military and war

This is a good breakdown explanation of the military fetishism most of the US is affected with. Patriotism comes in many forms! Players are kneeling to bring attention to racial injustice and systematic racism. They are kneeling to remind us that there is police killing americans without justification and any consequences.

Take That, Anti-Semites

In 1916, in the middle of World War I, the German military conducted the Judenzählung: a census of German Jews. It was intended to confirm accusations of lack of patriotism among German Jews. But the census not only disproved the anti-Semitic rumors, it crushed them. Not only were German Jews enlisting in the army, a higher percentage of German Jews fought than of any other ethnic, religious or political group in Germany.

The results of the census were not made public at the time.

The Forgotten American Hero Of The Great War

Meet Alvin C. York, one of the most decorated American soldiers during the First World War. He received the Medal of Honor for one spectacular attack during the Battle of the Argonne. He was put in a group of 17 Americans soldiers who were ordered to infiltrate the German lines and take out one machine gun position. They were able to capture a number of German soldiers, but then small arms fire killed six and wounded three. Suddenly, York was the highest ranking remaining soldier.

He took command, and immediately ordered his men to guard the prisoners while he – by himself– went to attack that one machine gun position they had been ordered to take out. He attacked the German machine gun nest – again, by himself! – with just his rifle and his pistol. That’s right: he took a rifle to a machine gun fight. York ended up taking 35 machine guns, killing at least 25 enemy soldiers, and capturing 132 enemy soldiers.

York was lionized for decades, although he has largely been forgotten by newer generations. A 1941 film about him, Sergeant York, was that year’s highest-grossing film. And the man who played York, Gary Cooper, won the Academy Award for Best Actor that year.

The Heavyweight Punch by Geoff Hunt.

In the misty calm of the morning of 21st October 1805, three of Great Britain’s most powerful ships - Victory (100 guns), Temeraire (98) and Neptune (98) are seen under full sail, bearing down majestically on the enemy line off Cape Trafalgar. The colossal might of Victory, Temeraire and Neptune, combined firepower of 296 guns, is seen from the French and Spanish line as they close to deliver the famous “Heavyweight Punch”