military-pilot

i-do-what-i-want-im-punkrock  asked:

How hard is it to become an austronaut? I want to start to studie astrophysics and I don't know if I'll ever get any kind of job. Do you have any tips for people like me?

Astrophysics is a perfect field for pursuing any work at NASA!  A degree in a STEM field is a requirement of becoming an astronaut, but other than that there are many possibilities.  One of the best things about the astronaut office is its diversity.  We are scientists, engineers, military pilots, flight test engineers, medical doctors, etc. etc. My biggest tip is to ensure you are pursuing what it is you are passionate about as that’s the only way to truly become exceptional at what you are doing, and most importantly, to be happy doing it.  Passion, hard work, and dedication will get you there.  Good luck!

Headcanon that when the Falconers need a quick one-syllable word to refer to Jack, but don’t want to use that name, they call him “Nerd”.

(I have a friend whose military callsign as a pilot is “Nerd”. RCAF personal callsigns are undignified things given you by other pilots, ideally a diminutive of your surname or referencing something embarrassing you did once, and when they get downtime they always see her reading thick history books for fun. So. “Nerd.” And this isn’t the first time I’ve been struck by how similar Canadian Armed Forces culture is to hockey culture.)

It happens organically.  “What’cha reading, nerd?” and “Enjoy your computer date, nerd.”  Pretty soon it’s not an epithet, it’s a name. “Nerd! Heads up!” and “Nerd, I’m open!” and “There ya go, Nerd!”  It’s who he is to them. “Can’t read that? Get Nerd to do it, he has an Ivy League education.”  “Nerd, why the fuck isn’t Toronto the capital?”  “When did Orr’s record get beat? Where’s Nerd, he would know.”

Jack loves it. All his life, he was The Jock. Now he’s carved out an identity for himself that’s something entirely different.

Headcanon time because there’s next to no info about Reyes and I’m Desperate: 

I was trawling through the ME wiki and came across a system in the Eagle Nebula called Amun. The system and the planets within are all named after figures or places in Egyptian mythology and history. There’s Anhur, Bast, Neith, Sekhmet, and Sobek. The system is mostly home to Batarians and humans. 

From 2176 to 2178, the system was the site of the Anhur Rebellions, a civil war that broke out when corrupt politicians and corporations basically relegalised slavery because Batarian legal slavery posed an economic threat. So, you got the mostly Batarian Na'hesit, who, ofc, wanted to keep slavery around, VS the rebels, who wanted to abolish slavery. 

WHICH brings me to my dude, Reyes Vidal. 

Firstly, we know that he used to be a shuttle pilot under the call sign Anubis, a god associated with, among other roles, guiding souls in Egyptian mythology. So ‘Anubis’ is interesting because I feel like that’s not really a name you’d use if you were everyday civilian transport. But it does sound like something you’d use if you were, say, a pilot in a war. Additionally, I have learnt that aviator call signs are given to military pilots in RL and can be inspired by things such as personality traits, historical figures, or the pilot’s exploits. 

Secondly, I think we can safely assume that he’s been in the business of smuggling, spying, and being a shady bastard for a while now. 

Thirdly, Reyes’ writer, Courtney Woods, has said that he’s in his late 20s. Let’s say he’s 28/29 and born in 2156 so he was about 19/20 in 2176. Basically, I’m fairly certain that he was alive back then. 

Fourthly, as not-exactly-good as he is, we know that he’s not a big fan of people with power who shit on people without power. 

Conclusion: Reyes Vidal was born in 2156 in the city of New Thebes on the planet Anhur in the Amun system of the Eagle Nebula. When he was 19, civil war broke out in the city after months of unrest between those who opposed the relegalisation of slavery and those who supported it. The fighting quickly swept across the entire system. 

A pretty good flier and not particularly keen on the idea of being enslaved, Reyes chose to join the rebels. He was given an N-503 shuttle and a weapon and told to get to it. 

Reyes wasn’t on the front lines and didn’t see much of the main fight. His job mostly involved smuggling supplies- food, medi-gel, ammo- across enemy lines, and if he could take out a few Na'hesit lackeys while he was at it, well, that was good too. 

During the war, Eclipse mercs found slave camps on Sobek’s moon, Heqet. He, along with others, helped to move people from Heqet to rebel-controlled safe houses. Subsequently, Reyes was given the call sign Anubis, ‘a ferrier of souls’. They really like Egyptian mythology in Amun. 

When the war ended in 2178, if you weren’t a rebel leader or dead, you disappeared into obscurity. So, after a brief stint as a rebel, Reyes Vidal was left very skilled at smuggling and very low on credits and we all know what happens seven years later.

In-depth: the Lanchester & Sten

After the British Expeditionary Force’s retreat from Dunkirk in June 1940, Germany was expected to attempt a full-scale invasion of Britain. In order to accomplish this, they would need to eliminate the Royal Air Force, and as such, the RAF’s airfields were at serious risk. The RAF wanted a Schmeisser-type submachine gun issued to their personnel in the event of an attack from German paratroopers. The Navy had already ordered 2000 Smith & Wesson 9mm carbines and the Army, who by now had realized that they had vastly underestimated the military effectiveness of the submachine gun, began buying Thompsons from the United States.


The Biwarip machine carbine, an early precursor to the Sten made in 1938 and tested by the Small Arms Committee. Remarkably modern for its time.


The RAF initially examined captured MP-38s and ordered 10,000 British-made copies, but there were complications that resulted not only in the weapons being changed from copies of the MP-38 to the MP-28, but also the order being increased to 50,000 to satisfy the Navy as well, who had been forced to abandon the S&W carbines due to serious malfunctions. Sterling Armaments Co. was contracted to produce the initial prototypes of the MP-28 copy. The resultant weapon was finished, in the form of two pilot guns, in late 1940 and demonstrated on the 8th of November. The pilot guns were designed by George Lanchester and thus were named after him.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 3. For whatever reason, this model appears to have no rear sights. It was tested in November 1940.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 4. This is the model used for endurance trials and was essentially the finished product. Tested on the 28th of November 1940.


The Lanchester pilot guns were tested again on the 13th of November 1940 and were tested with a variety of 9x19mm catridges, including Winchester flat-nose, ICI, Bergmann, Beretta, and German military issue. The first pilot gun failed to discharge the Winchester and ICI ammunition, but the second did not run into any major issues and was considered on-par with the German MP-38.

On November 28th, further trials of the Lanchester pilot guns took place in the presence of both George Lanchester and Major Reginald V. Shepherd of the Design Department at RSAF Enfield. The Lanchester was now in its fourth pilot gun form and fired 5204 rounds with 26 stoppages. It passed all the mandatory tests but did not function when loaded with Beretta-made ammunition. Otherwise it was considered good to go and production rights were handed over to the Royal Navy for immediate manufacture as the Lanchester Mk.I. This weapon was issued to the Air Force and Navy until 1941, when it was simplified as the Mk.I*, which had no fire selector and fixed iron sights.


The Lanchester Mk.I. Known as the “British Schmeisser”. It was heavy, sturdy, and solidly built - typical of Naval manufacture.


The Lanchester Mk.I*. Fully-automatic only with fixed iron sights. Many Mk.I*s were simply modified Mk.Is, but were not marked as such.


The Lanchester was good but production costs were too high to equip the army. Something cheaper and quicker to manufacture was sought. In January 1941, an extremely simplified model was designed by George Lanchester and demonstrated at Enfield on the 10th of January 1941, and at Hythe on the 21st. The prototype was essentially a Lanchester stripped down to the bare minimum. It consisted of a simple tubular body made from steel and grips made from Tufnel. It was supposed to have a folding buttstock but for whatever reason this was never fitted. The only real change to the base design was the inclusion of a fire selector just in front of the trigger grouping. Otherwise it was internally the same as the Lanchester Mk.I.

A second simplified prototype was also conceived by George Lanchester and differed in that the cocking slot was now on the left side of the gun and had a much lighter bolt which was about an inch shorter than the original. The grips were redesigned to be more ergonomic, and a simple single-strut stock was fitted to the rear of the pistol grip.


The first simplified Lanchester prototype. Essentially the forerunner to the Sten. The cocking slot has a safety recess.


The second simplified Lanchester prototype. This version had left-hand cocking and a three-position fire selector.


Both simplified prototypes of the Lanchester were tested but rejected. But from this concept, the Sten was born. It was developed in early 1941 by Major Shepherd and Harold J. Turpin, who worked at the Design Department at Enfield. Thus the weapon was christened the STEN (Shepherd, Turpin, ENfield). The design was an incredibly simple blowback system based on the Lanchester with a fixed firing pin and simple cylindrical bolt. The first version of the Sten, the Mk.I, had wooden furniture, a conical flash hider, and a hinged fore grip, a feature not seen on any of the subsequent models. The Mk.I was cheaper than the Lanchester but still too expensive; it was simplified further as the Mk.I* in late 1941. The Mk.I* ditched the wooden embellishments, the flash hider and the fore grip feature. Throughout 1941, over 100,000 Mk.I and Mk.I* Stens were produced and issued to the army.


The Sten Mk.I. The original model of the Sten, with features such as a folding fore grip and a flash hider that were not seen in later models.


The Sten Mk.I*. The first of many steps to simplifying an already very basic gun. Although production was somewhat brief, thousands were made.


In mid-1941, the Mk.II Sten was designed. It was a bare-bones version of a gun which was already very basic. The main difference between the Mk.I and the Mk.II Stens was that the Mk.II had a new barrel that could not be interchanged with the original Mk.I barrel. The Mk.II barrel had only two grooves whereas the Mk.I had six. Externally, the Mk.II was incredibly minimalist. There were two main versions of the Mk.II produced: one with a wireframe stock and one with a single-strut stock. Neither were particularly pleasant to shoot, owing to the poor ergonomics. The upshot of all this was that the Mk.II Sten was incredibly cheap to produce en masse for the army and, as an added bonus, proved very easy for anti-Nazi partisans to copy in workshops.

The Mk.II Sten was tested at Pendine on from the 7th to the 25th of August 1941 and a glaring fault was discovered. The magazines were made from stamped sheet metal, which meant that the feed lips were prone to failure. If the magazine feed lips were misaligned even slightly with the magazine well, the gun would jam. The magazines were also highly susceptible to dirt and sand. All of this basically meant that the Mk.II Sten was highly unreliable if not handled with care, and even then it was probably inevitable that it would fail at some point during the heat of battle. But the army was faced with a choice between a mass of unreliable Mk.IIs, or a handful of Thompsons, Lanchesters and Mk.I Stens. They opted for the former.


The Sten Mk.II. The most successful version of the Sten, with several millions being manufactured during the war and used by various countries.


The Sten Mk.II with bayonet and single-strut stock.


Prototype T42 submachine gun, based on the Sten Mk.II. It had a single-column magazine and a redesigned trigger group.



Sten Mk.II with SMLE stock. This was made as an experimental model only and never issued.


Sten Mk.II with wireframe pistol grip, designed for paratroopers.


Copy of the Sten Mk.II made in a workshop by Danish partisans.


The Mk.II Sten was by far the most successful model of the Sten gun, with over 2,000,000 being produced throughout World War II. It was first issued to British and Canadian troops during the raid on Dieppe on the 19th of August 1942 and continued to be issued until 1945. It was also issued in considerable numbers to the Free French Forces, including the French Resistance.

In 1943, the toy manufacturer Line Brothers Ltd. were contracted to produce the Mk.III Sten, which was made from a single, riveted sheet metal tube that was welded at the top. The ejection also had an extra safety precaution that consisted of a simple finger guard. The barrel was fixed inside the tubular body, which could not be disassembled. In Canada, the Mk.III was manufactured by Long Branch Arsenal.


The Sten Mk.III. Manufactured by Line Bros. Yet another simplification to lower the cost of manufacture.


On the other hand, this prototype Mk.III with a wooden SMLE-style stock would have been substantially more expensive to manufacture.


An experimental Mk.III made at Enfield. The trigger grouping is level with the ejection and the cocking handle is on top.


The Mk.IV was the only one of the Sten “marks” not to be issued to the army. In fact, it never evolved past the prototype stage. It was designed in 1943 with paratroopers in mind, with a shorter barrel and folding stock. The first version of the Mk.IV had a conical flash hider and a very unusual pistol grip and trigger guard arrangement that was designed to facilitate for thick winter gloves. It was a mere 27 inches in length. After it was trialed at Pendine at rejected for improvements, a second version known as the Mk.IVB was developed which was designed to be fired with one hand. To achieve this, the balance of the weapon was changed by moving the trigger grouping forward to the middle of the gun. The trigger mechanism had to be completely redesigned to allow this. It was 24 inches in length but uncomfortable to fire. Besides its flaws, there was no immediate requirement for the Mk.IV model so it was never developed any further.


The Sten Mk.IV. Produced as a prototype only. It was designed for paratroopers and soldiers operating in cold weather conditions.


The Sten Mk.IVB. Designed to be fired one-handed. The shortest version of the Sten by far, it was more a machine pistol than a submachine gun.


The Sten Mk.IVS. A silenced prototype of which only one was ever made.


In 1944, the Mk.V Sten appeared. It was a much more presentable weapon and a far cry from the crude Mk.II  The Mk.V featured a wooden butt, pistol grip and fore grip. The fore grip was ditched in later models. The front sights were also redesigned and lifted from the No.4 SMLE service rifle. Internally, the bolt was improved with a cutaway that cleared the trigger disconnector when the bolt came over the sear. The resultant weapon was of excellent quality and made to a much higher standard than its precursors. Unfortunately, cheaply-made magazine were still being issued and consequently the Mk.V was still just as liable to failure as the earlier models, although this was not the fault of the gun itself.

The Mk.V Sten was issued extensively to paratroopers after D-Day and saw considerable use during Operation Market Garden in Arnhem, and issue of the Mk.V continued until the war in Europe ended in May 1945.


An early model Mk.V. This version had a fore grip which was not seen on later models. The stock could be detached for paratroopers.


The Sten Mk.V. The most polished version of the Sten manufactured during the war. It was much more reliable than the Mk.II and was issued in 1944.


Many variations of silenced Sten guns were also developed. British interest in silenced weapons began in 1940 when British Commandos demanded a quiet gun for eliminating lone sentries during covert raids. Initially they were issued silenced Thompsons made by RSAF Enfield, but these were too heavy and expensive to deploy in any numbers. When the Sten Mk.II appeared, Enfield developed a suppressed model called the Mk.IIS. It was designed by a Polish exile who was now serving with the Special Operations Executive, Lt. Kulikowski. The suppressor consisted of a series of metal cups wrapped around and in front of the barrel, with a rubber plug at the end. When the weapon was fired, the gases seeped out the sidewall of the barrel and their energy dissipated. The bullet traveled through the metal cups and penetrated the plug, which prevented the gases from escaping. These metal cups were encased in a perforated jacket which was surrounded by an additional jacket.


Prototype Mk.IIS. The silencer contained 24 baffles. With so much weight at the front end and so little in the stock, it would have been awkward to handle.


The Sten Mk.IIS. The most successful silenced weapon of World War II.


The Mk.IIS was issued to Commandos, the SOE, and other British special forces units, as well as resistance fighters across Europe. It was designed to be fired in single shots. Reportedly, the sound of the bolt was louder than the gunshot itself. The main drawback of the Mk.IIS was that it had an effective range of only 100 meters.


Sten Mk.II with an SOE-made silencer and basic wooden stock, issued to special agents in France.


The Sten Mk.VI. Basically the Mk.IIS principle applied to the Sten Mk.V. It replaced the Mk.IIS late in the war.


Late in the war, the Mk.V Sten was successfully silenced using a similar principle and this model was called the Mk.VI. It did not see as much use as the Mk.IIS but was probably, all factors considered, the best silenced weapon of the war. It was succeeded by the Sterling L34A1 silent submachine gun.

4

Oddly enough, Kate Rubins journey to space started in central Africa.

“If you put your finger on a map in the middle of Africa, that’s about where our field site was located,” says Rubins, a microbiologist as well as an astronaut.

It was 2007, and an airplane touching down on a grass runway in the Democratic Republic of the Congo had brought Rubins and her colleagues to study a nasty outbreak of monkey pox in a remote village. She’d already spent time studying HIV, Ebola and smallpox in the lab.

This time the airplane wouldn’t be back for six weeks.

Rubins didn’t know it at the time, but that remote expedition gave her experience she’d eventually draw on during a much bigger journey — to outer space. And while, she doesn’t fit the normal astronaut profile. Many start out as military pilots, engineers or doctors — not microbiologists studying viruses. But she got the job.


A Microbe Hunter Plies Her Trade In Space

Photo by NASA Johnson/Flickr and NASA

The World’s worst mid-air collisions

While you’d imagine that with an almost limitless sky, collisions between aircraft should be almost impossible, the reality is that nothing is shorter than a straight line, and as such the skies are filled with a sort of invisible highways, pre-established flight paths between airports that all aircraft have to follow to get from point A to B in the most efficient, quick manner, this is why the following accidents managed to take place:

Charkhi Dadri mid-air collision

On 12 November 1996 over the village of Charkhi Dadri, to the west of New Delhi, India, two commercial aircraft, Saudi Arabian Airlines Flight 763, a
Boeing 747-100B, and Kazakhstan Airlines Flight 1907, a Ilyushin Il-76TD, collided in the approach path of Delhi’s airport, a narrow flight path used to both departures and arrivals, where a combination of pilot error on behalf of the Kazakh aircraft, lack of a modern radar in Delhi, and the airports extremely congested approach path lead to the loss of 349 people on board both planes, becoming the third deadliest aviation accident in history. 

Dniprodzerzhynsk mid-air collision

On 11 August 1979 over Ukraine, near the city formerly named Dniprodzerzhynsk, two Tupolev Tu-134A’s on scheduled domestic passenger flights, and both operated by Aeroflot, Aeroflot 65816 and Aeroflot 65735, collided while on cruise flight after an overworked and understaffed air traffic control made a series of communication and direction mistakes, ultimately culminating in a break down of communication and the subsequent crash, killing all 178 people on board both airliners.

Zagreb mid-air collision

On 10 September 1976, British Airways Flight 476, a Hawker Siddeley Trident, collided mid-air near Zagreb, Yugoslavia (now Croatia), with Inex-Adria Aviopromet Flight 550, a Douglas DC-9. The collision was the result of a procedural error on the part of Zagreb air traffic controllers, a combination of bad coordination and use of improper radio language, leading to the loss of all 176 people on board both planes. 

All Nippon Airways Flight 58


On 30 July 1971, a Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) Mitsubishi F-86F Sabre fighter jet collided with an All Nippon Airways Boeing 727-200 airliner, causing both aircraft to crash. All 162 occupants of the airliner were killed, while the Sabre pilot, a trainee with the JASDF, ejected before the collision and survived. The crash occurred after the fighter pilot, Technical Sergeant Yoshimi Ichikawa , which was practicing air combat maneuvers with his instructor in another Sabre, failed to monitor the air traffic around him, until his instructor realized the impending collision and ordered him to break away from the airliner, an order that came too late. 

Libyan Arab Airlines Flight 1103

On 22 December 1992, a Libyan Arab Airlines Boeing 727-200 took off from Benina International Airport near Benghazi on a domestic flight to Tripoli International Airport. At an altitude of 3,500 ft (1,067 m) during the aircraft’s approach to Tripoli airport, the aircraft disintegrated after allegely colliding with a Libyan Air Force’s MiG-23, resulting in the death of all 157 passengers and crew on the airliner, while the 2-man crew of the MiG ejected. 

This one, while still being classified as a mid-air collision, but after the fall of Gaddafi, the military pilot involved claims the airliner was ordered shot down by Gaddafi himself, in an attempt to show the west the consequences of the embargo imposed on Libya after the bombing of Pan Am flight 103.

Gol Transportes Aéreos Flight 1907

On 29 September 2006, a Gol Transportes Aeréos Boeing 737-800 collided in midair with an Embraer Legacy 600 business jet over the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso. All 154 passengers and crew aboard the Boeing 737 died when the aircraft broke up in midair and crashed into an area of dense jungle, while the Embraer Legacy, despite sustaining serious damage to its left wing and tail, landed safely with its seven occupants uninjured. The accident was caused by errors committed both by air traffic controllers, further compounded by lack of radar coverage over the area of collision, and by the American pilots on the delivery flight of the Embraer Legacy, whom failed to turn on their anti-collision system or TCAS, being unfamiliar with their brand-new aircraft. 

The “Flying Tigers" was a volunteer unit of American ex-military and civilian pilots who flew to help the Chinese Air Force from the 21st of December in 1941– to late 1942. At a time when America was only getting bad news from the battle in the Pacific these airmen were flying, fighting and beating the formerly all-conquering Japanese air forces These men were an interesting and rather irregular group of individuals that made one of the best fighting units of the war. They flew their colourful shark nosed P-40’s that became synonymous with that aircraft (and many other imitators) as well as being feared by the Japanese.

Hey guys repeat after me!
-Rhodey is his own character separate from Tony Stark
-He is a genius who went to MIT
-He is a colonel with the United States Military
-He goes on American military operations piloting the War Machine armour
- He is a goddamn hero outside of Tony Stark and deserves his own goddamn movie

Spin Me Right ‘Round

The Canary was making a quick stop on Outpost CB-10-31, also known as Atlantica, for supplies and some R&R. It was a low-gravity world with a very thin atmosphere. The Outpost itself was built inside a massive dome, inside a crater. This was the first resupply in two years, so the captain had agreed to allow the whole crew shore leave over the course of the two weeks they would be docked there.

Keep reading

Ahmet Ali Çelikten’s grandmother came to the Ottoman Empire as a Nigerian slave. During World War I, her grandson joined the Ottoman Aviation Squadrons. He received his “wings” in 1914, making him probably the first black military pilot in history. After World War I, he went on to fly for Turkey during its war of independence.

8

“Airplane” (1980)  and “Zero Hour” (1957)

“Airplane” is a comedy spoof of the disaster film genre. It uses characters and the plot line from the 1957 drama “Zero Hour”. The movies are so close that remake rights had to be purchased from Warner Brothers.

Ted Striker (Dana Andrews in “Zero Hour”/Robert Hayes in “Airplane”) a former military pilot has to take over the controls of a commercial flight when the crew suffers food poisoning from the inflight meal.

2

>Modern Rogue One AU

Jyn Erso is a notorious thief who can break in to just about anywhere. When she is captured by special agent Cassian Andor and his partner - who goes only by code name K2 - she is wary of their intentions, until she learns they plan on infiltrating a high security building to collect top secret files from an enemy government. Originally, she is only supposed to make contact with her father, a POW now working on weapons for the enemy. But after his death she grows more and more determined to take them down.

Joining Jyn, Cassian, and K2 is former military pilot Bodhi Rook, and retired special agents Chirrut Îmwe and Baze Malbus - now working as security guards for their governments own weapons.