mexican actresses

5

María de los Dolores Asúnsolo López-Negrete; August 3, 1904 – April 11, 1983, was a Mexican actress who was the first major female Latin American crossover star in Hollywood, with a career in American films in the 1920s and 1930s. She was also considered one of the more important female figures of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema in the 1940s and 1950s. Del Río is remembered as one of the most beautiful faces of the cinema in her time. Her long and varied career spanned silent film, sound film, television, stage and radio.

After being discovered in Mexico by the filmmaker Edwin Carewe, she began her film career in 1925. She had roles in a series of successful silent films like What Price Glory? (1926), Resurrection (1927) and Ramona (1928). During this period she came to be considered a sort of feminine version of Rudolph Valentino, a “female Latin Lover”.[8] With the advent of sound, she acted in films that included Bird of Paradise (1932), Flying Down to Rio (1933), Madame Du Barry (1934) and Journey into Fear (1943). In the early 1940s, when her Hollywood career began to decline, del Río returned to Mexico and joined the Mexican film industry, which at that time was at its peak.

When del Río returned to her native country, she became one of the more important promoters and stars of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. A series of films, including Wild Flower (1943), María Candelaria (1943), Las Abandonadas (1944), Bugambilia (1944) and The Unloved Woman (1949), are considered classic masterpieces and helped boost Mexican cinema worldwide. Del Río remained active in Mexican films throughout the 1950s. She also worked in Argentina and Spain.

In 1960 she returned to Hollywood. During the next years she appeared in Mexican and American films. From the late 1950s until the early 1970s she also successfully ventured into theater in Mexico and appeared in some American television series. Del Río performed her final screen appearance in 1978. After a period of inactivity and ill health, del Río died in 1983 at the age of 78.

Dolores del Río is a mythical figure in Latin America and is considered representative, par excellence, of the feminine face of Mexico in the whole world

“Dolores del Río born María de los Dolores Asúnsolo López-Negrete; August 3, 1904 - April 11, 1983) was a Mexican actress who was the first major female Latin American crossover star in Hollywood, with a career in American films in the 1920s and 1930s. 

She was also considered one of the more important female figures of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema in the 1940s and 1950s. Her long and varied career spanned silent film, sound film, television, stage and radio.”

More info on Dolores del Río  

cbr.com
15 Reasons Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Is The Best Superhero TV Show
Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. flawlessly connects to the MCU, to Marvel Comics, to Agent Carter and Hydra -- which makes it the best superhero show on TV.

LOVE!  LOVE this article!   

HERE is the link to the tweet so you can share it on Twitter too!

No superhero show would be complete without a brilliant tech support team. On “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” Jemma Simmons and Leopold Fitz provide that support as the dynamic duo “FitzSimmons.”

Their teamwork and friendship over the last four seasons has blossomed into a remarkable romance. They have been through thick and thin together: When Jemma was infected by the Chitauri helmet in Season 1, Fitz exposed himself to the infection to come up with the vaccine to save her. In Season 2, Jemma and Fitz’s relationship was painfully strained because of Fitz’s brain damage. In Season 3, when Jemma vanished into the Monolith and was sent to the exile planet Maveth, Fitz moved heaven and earth to find her and rescue her. Their friendship, their love for one another, their constant belief in one another is a powerful reminder that love can endure, even in the midst of harrowing conditions, like Hive, Hydra, and LMD takeovers. Their love on “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” is completely unmatched by any other superhero show that’s currently on television.


“Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” is the best superhero show on television because of its amazing cast. Each actor brings such depth, such emotion, and such intensity to his or her role. The casting is strengthened by its unmatched diversity. While most superhero shows feature one or two men or women from different ethnic or national backgrounds, “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” continuously casts men and women of different ages, skin tones, and nationalities.

For instance, Clark Gregg is a Caucasian-American man who is well into his 50’s. Coulson is both super dad and super spy, and that’s not a role a 20-year-old could play. Ming-Na Wen is Chinese American, also in her 50’s. She could have been typecast as someone’s mother, instead “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” booked her as “The Cavalry,” the most feared woman in all of S.H.I.E.L.D. Chloe Bennet is also Chinese American and is in her 20s. Elizabeth Henstridge and Iain de Caestecker are both 29 and are both citizens of the United Kingdom. Henry Simmons is in his 40s and is African-American. Natalia Cordova-Buckley is a Mexican actress in her 30s. The diversity in age, ethnicity, and nationality sets this show apart from every other superhero show on television.

I randomly bumped into a new Netflix show called Ingobernable and when I saw mexican actress Kate del Castillo was on it I just had to watch it. She’s fantastic, I loved her job on La Reina del Sur (another great show available on Netflix).
Now, back to Ingobernable, this show is SO GOOD. I mean it. The plot is really good and the acting is on point. There’s real mexican people, not only the white-washed ones. There’s LGBT people. There’s women kicking some ass.
Please, watch Ingobernable!!!!

Mexican actress Rosaura Revueltas in Mexico City, 1956

Rosaura Revueltas made one film in Hollywood, Salt of the Earth. It tells the story of Mexican American mine workers and the harsh working conditions they were forced to work under. Salt of the Earth ended up being the only film to be ever actually be blacklisted during the red scare. During the filming of Salt of the Earth, Revueltas was deported and then blacklisted under the alleged claim that there had been passport violations. Her remaining scenes had to be filmed using a double. Despite this, she was awarded a Best Actress award by the Académie du cinéma de Paris in 1956. Due to the blacklist, she stayed away from films, acting in German theater until 1960 and writing her own plays. She would not appear in another film until 1976.