michele alexander

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Through the Years → Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands (131/)

19 November 2005 | Dutch Crown Prince Willem Alexander holds Princess Amalia and Princess Maxima holds Princess Alexia who was baptized in Wassenaar, The Netherlands. The second daughter of HRH Prince Willem-Alexander, the heir apparent to the throne, and HRH Princess Maxima, Alexia is third in line to the Dutch throne, behind her father and elder sister, Princess Catharina-Amalia. She is named after her father (Alexia) and Juliana her great-grandmother Queen Juliana, Netherlands. (Photo by Michel Porro/Getty Images)

my crazy interpretations
  • Dear Evan Hansen: *crying*
  • Les Mis: *crying in French while all of the gays die*
  • Spring Awakening: sex
  • Amelie: French sex and mystery
  • Hamilton: rapping about founding daddies
  • Great Comet: aND ANDREY ISNT HERE
  • Next to Normal: just feels amazing???
  • Newsies: sTrIKE STRIKE STRIKE + some gay
  • Bonnie and Clyde: the exact musical about murderers on the run that you wanted
  • Heathers: it's not murder if you say sorry
The clock has been turned back on racial progress in America, though scarcely anyone seems to notice. All eyes are fixed on people like Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey, who have defied the odds and risen to power, fame, and fortune. For those left behind, especially those within prison walls, the celebration of racial triumph in America must seem a tad premature. More black men are imprisoned today than at any other moment in our nation’s history. More are disenfranchised today than in 1870, the year the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified prohibiting laws that explicitly deny the right to vote on the basis of race. Young black men today may be just as likely to suffer discrimination in employment, housing, public benefits, and jury service as a black man in the Jim Crow era–discrimination that is perfectly legal, because it is based on one’s criminal record.
—  Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow

Academics have developed complicated theories and obscure jargon in an effort to describe what is now referred to as structural racism, yet the concept is fairly straightforward. One theorist, Iris Marion Young, relying on a famous “birdcage” metaphor, explains it this way: If one thinks about racism by examining only one wire of the cage, or one form of disadvantage, it is difficult to understand how and why the bird is trapped. Only a large number of wires arranged in a specific way, and connected with one another, serve to enclose the bird and ensure it cannot escape.

What is particularly important to keep in mind is that any given wire of the cage may or may not be specifically developed for the purpose of trapping the bird, yet it still operates (together with other wires) to restrict its freedom.

—  Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow

A border story from Nogales, Arizona: I spotted 12-year-old Alexander Figueroa bringing his pug, Michelle, back home across the border from Nogales, Mexico. The dog’s lip had been torn in a fight with a bigger dog. The vet in Tucson quoted them $675 to stitch Michelle up. So instead, Alexander and his mom, Liliana, drove south. Total cost in Mexico: 600 pesos, or about $30. “And they gave her a free shower!” Alexander told me, happily.

–Melissa
Photo: Melissa Block/NPR