to know about the new family-friendly work policies is that relatively few talented millennials are taking advantage of them.

They can’t take the time.

One of my former Berkeley students who’s now at a tech firm across the Bay told me he’s working fifteen-hour days.

Another, who’s at a Washington law firm, said she’s on call 24-7. Emails often arrive past midnight, followed by text messages asking why the emails haven’t been answered.

These young men won’t take paternity leave and these young women won’t even get pregnant – because it looks bad.

Forget work-life balance. It’s work-as-life.

A recent New York Times story about Amazon reports that when young workers hit the wall from the unrelenting pace, they’re told to climb it.  

Why do the talented millennials work so hard?

Partly because being promoted – getting more equity, running a division, making partner – promises such vast rewards. Vaster rewards than any generation before them has ever been offered.  

Also, you’re either on the fast track or you’re on a dead-end road.

“I’ve got to show total dedication,” one of my former students explained. “It’s all or nothing.”

Which is why millennial men – who research shows have more egalitarian attitudes about family and gender roles than their predecessors – are nonetheless failing to live up to their values once they hit the treadmills.

It’s also why women on such high-powered career tracks are delaying or ultimately giving up on being mothers. 

Or they’re giving up on the fast track.

After the collapse of 2000, the share of women working in high tech dropped sharply. And although tech recovered, female participation is still 6 percent lower than in 1998.

If they’re lucky, women on the fast track can afford to buy their way to motherhood. Marissa Mayer, appointed Yahoo’s CEO while six months pregnant, was back at her desk two weeks later.

It’s possible for such women to have it all – to “lean in” as Sheryl Sandberg puts it – only because they have enough resources for 24-hour childcare, car service for the kids and nannies, and all the extra help needed.

I’m delighted Netflix and other high-powered firms are offering family-friendly work.

But I take most of it with a grain of silicon. So should you.