mexico us border

independent.co.uk
Donald Trump is going to publish a weekly list of crimes committed by immigrants
Donald Trump has ordered his new administration to publish a weekly list of crimes committed by immigrants. The US President’s sweeping new executive order on immigration, which he signed on the fifth day of his presidency, includes a paragraph mandating the Secretary for Homeland Security to “make public a comprehensive list of criminal actions committed by aliens” in the US. The list will also include details of so-called “sanctuary cities” that refuse to hand over immigrant residents for deportation.

Donald Trump is a Nazi. He has assembled a cabinet of Nazis to run his fascist regime. He doesn’t call himself a Nazi, because Nazis never do. From the start “Nazi” was an insult. We all now face a choice in how to respond to this. We can either resist or collaborate. There are no other options. This is a decision we all face, but it is a particularly pertinent choice for the American people, and, crucially, the political establishment in America. Both Republican and Democrat politicians need to choose, are they going to resist or collaborate?

Make your choice now, before people start being rounded up and put in camps, before tanks roll out and bombs start falling. If enough people choose to resist now then the worst can still be avoided.

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So it turns out that a remarkably large amount of the US-Mexico border is defined by the Rio Grande. Like, Texas’s border with Mexico. 

The river doesn’t provide a meaningful barrier to migration: the Amazon it ain’t. But its existence poses a core problem for Trump’s wall that no one seems to mention: where do you put the border wall in relation to the river?

–you could put it on the US side, as we are legally entitled to do, but then the US effectively cedes the water to Mexico. I imagine farmers and ranchers across Texas might not be enthused by this option.

–we could put it in the middle of the river, on the actual border, and magically divide the water in half … if, you know, you wanted to build a wall in the middle of a river, and thought that hydrodynamics were the same as cutting a piece of cake.

–Trump could build it on the Mexican side of the river, take all the water, and commit an act of war by seizing Mexican territory … if the US didn’t mind being a pariah nation and potentially fighting an honest to god war on the southern boundary of Texas. Again.

This seems like something that ought to be worked out before we start building the wall. It’s not a detail to work out later.

On Jan. 25, President Trump signed an executive order instructing construction to begin on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Environmentalists and civil rights activists say the proposed wall on the southern border with Mexico is a threat to the environmental rights of the people who live on both sides of the border.

“When you have such beautiful wilderness areas as we have here in Arizona, the idea of putting this large wall that prevents the migration of animals, that scars the earth itself, and especially knowing how ineffectual it is, is something that is just sad,” said Juanita Molina, the executive director of Border Action Network, an organization that advocates for the health and wellness of people who live along the border. “The reality is that border communities are porous by nature.”

Molina, who lives in Benson, Ariz., said the wall could cause flooding and debris build-up on both sides of the border. (Chris Clarke of KCET has reported that a concrete wall “would cause catastrophic flooding in the desert.”) Molina also said there could be legal and ethical consequences if people try to build on the land of the Tohono O'odham Nation, whose reservation straddles the border, and whose leaders have spoken out for years against a border wall. But even if no part of the wall materializes, she said, the rhetoric around it has already caused rifts in her community.

The Environmental Consequences Of A Wall On The U.S.-Mexico Border

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Trump wants $1B to build a portion of the border wall that would barely span Rhode Island

  • President Donald Trump is set to ask for $1 billion to fund the first stage of his border wall, a chunk of change that will cover just 48 miles of new wall, CNN reported Tuesday.
  • The 48 new miles of border wall is a chunk so small it would just cover the length of Rhode Island — the smallest of the 50 states. Another chunk of the requested $1 billion is to repair 14 existing miles of border fencing. Read more. (3/28/17, 1:03PM)
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When you think of illegal immigration in the U.S., do you picture a border crosser or a visa overstayer? A family or a single person? A farmworker or a waiter?

People living in the U.S. without legal status are frequently invoked in American politics — especially in recent months. But the conversation is often short on facts about the millions of people who fall into this category.

There are, however, outdated beliefs: A Pew Research Center survey in 2015 found that very few Americans are aware of recent changes in immigration patterns.

And, of course, there are stereotypes, which often don’t always match up with reality. Most people in the U.S. illegally have been here for years, for instance, and people working service jobs far outnumber migrant farm labor.

Here’s a look at the actual statistics about people living in the U.S. illegally.

How America’s Idea Of Illegal Immigration Doesn’t Always Match Reality

Charts by Alyson Hurt

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Think about the avocados you mash for your Super Bowl guacamole, or the fresh tomatoes you enjoy in the winter. There’s a good chance they came from Mexico.

Our southern neighbor is the United States’ leading supplier of fresh produce, providing 70 percent of the fresh vegetables we import and more than 40 percent of our fresh fruit imports. That trade has boomed since NAFTA — the North American Free Trade Agreement — was signed in 1994.

President Trump’s repeated campaign threats to pull out of NAFTA and impose a tax on Mexican imports have caused jitters for Wholesum and other businesses on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Amid Talk Of Tariffs, What Happens To Companies That Straddle The Border?

Photos by Elissa Nadworny/NPR

nytimes.com
Opinion | Our Fake Democracy
Remember when Republicans used to pretend to care about crafting the people’s business in sunlight?
By Timothy Egan

Timothy Egan at NYT:

On almost every single concern, Congress — whether it’s the misnamed People’s House, or the Senate, laughably mischaracterized as the world’s greatest deliberative body — is going against what most of the country wants. And Congress is doing this because there will be no consequences.

We have a fake democracy, growing less responsive and less representative by the day.

The biggest example of this is the monstrosity of a health care bill, which a cartel of Republicans finally allowed us to peek at on Thursday. The lobbyists have seen it; of course. But for the rest us, our first look at a radical overhaul of one-sixth of the economy, something that touches every American, comes too late to make our voices heard.

Crafted in total darkness, the bill may pass by a slim majority of people who have not read it. Inevitably, with something that deprives upward of 23 million Americans of health care, people will die because of this bill. States will be making life and death decisions as they drop the mandated benefits of Obamacare and cut vital care for the poor, the elderly, the sick and the drug-addicted through Medicaid. The sunset of Obamacare is the dawn of death panels.

It would be understandable if Republicans were doing this because it’s what most Americans want them to do. But it’s not. Only about 25 percent of Americans approved of a similar version of this bill, the one passed by the House. By a nearly 2 to 1 margin, people would prefer that the Affordable Care Act be kept in place and fixed, rather than junked for this cruel alternative.

The Senate bill is “by far, the most harmful piece of legislation I have seen in my lifetime,” said Senator Bernie Sanders. At age 75, he’s seen a lot.

[…]

Our fake democracy reveals itself daily. Less than a third of Americans support President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement. In a truly representative government, you would see the other two-thirds, the common-sense majority, howling from the halls of Congress.

Most Americans are also against building a wall along the Mexican border. They would prefer putting taxpayers’ billions into roads, bridges, schools and airports. But the wall remains a key part of President Trump’s agenda.

Trump is president, of course, despite losing the popular vote by nearly 3 million people. Almost 60 percent of the public is against him now. In a parliamentary system, he’d be thrown out in a no-confidence vote. In our system, he’s primed to change life for every citizen, against the wishes of a majority of Americans. Try calling that a democracy while keeping a straight face.

The editorial from The New York Times’ Timothy Egan called “Our Fake Democracy” is a must-read, especially in regards to the GOP’s ramming of Trumpcare down the throats of the American people, the withdrawal of the Paris Climate Agreement, and other host of items unpopular with the majority of the American populace.

Top 10 Facts Of The Day (March 21, 2017)

10. According to Cunningham’s Law, the best way to find a correct answer on the internet is not to ask a question, instead post the wrong answer and people would be eager to correct you in the first place.

9. Stephen Hawking could have sounded more natural using modern day synthesizers; however, he prefers to keep his original robotic tone believing that it defines his identity.

8. in 2016 Beyoncé launched a clothing range aimed at “supporting and inspiring” women. A month later it was revealed female sweatshop workers were being paid less than $1 an hour to make the clothing

7. In 1973, China proposed to give the U.S 10 million Chinese women to boost population.

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