mierles

Overtime: The Art of Work
March 8–May 17, 2015
1905 Building, South Galleries

As part of the special exhibition Overtime: The Art of Work, the Albright-Knox will host a lecture by legendary performance artist and public art pioneer Mierle Laderman Ukeles on Thursday, April 30

Over the past four decades, Mierle Laderman Ukeles has dedicated herself to raising awareness of social justice issues in people’s everyday lives. Based on her experience as a woman artist in the late 1960s and her increasing sense of injustice over the unacknowledged work that she and other women did to maintain the home, she wrote her “Manifesto for Maintenance Art,” which she followed with a series of actions. Whether by ceremonially scrubbing a piece of New York City pavement, or by drawing attention to the often-disregarded work of a museum’s guards, Ukeles’s Maintenance Art projects created indelible images of overlooked labor. Alongside these projects, Ukeles is perhaps best known for the project represented in Overtime.

Since 1977, Ukeles has been the first and only artist in residence in the history of the New York City Department of Sanitation. This unpaid residency provides her with an office/studio where she creates artworks that connect the often overlooked role of maintenance work with the public sphere. Touch Sanitation Performance was her first project during her residence. It involved visiting all of the fifty-nine sanitation districts and shaking hands individually with each of the 8,500 employees. During the eleven months this project took to complete, Ukeles repeatedly expressed gratitude, speaking for the public as a whole by saying to each worker, “Thank you for keeping New York City alive.”

Image: Mierle Laderman Ukeles (American, born 1939). Touch Sanitation Performance: Fresh Kills Landfill, 1977–80; printed 2007. Color photograph of “Handshake Ritual” with workers of New York City Department of Sanitation, 60 x 90 inches (152.4 x 228.6 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, NY.

Tonight, April 30, at 6 pm, legendary performance artist and public art pioneer Mierle Laderman Ukeles will discuss her work on view in “Overtime: The Art of Work,” which she made after becoming the first and only artist-in-residence of the New York City Department of Sanitation. [Mierle Laderman Ukeles (American, born 1939). Touch Sanitation Performance: Fresh Kills Landfill, 1977–80; printed 2007. Color photograph of “Handshake Ritual” with workers of New York City Department of Sanitation, 60 x 90 inches (152.4 x 228.6 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, NY.] #albrightknox #art #publicart #performanceart # mierleladermanukeles #ukeles by albrightknox http://ift.tt/1GzhPbi

Coupes aux fruits


250g de fraises mures

125g de framboises mures

125g de myrtilles mures

30cl de crème fraiche épaisse

2 cuillères à soupe de mierl

30cl de yaourt nature

2 cuillères à soupe de sucre glace


1. Lave tous les fruits et mets en une poignée de coté pour la décoration. Egoute les fraises et coupe les en 4.

2. Mets le sucre glace et la moitié des fruits dans le robot. Ferme le couvercle et mixe le tout en purée onctueuse.

3. Tamise la purée de fruits au dessus d’une jatte pour séparer les draines de la pulpe. A l’aide d’une cuillère en bois, écrase la purée pour recueillir le liquide.

4.Incorpore avec précaution le reste des fruits (sauf ceux que tu as mis de coté à l’étape 1) au contenu mixé.

5. Fouette légèrement la crème à part: elle doit etre un peu ferme. Incorpore le yaourt et le miel.

6. Ajoute pour terminer la moitié du mélanges au fruits. Répartit dans les verrines puis couvre du mélange au fruits.


Autre idée : utilise des fruits en boite tels que mangue, ananas, etc.