mileage will vary

anonymous asked:

Hello, if you have the time, could you explain how hair lines work?? specifically on men because I am struggling :-(

Well, I can give you some tips based on how I do it. Your mileage may vary.

I mainly figure out where my dudes’ hairlines are supposed to be based on the physical landmarks of the head. Here’s a generic head I drew up that highlights those parts. It’s not realistically accurate since these are TF2-ish proportions, but it does involve knowledge of actual anatomy, which isn’t as scary as it sounds.

1-3 are self-explanatory. 4 is that slight bony ridge around that little depressed area behind your forehead on the sides. 5 is the bump of the base of your skull where it meets your neck muscle.

Also, notice where things line up, since these are clues to help you lock things in place and keep facial features from floating around too much. For example, the top of the ear generally lines up with the eyeline and the bottom with the mouth. There are lots of little tricks like that.

And here’s a generic hairline based on these landmarks.

Of course, reference is also going to help you out a bunch here. The above approximation is just meant to give a basic idea of where a hairline would be. Like fingerprints, everyone’s hairline is unique. Depending on your character, you should feel free to mix it up!

These are just a few slight variations, to give you an idea of what I mean: rounded, pointy, and receding. Once I have my hairline roughed in, I pick where the hair part is (if there is one) and sketch in the hair, following the natural growth pattern of hair.

You can get nearly infinite variations! Get wacky with it! And there’s no one 100% correct way to draw a hairline (or anything else, for that matter) so don’t get too hung up on not doing it wrong. Practice until you’re comfortable, and you’ll be winging it in no time.

anonymous asked:

Help! Do you ever have days where you don't want to write or revise but you know you should? What do you do to get through them?

Oh my.

Okay, so this is a thing that happens. Maybe not to everyone, but it happens to me, and when it does it is almost always for one of two reasons. Each of these reasons has a slightly different solution (there is also a third reason, which we may get into in a minute, but it’s more of a crisis than a reason, so mileage may vary).

Reason number one is, I’m easily distracted and full of thoughts and kind of lazy. So if I’m being that, there is only one solution and it is “Brenna, sit down in front of that screen and make a book, it is your JOB.” It usually works—boredom maxes out after about five minutes of staring at my document file and I start working. And there are some secondary tricks too: I work in coffee shops a lot because I like the background noise. I have big headphones that feel good squeezing my head and fill me with a sense of wellbeing. I find a song and listen to it on repeat. I always drink or eat the same thing. I wear a sweater that I like. (I fall into habits very easily and have learned to use this quality to trick myself into working.)

Reason number two, though. Reason two is that sometimes my brain is empty. I’ve been working too much too fast and not refilling my thoughts and now all the fuel is gone and I’m just grinding metal. Sometimes that means I need to not work and do something mindless, like wash dishes or vacuum or repot houseplants or drive or go outside and dig a hole and then fill it back up. Or sometimes it means I need to not work and go read a book or watch a movie or go to a museum and see things other people made when they were expansive and excited and not out of thoughts. And then, once my brain has had enough food and enough rest, I’m ready again.

Both of these reasons for not writing are totally normal (for me) (for you?) but it’s important to be able to tell the difference, because one is solved by powering through, and one is not. Which brings us to the third crisis reason.

Sometimes, I am on a brutal deadline. Sometimes it’s non-negotiable. Sometimes I have pulled two all-nighters in a row and am staring down the barrel of a third, and I know I’d want to work if I could just have a second where I’m NOT working, but that is only a beautiful dream. This is a problem. You know those people who only ever seem to operate at 100% when under extreme duress?  *raises hand* A weird thing happens where I don’t WANT to work anymore, but the overdrive switch has flipped in my brain, and it will do the work until the job is done, whether I want to or not. And trust me, I DON’T. It is like being dragged through a drippy alligatory swamp by a robot—you’re just like “please, robot, stop moving my legs! This was the actual hardest thing for me to figure out a solution for, because:

1) Deadlines are a part of my job, and sometimes they are quite tight, and the work still has to get done anyway.

2) As much as I absolutely hate it, there is another part of me that likes it.

But I know more now than I used to. Back when I was 23 and completely unwise and taking a course overload in grad school while interning and also working 30 hours a week, I was just like “this is how we live a life!” That is not true. Can you hear me in the back? THAT IS NOT TRUE.

But sometimes you still have to do stuff and there’s a lot of it and you also have very little time to do it in. So let me tell you a deadline secret, it is very important: the answer to Brenna’s acute deadline crisis is, drink water, eat almonds, divide each 24-hour cycle into two discrete sections, allowing for one 3-hour sleep cycle and one 4 to 5-hour one. This is because if you are me, you start to feel like you are not allowed to sleep. This is a lie. And in fact, if you don’t sleep, I promise your work won’t be as good. At very best, it will be pretty weird. Also, drink less coffee. You think you need it, but you don’t.

I realize the answer to this question escalated quickly. Probably just focus on points 1 and 2—telling the difference between when your brain is empty and when it’s just dragging its feet. Unless you are a person who is currently living my 23-year-old life. In which case, you are not just allowed to sleep. Dude, you HAVE TO.

I created this image, but the diagram resembles ones I’ve seen in the works of Gede Parma and Christopher Penczak (credit where credit is due!) and neatly describes one approach to the loose architecture of reality as experienced by a journeying witch or hedgerider. While your mileage may vary, and you might see reality as completely different in structure, I have found this map, a vesica pisces, to be useful in categorizing other worlds and also parts of myself.

CW: Badly made pie charts VENN DIAGRAMS yes I know I said the wrong thing.

I felt like making a simple guide to symptom commonalities between these three, because there are a lot and it seems like something that confuses a lot of people. As always, your mileage may vary; just because you have one diagnosis doesn’t mean you can’t have traits that aren’t associated with it, you don’t have to (and probably will not) have every trait of your disorder(s), and dyspraxia, ADHD, and autism can all present in a number of different ways.

I managed to make this in like five minutes because Concerta is Magic.

- Sana

I feel like it’s worth noting, wrt to the Outlander photo today, that in the accompanying article Caitriona Balfe did say “(…) it’s a new beginning, but it’s so fraught with so many other things. Obviously, this is Jamie’s child, but Claire’s in a new time and believes that Jamie is dead. So she’s really trying to look forward and give her daughter a new life, a stable family. I think it’s difficult for both of them. Frank is coming to terms with his wife. He didn’t quite know what had happened. She disappeared and she’s back. They’re tentatively trying to see if they can patch things up and allow themselves to embrace a future together. They really do try, but it’s not quite that easy.

Which is exactly what happens in the book: they try to be a family and go back to what they were, especially for Bree’s sake, but they just can’t. I think even Claire’s face in the photo hints at that (yes she’s looking at Frank, but the lower half of her face looks like she’s about to cry, I think.) So far we don’t see that they’re glossing over anything; in fact, they seem to have gotten into the angst of the situation. So there’s no reason to assume Claire and Frank will be fine and normal and lovely-dovey. 

I’m not the kind of person who’s really very good at forming her own opinions on things. It takes me a while to kind of ponder and crystallize how I feel about most topics, and pretty much everything winds up having elements where it looks different from different angles, so I never have like, A Solid Feeling I Always Feel About This Thing.

(I used to worry about it a lot, when I was a kid. There are still some songs/bands/albums I listen to and remember my deep anxiety: how could I tell if this was Good? Other people seemed to always know– that music’s shit and we’ll laugh at you, this music’s Great but only right now, that music there is Classic and no matter what will always be Good. How do you know which is which.)

Anyway. So, I don’t really have An Opinion Of My Own about Rogue One.

What I do have, after reading many reviews, is an interesting observation to make:

Every person of color I’ve read a review from loved it. I don’t know that my sample is representative, but for so many people, it fulfilled such a deep-seated need inside them that, several reviewers independently said, they hadn’t realized they still had, to see someone who looked like them in this context. And that’s incredibly touching, to me. I know I cried to see a lady pilot among the 70s-moustached dudes! My only tears of the movie. So I get that, I do, and I’m so excited for it.

The critical reviews I’ve read have mostly not been from people of color. And they’ve made excellent points– how terrible is it, for one, that the only way the powers that be could see their way to putting so many men of color into a Star Wars film was to kill them all in the end? The hope, and eventual success, of the Rebellion is literally built on the ashes and bones of women and people of color, who were expressly not included in the glorious success at the end of the original trilogy.

(And also: where are the women of color. Where are the women, period. What the fuck, racists and misogynists were already going to protest your movie; you could have done whatever you wanted at this point, so why was this all you wanted??)

I feel like the critical points are good to make. And I feel like that’s maybe who should be making them. Sure, there are valid points to be argued about structural or thematic weaknesses, sure there are still complaints to be made. But. 

If you got to have representation for the first time in this movie, you should feel free to enjoy it uncritically. 

What the signs really want
  • Aries: to live long enough to see something amazing
  • Taurus: self-confidence, respect, and loads of friends
  • Gemini: some goddamn peace and quiet
  • Cancer: for the people they care about to be okay
  • Leo: to reconnect with old friends and make some new ones
  • Virgo: a chance for new beginnings
  • Libra: to feel whole
  • Scorpio: to have done something worthwhile and meaningful
  • Sagittarius: redemption and honor
  • Capricorn: to be free from restrictions and tight spaces
  • Aquarius: forgiveness
  • Pisces: for everyone to be happy
Personal Youtube Faves

These are all gaming youtube people (some of which are also LGBT+ too) who I’ve always found safe to watch as well as having important, relevant, and entertaining content. Your mileage may vary though (especially if you don’t like shouting, swearing, or generally sexually explicit content).

I have OCD. 

It doesn’t rule my life, but it used to. Knowing that I have the capacity for that kind of thought is exactly why it doesn’t rule my life like it used to. I’m perfectly aware that I’m going to have that capacity forever, as studies have shown that Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is genetic (if you have a parent with OCD, as I do, you have a fifty-fifty chance) and is caused by abnormal brain circuitry, which means you’re stuck with it. And I am okay with that. I’ll survive. Recently, readers have asked me a lot how I learned to control it, so this is my story.*

*with the obvious warning that I am not a therapist and you are not me and I am not you and this is just my story your mileage may vary.

I was an anxious child. OCD and anxiety play very well together, and back then, I didn’t really know what was happening. I was a twitchy creature of secret rituals.

The first thing that helped me was when I realized that my obsessions weren’t normal. Not everyone felt this way. And not all thoughts had to feel this way, either. 

The second thing that helped me was realizing that OCD didn’t really look the way it looked on television. Obsession could be about germs or cracks in the sidewalk, but really, it turns out that I can obsess about all kinds of things.

The third thing that helped me was figuring out that my compulsions weren’t always straightforward. Sometimes they were directly related to the obsession:

Tags in shirts —–> change clothing eleven times a day

tweets —–> refresh the screen every twelve seconds

Others, not so much:

Dying before making a mark —-> replacing all other activities like eating and sleeping with research, acquisition, and practicing of a new musical instrument

Datsuns —-> i don’t even know how i ended up with a datsun but i resent that entire chapter of my life

When my OCD was in control of me, it changed the way I looked at the world. Example. Here is life:

Life is always full of both bad and good things. Also trees. There will always be disasters and miracles happening in tandem. Mental illness changes the way you see it, though. For instance, a depressed person:


A content person:

The good or bad things don’t go away. You just point your gaze in a different direction. You are able to minimize some things and expand on others. When I got obsessive thoughts, they shifted my gaze onto something and held it there. It didn’t have to be something huge. It could have been about if my hair was dirty, or if I had said a prayer correctly, or if I had the precise same amount of air in each of my car’s tires.


In my head, the thought, whatever it was, became all encompassing. 

It didn’t matter what else I tried to do, my mind would return to it. It became everything, my whole world, looped again and again and again.

I don’t even know if those are what lady bugs look like. I guess that’s okay. It’s a metaphor. They are only what I imagine ladybugs to look like, and my obsessive thoughts are not real thoughts, either. They aren’t really me. They are something my brain does to process stress and uncertainty and decision-making.***

***this took me a long time to figure out. More in a bit.

My personal breakthrough came when I decided that I would give myself rules. I was a champion with rules. I was a champion with rituals. I was a champion with things that involved numbers and counting and generally being compulsive. So my rule was that if I caught myself thinking about something obsessively, the timer began.

I would tell myself I could obsess for a certain number of minutes, and then I had to do something else until a designated time when I was allowed to obsess over it again. I could obsess for ten minutes. Then I had to put it down completely for thirty minutes. Then I could have another ten minutes. Then I had to put it down for two hours. Then I could have another ten minutes. I wasn’t allowed to act on any of the thoughts, either. 

I told myself a rule was a rule. I couldn’t cheat on the time. And when I put it down, I had to really mean that I was putting it down. Did I want to be free or not? 

And it began to work. I began to be able to reward myself with less and less obsessing time.

And then the really amazing thing happened, the thing that changed my life. Once I had spent enough time disciplining my obsessive thoughts, I realized … they weren’t really my thoughts. They were markedly different in character from my ordinary thoughts. The further I got from them, the more I realized that they were mental illness, not me, and moreover, that I could be free of them if I wanted to be. All I had to do was identify a thought as obsessive when it first appeared:

And then give it the time it deserved:

And I got better and better at it. I still sometimes have to give myself three minutes, especially when under stress. I still have to sometimes remove myself from a physical location to give myself those three minutes. And sometimes I still end up with a Datsun. But mostly, I just live my life, and it’s invisible.

So much of it is knowing that it’s the place your brain goes to under stress. Knowing that you can be out from under it. Knowing that ladybugs don’t really look like that. I just googled them and it turns out they have an entire additional segment in front of that black bit where the head goes which means I just drew an entire flock of headless ladybugs. 

Well, all the better reason to avoid them.

buzzfeed.com
47 Hacks People With ADD/ADHD Use To Stay On Track
Everything from color-coding to bouncing on an exercise ball.
By Grace Spelman

As with all these things, your mileage may vary, but I thought this was better than the lists I’ve seen on ADDitude. (On a side note: Buzzfeed is apparently full of people with ADHD. I’m not surprised).

A few of these I actually do. (Like writing everything down and keeping my keys by the door). Others I’ve never thought of, and would like to try.

Which “hacks” do you do, or want to try?

The Poky Speed of Light

Radio frequencies like the frequencies of visible (and invisible) light are all an aspect of the same electromagnetic spectrum that in a vacuum travels at 299,792,458 meters or 186,282 miles per second. That’s appropriately 7 times around Earth’s equator in a single second.

As the bottom of the top chart states, Your mileage may vary. A good example of this is communicating with Mars. Depending where we are in our orbits relative to each other that 5.15 minutes can actually vary from 4 to as long as 24 minutes.

Keep looking up.

archiveofourown.org
Fic: Liminal Space
By Organization for Transformative Works

Title: Liminal Space
Rating: NC-17
Summary: Outside a bar in the middle of nowhere, Mr Gold finds an angry young woman named Lacey beating up her cheating boyfriend’s car. When he discovers that the boyfriend is Killian Jones, the man he knows is sleeping with his wife, he sees fit to join in. What follows is a long, strange night of diner coffee, personal revelations, and criminality, which leaves neither one of them the same person they were when they met.

A/N: This is heavily anti-Milah and anti-Hook. As in: both are presented as emotional abusers. There’s also infidelity, although considering the situation your mileage may vary on that. Finally, while it starts out looking like Golden Lace, I promise this is a Rumbelle fic.

Also: yes, I decided to drop this 17,000 word monster like a fucking Beyonce album. This is how I roll now.

Read it here

Why you should watch Storm Hawks:
  • Cartoon show with kids battling against bad guys with crystals
  • Also flying motorcycles
  • High-Mountain Sandbox Sky World with airships that make for great crossovers
  • Amazing 3D Animation with Anime-esque character designs
  • Reminisces of Saturday Morning Cartoons from the 80s/90s
  • Stork (While there is a great cast of characters that peeps may cling to, Stork is definitely the most popular one as I can see)
  • Enjoyable villians
  • Sides of darker tones that aren’t never really explore in show but intriguing to think about

I like to add that you mileage may vary and that the show was left on a cliffhanger on Season 2. Also, you may also want to check out fandom content since there are some incredible fanarts and fanfics in it.

This week’s vocabulary list

With thanks to the Cambridge Dictionary:

despot: a ruler who has unlimited power and often uses it unfairly and cruelly

tyrant: a ruler who has unlimited power over other people, and uses it unfairly and cruelly

megalomania: the belief that you are much more important and powerful than you really are

narcissism: too much interest in and admiration for your own physical appearance and/or your own abilities

arriviste: a person who is trying to move into a higher class in society

hatchet job: a cruel written or spoken attack on someone or something

the scum of the Earth: the worst type of people that can be imagined

trash: anything that is worthless and of low quality

Submitted without comment. Your mileage may vary. Be careful out there.

ROAD MAP FOR LGBT+ HOCKEY PLAYERS

I spent a large part of this year trying to find something like this: a guide to making a men’s hockey team more inclusive and safe for LGBT+ players. I found lots of information, including the first study on homophobia in hockey. But I didn’t find any solutions. This is a compilation of the best solutions I came up with.

DISCLAIMER: This relates specifically to a D2 collegiate men’s hockey team. Your mileage may vary on women’s hockey teams or teams at other levels.

Keep reading