military wife

Well-intentioned questions:

“When will he get leave next?”

“Where will he be stationed next?”

“Will he be able to come back for my wedding/Christmas/birthdays/holidays/anniversary?”

“When will you get to see each other again?”

You don’t know but I’m the girl that drags herself out of bed every morning so that he will be proud of her when he comes home. I’m the girl who lies in bed longing for him to be lying next to me. I’m the girl who sits quietly in class because all I can think about is the next moment that he’ll be in my arms again. You don’t know, but I’m the girl with a million things to say, but none will come out without the thought of him. I’m the girl who checks my phone every five seconds just to make sure I haven’t missed his call. You tell me you know how I feel and that you understand what I’m going through; you have no idea. What you don’t realize is that I understand the true meaning of not only love, but of longing and anticipation. I am one of the girls who will make friends with complete strangers for only they can even begin to understand what I am going through. You don’t understand that I picture his face everywhere I go and that he is with me in everything I do. You tell me that you support the troops; I tell you, I’m in love with one.
—  Probably every military girlfriend/wife. 
Married to the military

“Why did you get married so young?” I hear it ALL THE TIME.

Being married to the military is a completely different world in general. My husband and I, married at 21, have discussed why in the military culture we all get married “so young”. At 21, these men (and women!) already have more responsibility than some of our friends will have in their entire lives. It forces them to grow up— and in growing up they settle down and realize what is important to them. Same goes for the dedicated military spouse. Committing to a relationship that most of the time is long distance, and ALL of the time is a huge stress, is a very mature thing to do. The 20 year old military couple can not be compared to others— we are a breed of our own. Families and friends will not always understand that. That is why we become such good friends with each other as military spouses. We are family ❤️

Merrily,
R

Please fire me. I work at a drugstore. I keep a coupon folder under my register and offer to use coupons whenever customers make purchases that I know I have coupons for. I live in a military town and figured this was a small way I could give back to service members who don’t make much. I’ve saved some customers as much as 50-75% on their purchases. Over the three years I’ve been doing this, I’ve received 26 calls to corporate by customers thanking me for doing this. I have not received any incentive or reward for doing this, but I do it because I want to.

Last week a regular customer, who I regularly apply coupons to her weekly purchases, came in and made a $12 purchase. I had no coupons for her items. She called corporate and complained because I did not offer her any coupons. I was counseled for an hour by my manager and also received a 20 minute lecture from my district manager, and am now under consideration for disciplinary review. I may lose my job for not having had any coupons to save this woman money on a $12 purchase. 

I was also told to stop offering coupons to other customers because of this.