metaphorical

People will hold and admire roses so much, they don’t ever realize they’re bleeding from the thorns.

They’re so in love with something that they can’t let go, even when they’re getting hurt.

—  excerpt from a book I’ll never write #44 // @loveactivist

Realization that took me about 25 years: when Emperor Palpatine tells Luke “Strike me down with all your hatred, and your journey towards the Dark Side will be complete,” he’s not saying something deep about the nature of evil and the ease of turning into the bad guy.  He’s just making a last-ditch gambit to not get his ass lightsabered.  Luke’s kind of a sucker for falling for it.

Luke’s already decided violence is an acceptable tactic, based on the dozens of nameless troopers and pilots he’s blasted into subatomic particles, so why would the Emperor be any different?  Killing the Emperor isn’t going to make Luke a different kind of killer just because he killed someone with a visible face, and it’s certainly not going to make him start blowing up planets or torturing prisoners just for funsies.  Luke could have said “Strike you down? Don’t mind if I do,” done just that, and not only would the battle have ended the same way, his dad might have survived.

(And if Vader had survived, repented, and rejoined the Light Side, but retained his influence over the Imperial military, he could have saved everyone a whole lot of grief in the coming years.)

The point is, sometimes when your enemies say “You’re playing right into my hands!  The harder you oppose me, the more power I get!”, they’re actually just scared and full of bullshit.  Never forget to consider that possibility.

I sense the world might be more dreamlike, metaphorical, and poetic than we currently believe—but just as irrational as sympathetic magic when looked at in a typically scientific way. I wouldn’t be surprised if poetry—poetry in the broadest sense, in the sense of a world filled with metaphor, rhyme, and recurring patterns, shapes, and designs—is how the world works. The world isn’t logical, it’s a song.
—  David Byrne in Bicycle Diaries.

Reminds me of the writings of Freda Mathews.

i have a few food aversions. when i tell people this, at first they’re horrified. ice cream? you can’t eat ice cream? oh i had a terrible stomach bug, once, and it was involved. oh, you poor thing. 

first time i tried tequlia i thought it was like vodka and did nine shots in an hour and ended up in the hospital. five years later i can finally drink it again but i no longer can do shots in any situation. same, buddy, happens to the best of us.

can’t eat nutella. i thought you liked it? used to love it before i was allergic and now it gives me itches. sorry about that, i feel for you.

milk? always. what about milk and cookies, i’ve seen you eat that. sometimes, if i’m careful, and other things are in my stomach, my allergy to lactose is okay. sometimes i can have quite a lot in one day. sometimes none at all. makes sense, okay.

i can’t look at bare razors. specifically, x-acto blades. if they’re in a holder they’re okay. but if they’re out and by themselves my brain starts to shout things. when people tell me to lose weight, sirens start sounding. 

but you can’t tell people that. “triggered” is a joke now. what, are you triggered by a dropped plate?

i don’t like to eat meat if i don’t know where it came from. oh, that’s fine, then. i don’t like to listen to certain songs because they remind me of when bad things were happening. i don’t get it, though. it’s over and done with.

His Mind Created the Perfect Metaphor

Dear BBC Sherlock community,

Ever since Sherlock series 4 came out, collectively we were like “what the HELL is this?!?! This doesn’t make any sense!” BUT after many months of tossing ideas around the fandom, we have made theories that could explain the weirdness, but nothing we can all agree on. Now, this meta here may be absolute garbage to you, but I believe, in my heart of hearts, I’ve solved it. Please read it in its entirety with an open mind before you reblog it just to tell me I suck.

Thanks in advance, you da best

Paige


Here’s the short version: Sherlock actually jumped at the end of The Reichenbach Fall, just as Doyle intended him to die. Gatiss and Moffat said they are correcting something in this adaptation that no one else has gotten right before. Many of us assumed the homosexual romance was the one thing they were changing, but we were punched in the face right after The Final Problem came out.  Gatiss and Moffat are changing the sacrifice. Holmes was intended to die for his friends but Doyle needed more money and rewrote the series after “The Final Problem”. That turned Holmes’ sacrifice into a cruel joke against Watson. This is what BBC Sherlock is fixing, and we’re about to see it come to fruition.

I know many theorists despise the homosexual reading of Holmes and Watson, while many people in general despise theorists on this site. That’s fine, I don’t care how people feel about gay theories and/or TJLC and its followers.  But I’m here to tell you TJLC, at its core as a concept, was right. You may hate Moffat and Gatiss, you may think Sherlock is a piece of shit show, and that’s fine, you do you. But hear this one meta out, please. I think even the hardest skeptic can at least apprectiate the thought and logic behind this.

Keep reading