meteorite

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But there is no denying that it’s hip to be square. 

1) Fluorite - La Facciata quarry, Carrara, Apuan Alps, Massa-Carrara Province, Tuscany, Italy 

2) Rare, deep royal blue Halite on Sylvite - PCA Intrepid Potash Mine, Carlsbad, New Mexico

3) Fluorite and Zeunerite - Montoso Quarries, Bagnolo Piemonte, Cuneo Province, Piedmont, Italy Photo by: Giuseppe Finello

4) Purple fluorite on baryte. Photo by: Mario Miglioli 

5) Pyrite with purple fluorite inclusions

6) Pallasite Meteorite

7) Iron Meteorite

8) Paulingite - Czech Republic

9) Fluorite - El Hammam Mine, Meknès-Tafilalet Region, Morocco 

10)  Fluorite, Minerva Mine, Hardin Co., Illinois, USA.  Photo: DI Anton Watzl

Scientists discover origins of ancient Hopewell culture's meteorite jewellery

The native Hopewell culture, which thrived along rivers and streams in North America from 200BC to 500AD, is today survived by a number of beautiful artefacts made from exotic materials – including copper and silver.

But perhaps the most exotic Hopewell artefacts are those made from iron extracted from meteorites. It is not known how these artefacts were viewed among the Hopewell, but what is certain is that they were extremely scarce due to the fact that meteoritic iron is so rare.

In 1945, researchers discovered 22 beads made of meteoritic iron, hidden in a burial mound at the Havana site in Illinois. A number of studies over the following decades attempted to describe these mysterious beads, analyse their chemical composition and understand their significance for the Hopewell people. Read more.

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Beautiful pallasite meteorite slab - each of those crystals is the mineral olivine and they’re a couple cm across. When polished, they tend to let light right through them. The surrounding material is iron - remnant of an iron core in an asteroid that was shattered.