CLACKERS (The orange balls with the string)

Two resin balls on string with a metal ring in the middle. You timed it so they hit at the top and bottom of their arc. Sometimes they flew off the string and literally put someone’s eye out. They were all the rage in the ‘70s until they were banned. I found these at my parents house.

The bowl is the real find, by a Mexican artist Marnes from Michoacan, Mexico circa 2001. Score!

Frida Kahlo disliked white capitalism intensely, so I would recommend not buying images of her on socks or whatever from big box stores especially if you’re white.

What I would recommend instead is make your own art and design inspired by her. She taught underprivileged teenagers art in the years leading up to her death. Her class was multicultural due to Mexico accepting refugees from WW2 including Jewish people(she herself was half German Jewish). She was very pro DIY and I think would’ve been flattered by fan art that’s not sold for money. 


The 16 most inspiring things about bisexual artist Frida KahloMexican painter Frida Kahlo was born 107 years ago today July 6, 1907. A feisty free spirit who blazed her own trail and inspired everyone around her.

Frida Kahlo is one of the most revered artists to come from 20th century Mexico. Her distinctive look and style are instantly recognizable and she has been called a diva, a muse and a feminist icon.

A force of nature perhaps best summed up by an art critic who saw one of her very first exhibitions and said: ‘It is impossible to separate the life and work of this extraordinary person. Her paintings are her biography.’

She fought through a great deal of adversity during her life. At the age of six she contracted polio, when she was 18 she was badly injured in a bus crash and later in life she suffered several miscarriages … Kahlo never lost her passion for life. She was well known as an extremely quick witted and sharp woman, always the centre of attention wherever she was. Her strength of character has made her an emblem of hope and determination for many.

Art historians usually focus on her relationship with fellow Mexican painter Diego Rivera (whom she married, divorced and then married again) and her affair with Communist leader Leon Trotsky. But Kahlo was bisexual, and made no secret of her affairs and relationships with women as well as men. Kahlo was linked with African American entertainer Josephine Baker, American painter Georgia O’Keeffe and Mexican singer Chavela Vargas.

Photographers were captivated by her beauty. She was a muse to photographer Nickolas Murray who loved to take her picture in her sumptuous Mexican clothes.

Her work has been exhibited in art galleries all over the world, her diary has been published and many authors have written biographies of her extraordinary life.The house she lived in is now a museum. La Casa Azul is filled with trinkets and treasure collected by Kahlo during her life and is one of the biggest cultural attractions in Mexico.

She defied classification of her work. Art critics tried to label her as a Surrealist painter, which was very trendy at the time, but she defied this label, instead saying: ‘They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.’

In 1938 André Breton, principal initiator of the surrealist movement, described Kahlo’s art as a “ribbon around a bomb”.

Artist Elizabeth Catlett, who said the purpose of her art was to “present black people in their beauty and dignity for ourselves and others to understand and enjoy,” was born on this day in 1915. 

[Elizabeth Catlett. Sharecropper. 1952, published 1968-70. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 José Sanchez / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VEGAP, Spain]