methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus

The Signs as Fatal Diseases

Aries - Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Taurus - Necrotising Fasciitis (Flesh-eating virus)

Gemini - Fatal Familial Insomnia

Cancer - Meningococcal disease / cerebrospinal meningitis

Leo - Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

Virgo - Bubonic plague (Black Death)

Libra - Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)

Scorpio - Diarrhea

Sagittarius - Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker Syndrome 

Capricorn - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

Aquarius - Ebola 

Pisces - Cholera

After getting a cut, many Americans will reach for a tube of over-the-counter antibiotic cream to ward off infection. But that widespread habit, a new paper suggests, may be contributing to the rise of one of the most concerning strains of drug-resistant bacteria.

Japanese researchers looked at 261 samples of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including two samples of the USA300 strain, a type of MRSA that has gained attention for its spread, its frequent presence in the community as well as the hospital, and its link to necrotizing fasciitis, also known as flesh-eating disease.

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If you’ve been keeping up with our multi-part series about how some old-timey medicine was just as advanced as medicine is today, you’ll understand why scientists love trying out recipes that they find in historic textbooks. At worst, they’ve ruined several hundred dollars of lab equipment – at best, they might discover the elixir of life.

Case in point: the millennia-old recipe that turned out to be capable of killing the modern-day superbug MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, for the medical nerds out there).

It all began after the wacky future-sitcom pairing of Freya Harrison, a microbiologist, and Christina Lee, a historian, who tried their hand at experimenting with a recipe from the Anglo-Saxon medical textbookBald’s Leechbook, which as of this writing isn’t available in an eBook format. After gathering the necessary ingredients (and trying to find those that most closely matched their historic counterparts), they created their brew and let it stand for the nine days dictated by the recipe (which we can’t help but read with a witchy tone of voice).

Testing their concoction on several scraps of MRSA-infected skin, they found that it killed 90 percent of the bacteria, making it equally as strong as the modern-day antibiotic currently used to treat the disease. 

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A 1,000-year-old treatment for eye infections could hold the key to killing antibiotic-resistant superbugs, experts have said. Scientists recreated a 9th Century Anglo-Saxon remedy using onion, garlic and part of a cow’s stomach. They were “astonished” to find it almost completely wiped out methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, otherwise known as MRSA. Their findings will be presented at a national microbiology conference. The remedy was found in Bald’s Leechbook – an old English manuscript containing instructions on various treatments held in the British Library. Anglo-Saxon expert Dr Christina Lee, from the University of Nottingham, translated the recipe for an “eye salve”, which includes garlic, onion or leeks, wine and cow bile. Experts from the university’s microbiology team recreated the remedy and then tested it on large cultures of MRSA. http://www.cryptogon.com/?p=46313

A 1,000-year-old treatment for eye infections could hold the key to killing antibiotic-resistant superbugs, experts have said.

Scientists recreated a 9th Century Anglo-Saxon remedy using onion, garlic and part of a cow’s stomach.

They were “astonished” to find it almost completely wiped out methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, otherwise known as MRSA.

Their findings will be presented at a national microbiology conference.

The remedy was found in Bald’s Leechbook – an old English manuscript containing instructions on various treatments held in the British Library.

Anglo-Saxon expert Dr Christina Lee, from the University of Nottingham, translated the recipe for an “eye salve”, which includes garlic, onion or leeks, wine and cow bile.

Experts from the university’s microbiology team recreated the remedy and then tested it on large cultures of MRSA.