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ENOSHIMA, Japan (June 27, 2016) - An MH-60R Sea Hawk, assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 51 and an SH-60K Seahawk, assigned to their sister squadron, Air Development Squadron (VX) 51 of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, perform a formation flight over Kanagawa prefecture. HSM-51 and VX-51, who share more than 30 years as sister squadrons, participated in the formation flight in order to foster greater interoperability between the two services. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew C. Duncker/Released)

MH-60 Seahawk over Kaneohe Bay, Marine Corps Base Hawaii

On my first day on Oahu a few weeks ago, I was really curious to check out the Marine Corps Base. I started walking towards it and I could see an MH-60 Seahawk Helicopter circling over Kaneohe Bay in the sunset. I needed to go closer to get a better view (photo), so I started walking along the freeway to find an opening in the bushes where I could see it best.

As I got closer to base (and a great angle), a Marine started walking towards me… so I casually flipped a u-turn in the other direction. Then the Marine Corps Police showed up from the other side, boxing me in. Whoops. They thought I was a lost crazy lady on the freeway. They took my information and reminded me it’s illegal to walk on freeways…

It was my first day in America after a few years and I honestly didn’t think twice about walking on the freeway. The shoulder was huge. And in other countries the roads have …different rules.

I’d even almost considered jumping the barrier in the middle for the best view but I was swayed because it was tall and I was wearing a dress.
Anyways that is how I made my first acquaintance with the Marine Corps and it’s pretty damn fitting…

This picture is totally worth it.

Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

One man climbs 24 flights of stairs several times a day alongside dormant elevators. Street vendors hawk plastic washboards for $20. And families outstretch their hands as crews in helicopters drop supplies in communities that remain isolated.

This is life one month after Hurricane Maria slammed into the U.S. territory on Sept. 20 as a Category 4 storm that killed at least 48 people, destroyed tens of thousands of homes and left tens of thousands of people without a job. It was the strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in nearly a century, with winds just shy of Category 5 force.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” retired schoolteacher Santa Rosario said as she scanned empty shelves at a supermarket in the capital of San Juan that had run out of water jugs — again.

Maria caused as much as an estimated $85 billion in damage across an island already mired in an 11-year recession. That has complicated and delayed efforts to restructure a portion of a $74 billion public debt load that officials say is unpayable. And it has thrust Puerto Rico’s territorial status into the international spotlight, reviving a sharp debate about its political future as the island attempts to recover from flooding, landslides and power and water outages.

Maria has also put Puerto Rico into the U.S. political spotlight with President Donald Trump on Thursday giving himself a “10” for his response to the devastation wrought by the hurricane. Asked when the 3.4 million U.S. citizens living there could expect power to be fully restored, Trump said it will take “a while.”

“There’s never been a case where power plants were gone,” Trump said, seated alongside Gov. Ricardo Rossello in the Oval Office. “So it’s going to be a period of time before the electric is restored.”

Roughly 80 percent of power customers remain in the dark, and another 30 percent are without water. Schools remain closed. Stoplights are not operating. And while nearly 90 percent of supermarkets have reopened, many have bare rows of shelves empty of goods ranging from water to bananas to canned tuna. (AP)

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Aibonito, Puerto Rico

Sonia Torres poses in her destroyed home, while taking a break from cleaning, three weeks after Hurricane Maria hit the island, on Oct. 11, 2017 in Aibonito, Puerto Rico. The area is without running water or grid power as a nightly curfew remains in effect. Despite multiple visits from FEMA, the town has yet to receive any FEMA aid. Only 10.6 percent of Puerto Rico’s grid electricity has been restored. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage including most of the electrical, gas and water grid as well as agriculture after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, swept through. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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A man prepares to fill a generator with gas to power a bar on a darkened street with car headlights in the distance three weeks after Hurricane Maria hit the island, on Oct. 11, 2017 in Aibonito, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Residents affected by Hurricane Maria wait in line for fuel donated by the Fuel Relief Fund in the municipality of Orocovis, outside San Juan, Puerto Rico, Oct. 10, 2017. (Photo: Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

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San Juan, Puerto Rico

Efrain Diaz Figueroa cleans his hands after repairing the roof of the house of his sister destroyed by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. Figueroa, who was visiting for a month at her sister Eneida’s house when the Hurricane Maria hit the area, also lost her home in the Arroyo community. He waits for a relative to come from Boston and take him to Boston. He says that he is 70 years old and all his life working can’t continue in these conditions in Puerto Rico. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

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Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

A member of the Puerto Rican National Guard delivers food and water brought via helicopter to victims of Hurricane Maria, to the San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

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Morovis, Puerto Rico

Rafael Reyes embraces his wife Xarelis Negron and his son Xariel as they stand next to thier belongings, in front of the remains of their home destroyed by Hurricane Maria, in the San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. The Reyes family lost all their belongings and their house, and are looking forward to being able to rebuild and continue their life. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

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Residents carry water and MREs received from FEMA about two weeks after Hurricane Maria swept through the island on Oct. 5, 2017 in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. Residents in their section of the town remain without grid power or running water although a few have been able to acquire generators for power. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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San Isidro, Puerto Rico

Resident Mirian Medina stands on her property about two weeks after Hurricane Maria swept through the island on Oct. 5, 2017 in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. Residents in her section of the town remain without grid power or running water. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage including most of the electrical, gas and water grid as well as agriculture after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, swept through. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Ceiba, Puerto Rico

A resident uses a plastic bag to move downed power cables so he can drive underneath them in a neighborhood following Hurricane Maria in Ceiba, Puerto Rico, Oct. 4, 2017. (Photo: Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

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Cars drive in the darkness in a neighbourhood that has no electricity, after Hurricane Maria in Caguas, Puerto Rico, Oct. 4, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters)

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Jayuya, Puerto Rico

Local residents ride a horse by a destroyed building after Hurricane Maria in Jayuya, Puerto Rico, Oct. 4, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters)

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Las Piedras, Puerto Rico

Kerialys Aldea de Jesus sits on bottled water at the Jose de Diego Elementary School where residents file FEMA forms for federal aid in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017. Even those happy with the federal aid effort for the U.S. territory’s 3.4 million people said they resented President Donald Trump’s tweets about some Puerto Ricans being lazy and ungrateful. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

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A man stands inside of a destroyed supermarket by Hurricane Maria in Salinas, Puerto Rico, Sept. 29, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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Hurricane survivors receive food and water being given out by volunteers and municipal police as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 28, 2017 in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Sailors aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) observe as an MH-60 Sea Hawk helicopter transfers pallets of supplies from the fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) during replenishment-at-sea for continuing operations as part of Hurricane Maria relief efforts in Puerto Rico on Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Jacob A. Goff/U.S. Navy/Handout via Reuters)

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Women hug as people line up to board a Royal Caribbean cruise ship that will take them to the U.S. mainland, in San Juan, Puerto Rico Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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A resident bails water from a flooded home in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Catano, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

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U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Cody M. Freeman, an aviation electrician assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU), carries a box of supplies at Jose Aponte de la Torre Airport in Puerto Rico, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo : Lance Cpl. Cody J. Ohira/U.S. Marine Corps via Getty Images)

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Irma Maldanado stands with Sussury her parrot in what is left of her home that was destroyed when Hurricane Maria passed through on Sept. 27, 2017 in Corozal, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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People wait in line as they hope to fill up their vehicles with gas in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on September 27, 2017 in Corozal, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Marta Sostre Vazquez reacts as she starts to wade into the San Lorenzo Morovis river with her family, after the bridge was swept away by Hurricane Maria, in Morovis, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. The family was returning to their home after visiting family on the other side. (Photo: Gerald Herbert/AP)

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Travelers stand in line outside of Luis Muoz Marn International Airport after Hurricane Maria disrupted flight service in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. President Donald Trump said he may temporarily suspend a law that restricts the use of foreign ships operating in U.S. waters and between U.S. ports in order to accelerate the delivery of aid to Puerto Rico, where his administration faces mounting criticism over its response to Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Alex Wroblewski/ Bloomberg)

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Single mother Omayra Cruz, 44, returned from a food distribution with a box she would share with 4-year-old son Nene. But the two were still living without a roof, sleeping under the stars next to a pig pen, and a picture of the Last Supper. Their water tank had a few inches left. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

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People affected by Hurricane Maria collect water in the mountains in Naranjito, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. The relief effort from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico has so far been concentrated largely in San Juan, and many outside the capital say they’ve received little or no help. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

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Neighbors sit on a couch outside their destroyed homes as sun sets in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017. (Photo: Gerald Herbert/AP)

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People affected by Hurricane Maria collect water in the mountains in Naranjito, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

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A dog is seen during the nightfall at a house destroyed by the passage of Hurricane Maria in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on September 26, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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Rafael Robles-Ortiz kisses his mother Josefina Ortiz who is staying at the Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados facility which cares for the elderly as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 26, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mr. Robles-Ortiz is concerned for his mother and hopes aid — including fuel for the facilities generators, as well as food and medicine for his mother — gets through after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, devastated the island. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Workers repairs electrical installations after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 26, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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People make line at night at an ATM to withdraw money in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 25, 2017, where a 7pm-6am curfew has been imposed following impact of Hurricane Maria on the island. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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A person waves to a passing helicopter from inside a damaged home as people deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 25, 2017 in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Flooded streets in San Juan on Sept. 25, 2017. Nearly one week after hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, residents are still trying to get the basics of food, water, gas, and money from banks. Much of the damage done was to electrical wires, fallen trees, and flattened vegetation, in addition to home wooden roofs torn off. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

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Residents from La Perla carry a piece of metal through the streets after Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Sept. 25, 2017. The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

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Two people sit in an apartment with a wall missing along the waterfront in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 25, 2017. Nearly one week after hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, residents are still trying to get the basics of food, water, gas, and money from banks. Much of the damage done was to electrical wires, fallen trees, and flattened vegetation, in addition to home wooden roofs torn off. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

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A doctor checks the eyes of Hilda Colon at a shelter set up at the Pedrin Zorrilla coliseum after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 25, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia/ Reuters)

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A combination of NOAA Satellite images taken at night shows Puerto Rico before and after Hurricane Maria – Puerto Rico on July 24, 2014 (top) and after Hurricane Maria knocked out power grid in Puerto Rico taken on Sept. 24, 2017. (Photo: NASA/NOAA GOES Project/Handout via Reuters)

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Family members collect belongings after hurricane force winds destroyed their house in Toa Baja, west of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria.
Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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A house destroyed by hurricane winds is seen in Toa Alta, southwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria.
Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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Lizzy Alicea becomes emotional as she speaks about the lack of aide that is reaching her mother’s home town September 24, 2017 in Hayales de Coamo, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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A man uses his shirt to carry bottles of water during a distribution of relief items, after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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A man rides his bicycle through a damaged road in Toa Alta, west of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria.
Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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Soldiers of Puerto Rico’s national guard distribute relief items to people, after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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Carmen Marrero takes a rest while she cleans debris from her house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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People fill containers with water on the street after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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Orisnela Solano hugs her daughter, Laura Goenaga as they attend a church service at the Parroquia Nuestra Senora de la Asuncion church September 24, 2017 in Aibonito, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Karlian Mercado,7, walks among the rubble that remains of her families home September 24, 2017 in Hayales de Coamo, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Marry Ann Aldea loss everything at her house after the winds of hurricane Maria ripped away her roof. The mountain town of Juncos is one of the most affected after the pass of Hurricane María. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. (Photo: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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Yadira Nieves carries her daughter as they look at water flowing over the road at the dam of the Guajataca lake after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Guajataca, Puerto Rico, Sept. 23, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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U.S. Coast Guard personnel survey the damage to an oil dock after Hurricane Maria passed through the area on Sept. 23, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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People walk on a flooded street in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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Aerial photo of the floadings in the costal town of Loiza, in the north shore of Puerto Rico on sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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Julio Ortiz Montanez drinks water at the Jose Robles Otero Elementary School after the passing of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. Because of the heavy rains brought by Maria, thousands of people were evacuated from Toa Baja after the municipal government opened the gates of the Rio La Plata Dam. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

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People stop on a highway near a mobile phone antenna tower to check for mobile phone signal, after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria, in Dorado, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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Line outside a Supermarket in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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People line up to buy gasoline at a gas station after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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Chairs are seen in front of a flooded house in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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Gloria Lynn cries next to a salon that was flooded after the rains related to the passage of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 22, 2017.(Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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Cars drive through a flooded road in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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People rest outside a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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Dead horses lay on the side of the road after the passing of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, Friday, September 22, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

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A man walks on a flooded street in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan Puerto Rico, late on Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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The day after Hurricane Maria made a direct hit on Puerto Rico, residents of Isla Palmeras (translated as Palmeras Island) a neighborhood in San Juan, are surrounded by water on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

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Damaged sail boats washed ashore are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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Inhabitants stand in flood water in front of a house flooded in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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A man uses a stand up paddle board to row down a street flooded by Hurricane Maria in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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ARABIAN SEA (April 14, 2007) - An MH-60S Seahawk, from the “Predators” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23, flies near USS Vella Gulf (CG 72) during a replenishment at sea between USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10) and Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group is on deployment in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman John Wagner (RELEASED)

PACIFIC OCEAN (May 24, 2015) An MH-60S Seahawk helicopter assigned to the “Indians” of Combat Helicopter Squadron (HSC) 6, provides plane guard during carrier qualifications, while embarked aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). Reagan is underway off the coast of Southern California for training. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j. g. Joseph Pfaff/Released)

APPROACH FOR LANDING

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Indians of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC 6) makes an approach for landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Alex Corona/Released)