mid 14th century

The enormous plague epidemic of the mid-14th century…killed up to one-third of the respective populations of China, the Middle East, and Europe. However, these unwelcome by-products of unfolding globalization processes did not reach their most horrific manifestation until the fateful 16th-century collision of the ‘old’ and 'new’ worlds. Although the precise population size of the Americas before contact remains a contentious issue, it is estimated that the deadly germs of European invaders killed an estimated 18-20 million Native Americans—an inconceivable 90-95 per cent of the total indigenous population
— 

Manfred B. Steger, Globalization: A Very Short Introduction

Filed under “things they should really teach in high school history class but fucking don’t”

The photo shows Deva Gate of Jojakko-ji Temple in Kyoto during the autumn color season. The temple is very popular for its beautiful maple colors in autumn. Jojakko-ji Temple, located in Sagano, Kyoto, was founded by Priest Nisshin, the 16th head priest of Honkoku-ji Temple, during the Keicho era (1596-1615). With the support of Feudal Lord Kobayakawa Hideaki of Azuchi-Momoyama period, the Guest Hall of Momoyama Castle was moved to this temple as its Main Hall. The Niomon Gate (Deva Gate) was also moved here in 1616 from Honkoku-ji Temple, where it served as south entrance to the Guest Hall of the temple. Having been originally built in the mid-14th century, this gate with thatched roof is the oldest building among all buildings of Jojakko-ji Temple. http://dlvr.it/KStFRV

The photo shows lantern of Jojakko-ji Temple in Kyoto during the autumn color season. The temple is very popular for its beautiful maple colors in autumn. Jojakko-ji Temple, located in Sagano, Kyoto, was founded by Priest Nisshin, the 16th head priest of Honkoku-ji Temple, during the Keicho era (1596-1615). The Guest Hall of Momoyama Castle was moved to this temple as its Main Hall. The Niomon Gate (Deva Gate) was also moved here in 1616 from Honkoku-ji Temple, where it served as south entrance to the Guest Hall of the temple. Having been originally built in the mid-14th century, this gate with thatched roof is the oldest building among all buildings of Jojakko-ji Temple. http://dlvr.it/KSD504