michael pollan

He showed the words ‘chocolate cake’ to a group of Americans and recorded their word associations. “Guilt” was the top response. If that strikes you as unexceptional, consider the response of French eaters to the same prompt: 'celebration.’
—  Michael Pollan, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto
Imagine your OTP

Person A: I’m getting married, and I want you to be in my wedding.
Person B: Oh, as a bridesmaid?
Person A: *gets on one knee* No, as my bride

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Samin Nosrat has become known as the chef who taught Michael Pollan to cook, after the famed food writer featured her in his book Cooked and his Netflix show of the same name.

Now, she’s sharing her wisdom with the masses in her new, illustrated cookbook called Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking. The key to good cooking, she says, is learning to balance those elements and trust your instincts, rather than just follow recipes.

Nosrat’s own formal culinary education came at Chez Panisse, the legendary restaurant in Berkeley, Calif., founded by Alice Waters. She first went there as a diner, then asked for a job and got one, working her way up. And it was while cooking at Chez Panisse that Nosrat had the revelation that eventually led to this cookbook — that salt, fat acid and heat are the fundamental elements to good food.

“The elements and the tenets of professional cooking don’t always get translated to the home cook,” she tells NPR’s Rachel Martin. “Recipes don’t encourage you to use your own senses and use your own judgement. And salt, fat, acid and heat can be your compass when you maybe don’t have other tools.”

Nosrat frees her readers to use their own senses instead of measuring cups.

She says we should salt things until they taste like the sea – which is a beautiful image, but also sounds like an awful lot of salt.

An Illustrated Guide To Master The Elements Of Cooking — Without Recipes

Illustrations: Courtesy of Wendy MacNaughton

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Samin Nosrat has become known as the chef who taught Michael Pollan to cook, after the famed food writer featured her in his book Cooked and his Netflix show of the same name.

Now, she’s sharing her wisdom with the masses in her new, illustrated cookbook called Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking. The key to good cooking, she says, is learning to balance those elements and trust your instincts, rather than just follow recipes.

An Illustrated Guide To Master The Elements Of Cooking — Without Recipes

Images courtesy of Wendy MacNaughton

Traditions survive because they are adaptive. They’re the result of a kind of cultural selection, like natural selection. They survive because they help keep people healthy and happy- and to throw that away, wholesale, is very often to loose things that are critical to our well-being. The meal is an incredible human institution- one of the most important things we can do is to reconnect to its sources.
— 

Cooked, Netflix original documentary narrated by author Michael Pollan

(I am now very, very hungry.)

One of the more pernicious aspects of nutritionism is that it encourages us to blame our health problems on lifestyle choices, implying that the individual bears ultimate responsibility for whatever illnesses befall him. It’s worth keeping in mind that a far more powerful predictor of heart disease than either diet or exercise is social class.
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Michael Pollan ~ In Defense of Food

(In response to the “that’s caused by diet, right?” myth)