mgifs: films

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These opening and closing scenes are two of the most brilliantly written scenes in Gone Girl, at least to me. I really like the idea of these scenes. I think the main idea of starting and ending the film with these scenes is to show us how different Amy Dunne is, how extreme her change is, or I should say; how her husband and all the things happening throughout the whole movie can change her tremendously. We can see in the opening scene, just like how Gillian Flynn describes it, that Amy is giving a look of alarm. That probably means that Amy is under her husband’s control, that Amy might be frightened of her husband because her husband uses her for some inappropriate purposes which makes Amy sees her husband as some kind of threat.

Then look at the closing scene where Amy gives a very different facial expression and movement compared with what she gives in the opening scene. She gives her husband a haunting smile, which means that she has changed into a kind of psychotic woman who is now no longer under her husband’s control, in fact she is the one who’s controlling. She might be a threat for her husband now, and that happens because of her husband himself, because of what he did and has done to his wife, because he didn’t treat his wife well. In other words, he has created himself a villainous wife.

6

It’s my favorite scene in the movie. Kitchen scene, let’s call it.

6

Powers, what powers, what are you talking about? You see something strange here? Nothing anybody would believe if you told them?

Once upon a time, while the village was sleeping, a she-wolf crept from the world below to the world above. She meant no harm to anyone, but someone meant harm to her. Wounded by a man, she ran, and she ran, and she ran some more. And in a church graveyard she lay when a priest found her there. “Are you God’s work, or the Devil’s? Oh, what do I care whose work you are? You poor, silent creature.” He tended to her wound and told her, “It will heal. In time.” And the wound did heal. She was just a girl, after all, who’d strayed from the path in the forest and remembered what she’d found there. She ran, and ran, and ran some more, returning to the place from whence she came. Quietly, she slipped back to the world below.
—   The Company of Wolves, 1984