military medic

earthzero  asked:

I have this massively complicated AU mostly in my head that I've been trying to write out. I call it Earth Zero (hence my Tumblr name). One of the key departure points from canon is that Bucky has a huge family that never forgets about him. Also, Bucky was married and had kids before the war, so he has direct descendants who not only want to get their dad/grandpa back, once they learn he's still alive, but actually have the means and skills to do it (military and medical training).

OOO IM INTO IT!!! Tell me more (if you’d like)!

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Trump awards veteran Purple Heart, says “congratulations” and “tremendous job”

  • Trump paid a visit on Saturday to Sgt. First Class Alvaro Barrientos, who lost a leg while serving in Afghanistan.
  • During a brief ceremony at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Trump awarded Barrientos a Purple Heart and, oddly, offered his congratulations.
  • “So I heard about this, I wanted to do this myself,” Trump told Barrientos, according to CNN. “Congratulations on behalf of Melania and myself and the entire nation. Tremendous, tremendous job, congratulations.”
  • The Purple Heart is awarded to those who are killed or wounded in battle, which — as many people pointed out on social media — are less-than-“tremendous” circumstances. Read more (4/23/17 5:41 AM)

anonymous asked:

Why aren't combat medics given weapons?

Well, to be fair, medics can sometimes have weapons for self defense. They need to be able to defend themselves if they’re targeted. But they aren’t supposed to be seen as combatants, is the thing. You can read about it all here, but the short answer is that the Geneva Conventions tries to protect medics. Combat medics are hard to come by: their training takes ages and not everyone has the capacity to be a medic. It’s not just a matter of intelligence, but it requires you to endure traumatizing environments where multiple people may have organs and limbs severely damaged, not to mention the iron will to plunge into an ongoing firefight to treat a casualty at the risk of your own life.

Now, anyone who’s ever played WoW, DOTA, LoL, Overwatch, or literally any other team game knows that in a battle, you take out the healer/support first. That’s just good tactics. But if everyone did that, war would be even more deadly and destructive than it already is, and war would become less about who had the best tactics and more about who’s the best at killing the medics.

So for the benefit of all combatants, we decided medics should be considered neutral parties. As long as they’re just tending to the wounded and aren’t actively harming the enemy, medics on either side aren’t supposed to be harmed, though sometimes they are because stray bullets and inaccurate artillery are a thing. And because some enemies we’re fighting (like in the Middle East currently) don’t adhere to the GC and do what they want. 

But the moment a medic picks up a weapon and starts firing, they’re fair game, and most units would say that their medics are too valuable to risk just to have one more person on a weapon unless it was absolutely necessary. 

-Spc. Kingsley

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Books you should read because I LOVE THEM

Dedication: For @kissmybruisedknuckles who told me to make this because she’s too lazy to make one lol

1. Strange The Dreamer - Laini Taylor

The dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he’s been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance or lose his dream forever.

What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving?

2. The Night Circus - Erin Morgenstern

The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it, no paper notices plastered on lampposts and billboards. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within these nocturnal black-and-white striped tents awaits an utterly unique, a feast for the senses, where one can get lost in a maze of clouds, meander through a lush garden made of ice, stare in wonderment as the tattooed contortionist folds herself into a small glass box, and become deliciously tipsy from the scents of caramel and cinnamon that waft through the air.

Welcome to Le Cirque des Rêves.

3. Unwind - Neil Shusterman

The Second Civil War was fought over reproductive rights. The chilling resolution: Life is inviolable from the moment of conception until age thirteen. Between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, however, parents can have their child “unwound,” whereby all of the child’s organs are transplanted into different donors, so life doesn’t technically end. Connor is too difficult for his parents to control. Risa, a ward of the state, is not enough to be kept alive. And Lev is a tithe, a child conceived and raised to be unwound. Together, they may have a chance to escape and to survive.

4. Cinder - Marissa Meyer

Sixteen-year-old Cinder is considered a technological mistake by most of society and a burden by her stepmother. Being cyborg does have its benefits, though: Cinder’s brain interference has given her an uncanny ability to fix things (robots, hovers, her own malfunctioning parts), making her the best mechanic in New Beijing. This reputation brings Prince Kai himself to her weekly market booth, needing her to repair a broken android before the annual ball. He jokingly calls it “a matter of national security,” but Cinder suspects it’s more serious than he’s letting on.

5. This Savage Song - Victoria Schwab

Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives.

6. The Darkest Part of The Forest - Holly Black

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

7. Red Queen - Victoria Aveyard

This is a world divided by blood – red or silver.

The Reds are commoners, ruled by a Silver elite in possession of god-like superpowers. And to Mare Barrow, a seventeen-year-old Red girl from the poverty-stricken Stilts, it seems like nothing will ever change. That is, until she finds herself working in the Silver Palace. Here, surrounded by the people she hates the most, Mare discovers that, despite her red blood, she possesses a deadly power of her own. One that threatens to destroy the balance of power.

8. Daughter of Smoke and Bone - Laini Taylor

In a dark and dusty shop, a devil’s supply of human teeth grows dangerously low. And in the tangled lanes of Prague, a young art student is about to be caught up in a brutal otherworldly war.

Meet Karou. She fills her sketchbooks with monsters that may or may not be real, she’s prone to disappearing on mysterious “errands”, she speaks many languages - not all of them human - and her bright blue hair actually grows out of her head that color. Who is she? That is the question that haunts her, and she’s about to find out.

9. Illuminae - Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than an ice-covered speck at the edge of the universe. Too bad nobody thought to warn the people living on it. With enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to fight their way onto an evacuating fleet, with an enemy warship in hot pursuit.

BRIEFING NOTE: Told through a fascinating dossier of hacked documents—including emails, schematics, military files, IMs, medical reports, interviews, and more

10. Legend - Marie Lu

What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths—until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

11. Angelfall (Penryn and the end of days) - Susan Ee

It’s been six weeks since angels of the apocalypse descended to demolish the modern world. Street gangs rule the day while fear and superstition rule the night. When warrior angels fly away with a helpless little girl, her seventeen-year-old sister Penryn will do anything to get her back.

Anything, including making a deal with an enemy angel.

12. Caraval - Stephanie Garber

Remember, it’s only a game…

Scarlett Dragna has never left the tiny island where she and her sister, Tella, live with their powerful, and cruel, father. Now Scarlett’s father has arranged a marriage for her, and Scarlett thinks her dreams of seeing Caraval—the faraway, once-a-year performance where the audience participates in the show—are over.

But this year, Scarlett’s long-dreamt-of invitation finally arrives. With the help of a mysterious sailor, Tella whisks Scarlett away to the show. Only, as soon as they arrive, Tella is kidnapped by Caraval’s mastermind organizer, Legend. It turns out that this season’s Caraval revolves around Tella, and whoever finds her first is the winner.

13. The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer - Michelle Hodkin

Mara Dyer believes life can’t get any stranger than waking up in a hospital with no memory of how she got there.

It can.

She believes there must be more to the accident she can’t remember that killed her friends and left her strangely unharmed.

There is.

14. An Ember In The Ashes - Sabaa Tahir

Laia is a slave. Elias is a soldier. Neither is free.

Under the Martial Empire, defiance is met with death. Those who do not vow their blood and bodies to the Emperor risk the execution of their loved ones and the destruction of all they hold dear. It is in this brutal world, inspired by ancient Rome, that Laia lives with her grandparents and older brother. The family ekes out an existence in the Empire’s impoverished backstreets. They do not challenge the Empire. They’ve seen what happens to those who do.

15. The Darkest Minds - Alexandra Bracken

When Ruby woke up on her tenth birthday, something about her had changed. Something frightening enough to make her parents lock her in the garage and call the police. Something that got her sent to Thurmond, a brutal government “rehabilitation camp.” She might have survived the mysterious disease that had killed most of America’s children, but she and the others emerged with something far worse: frightening abilities they could not control.


16. The Wrath and The Dawn - Renee Ahdieh

One Life to One Dawn.

In a land ruled by a murderous boy-king, each dawn brings heartache to a new family. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, is a monster. Each night he takes a new bride only to have a silk cord wrapped around her throat come morning. When sixteen-year-old Shahrzad’s dearest friend falls victim to Khalid, Shahrzad vows vengeance and volunteers to be his next bride. Shahrzad is determined not only to stay alive, but to end the caliph’s reign of terror once and for all.

anonymous asked:

Hi there! I'm hoping to write a story about a woman combat medic, and have multiple questions. I know this is a combat position, and women were only recently accepted to those, so where would she most likely be stationed? Would she spend more time in battles or in hospitals? Are combat medics (68Ws?) more likely to develop PTSD? What are more common positions for women? How easy is it for combat medics, once they leave the military, to become EMTs? Are there any common misconceptions? Thanks!

I always want to provide the best answers here that I can, so I’m thrilled to announce the first guest post of @ginger-wuv​, a fantastic female medic who’s graciously agreed to tackle this ask. This is some grade A stuff, so I hope you all enjoy and give Doc Rain some kudos if you like it! -Kingsley

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“U.S. nurses walk along a beach in Normandy, France on July 4, 1944, after they had waded through the surf from their landing craft. They are on their way to field hospitals to care for the wounded allied soldiers.”

(AP)

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The Bloody Red Baron’s traumatic brain injury,

 The issue of head trauma and brain injury has been in the spotlight a lot lately, especially when it comes to sports and athletic injury, as well as auto accidents, job accidents, and of course, soldiers returning home from war.  Perhaps one recently recognized case of traumatic brain injury in history is Manfred von Richthofen, also known as the “Red Baron”.  One of the greatest combat fighter pilots of all time, the German ace helped form the foundation of aerial dogfighting.  He wasn’t the most skilled pilot, but he utilized tactics which made him the most dangerous airman of World War I, earning him 80 kills, making him the highest scoring and most decorated pilot of the war. Richthofen’s incredible success was mostly due to his strict adherence to a set rules governing dogfighting called the “Boelcke Dictums”, written by German flying ace Oswald Boelcke.  Today the Boelcke Dictums are holy gospel among fighter pilots, still taught to trainees in air forces around the world.

On July 6th, 1917, Richthofen suffered a gunshot wound to the head, damaging the frontal lobe of his brain.  Amazingly, the wound didn’t kill him, and he was able to land in friendly territory. He had to undergo several operations to remove bone fragments from his damaged brain, and was temporarily blinded and paralyzed. Amazingly, Richthofen made a quick comeback, spending only three months convalescing and healing, attempting to return to active duty in August but finally returning to the air on October 23rd.

Richthofen wasn’t the same after his head injury, and modern medical professionals  have looked over his case and determined that he could have suffered from a serious traumatic brain injury. He become disinhibited and compulsive, often making snap judgments and irrational decisions.  He also had less control over his emotions, becoming moody and depressed.  In his journals, his writing became more simplistic, disorganized, and nonsensical.  In the air, he became more and more reckless, taking more dangerous risks and ignoring the Boelcke Dictums which he had rigidly adhered to before.  It is was quite clear that Richthofen was suffering from head trauma (and perhaps battle fatigue) resulting in decreased cognitive ability. It is a good possibility that the Bloody Red Baron had lost his edge due to his injury.

On April 21st, 1918 Richthofen broke formation with his squadron to chase an Allied plane.  Flying mere hundreds of feet above the ground, Richthofen pursued the fighter deep into enemy territory, totally oblivious of enemy fighters diving on his six and a mass of anti aircraft fire rising from the ground.  Neurologists call this “target fixation”, a habit common among those suffering brain injuries where a person will fixate on a particular object or thing while losing awareness of his or her surroundings.   Richthofen sustained a mortal gunshot wound to the chest, going down and crashing.  He was buried with honors by British forces.  Today, most medical and military experts agree that the Red Baron would have never been allowed to fly again in any modern air force.

Meanwhile, Molly

(Or: More Things That People Think Make Sherlock Canonically Straight But They Really Really Don’t)

Allow me to address one more incredibly beautiful part of Sherlock (and then I’ll stop overusing the word “beautiful”, sorry, I just loved series four): Let’s talk about what is the point of Molly Hooper.

I’ve always sympathised with Molly, but I admit that from a literary point of view, I didn’t quite get her. If she was a love interest for Sherlock, why would the story not revolve more around her? But if she wasn’t a love interest, where was her character going? Why was she there in the first place? It didn’t feel Moffat-y sound. (And yes, I just made that expression up.) 

But looking back on all four series, the intention of Molly’s character actually becomes pretty clear. In a nutshell: At any given moment of the show, Molly is an indicator of John Watson’s feelings towards Sherlock. (No really, let me show you.) 

Originally posted by acrossthestarx

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youtube

Combat Fatigue Irritability [1945]:

This vintage film touches the issue of combat disorders, irritable mood, psychiatry, and psychotherapy. This film presents the case of a Navy seaman suffering from combat fatigue. He is first shown at his duty station in the engine room of a ship, manipulating water pipe valves. The scene then shifts to a hospital ward; the sailor’s ship has been torpedoed and sunk. The patient has not suffered any physical wounds, but he is jumpy, nervous, combative, and short-tempered. He goes home on a 30-day leave, thinking all will be well once he is away from the hospital and the military. But he blows up at his family, walks the streets, gets drunk, and fights with his girlfriend. The only people he feels comfortable with are other servicemen home on leave. He becomes so distraught when hunting in the woods with his father that he is taken to a doctor and then sent back to the Navy hospital. He is aware now that he is ill and cannot cope with civilian or military life. Talking about his deep feelings and fears in individual and group therapy sessions helps the sailor recognize and deal with his problems. This film acquaints the patient suffering from combat exhaustion with the nature of his illness and the therapy necessary for recovery. Stars Gene Kelly.

anonymous asked:

What is the process of somebody being discharged from the US army due to becoming paraplegic due to the line of duty (in this specific case, he protected a civilian and some fellow soldiers during a dispatch in Iraq - I'm not sure if that has any effect on anything but figured I'd note it down just in case). Thanks in advance!

The specifics of being wounded in action aren’t really important unless the soldier was also a POW. For future reference remember that that’s the word we use – wounded! Not “injured.” 

The soldier would be medically discharged. Barring extenuating circumstances, it would be an honorable discharge with all associated perks. The discharge process wouldn’t start until the soldier was capable of participating in the process, as they have to sign numerous papers and attend multiple classes, but since medical appointments take precedence and you aren’t allowed to miss classes, it can wind up taking quite a long time. 
We call the discharge process for a medical discharge “getting medboarded” or MEB, because you go before a medboard who determines your ability to perform your job based on your disabilities. Paraplegia obviously would be a pretty immediate medboard. You can see more info on the MEB/PEB here, but tl;dr like two or three physicians will evaluate your status and recommend whether or not a discharge is necessary.
The process can take two months to six months and during the process, the soldier is still considered active duty and receives active duty pay. If the soldier disagrees with the MEB’s decision they can appeal it, but it’s uncommon to overturn such decisions.

The soldier would have to apply for disability after being medboarded, and they’d have to still undergo physicals and submit paperwork proving their disability and basically undergo an entirely new medboard and see how disabled the army says they are. Paraplegia might actually not warrant a full 100% disability rating, although depending on the severity of the soldier’s overall health and ability to care for themselves will be taken into account, and I think they would receive a “special monthly compensation” as a bonus to the disability payment for having lost use of major limbs. You can see disability compensation rates here, keeping in mind that it would take anywhere between five to ten months after discharge to start receiving disability, although the army will backpay you the months it took them to make it official.

In most cases a soldier is still expected to show up to work during a medboard, but of course given extenuating circumstances that can change. The soldier would still be accountable to their unit and have to keep in touch with their leadership. 

I’d like to clarify that limb loss or similar injuries aren’t necessarily an immediate medboard. There are active duty soldiers with prosthetics who serve fulfilling careers. I’ve never personally heard of a paraplegic remaining on active duty, but I can’t say I’d be surprised if it ever happened.

I hope that’s enough information for you!

-Kingsley

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Oh, Lord I ask for your divine
strength to meet the demands of
my profession. Help me to be the
finest medic, both technically and
tactically.

If I am called to the battlefield, give me the courage to conserve our fighting forces by
providing medical care to all who
are in need.

If I am called to a mission of peace, give me the strength to lead by caring for
those who need my assistance.
Finally, Lord help me to take care
of my own spiritual, physical, and
emotional needs.

Teach me to trust in your
presence and never-failing love.
Amen.