metal-detector

Tour of Mythicality show-goer’s tips [no spoilers]

This post is only about the pure logistics of attending the Tour of Mythicality, including what you can and cannot bring, what merch to expect, some VIP experience tips, etc:

(for cinnamon rolls such as @thegreyhenley, @madie600, @ladycynthiana@heatgeneratingtechniques and whoever you can think of and tag!! Be prepared to enjoy yourself!!)

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Imagine

Taako is kinda missing having an umbrella as his staff and Lup makes him another one. 
Just like the old one with feather fall and magical but instead of consuming liches and fallen magic users, it vacuums up loot after combat.Or works like a loot/metal detector. 

Support police officers: Thin Blue Line

Support fire fighters: Thin Red Line

Support security guards: Thin Yellow Line

Support TSA agents: Thin Fuchsia Line

Support Bounty Hunters: Thin Burnt-Orange Line

Support Hall Monitors: Thin Cyan Line

Support Neighborhood Watch: Thin Tickle Me Pink® Line

Support the guy who says “go ahead,” giving you the okay to walk through the metal detector: Thin Periwinkle Line 

Support the white lady at the store who isn’t security but follows POC around because they look “suspicious”: Thin Chartreuse Line

anonymous asked:

Supercorp at a baseball game

When Kara asks if she’s free Saturday, she immediately makes sure she is.

When Kara, fingers coated in cheese and salt and salsa, drags her up bleacher after bleacher until they reach the perfect spot, she realizes maybe she should’ve asked why.

“Want one?” A chip is held towards her, cheese slipping off and falling in a clump on the bleacher between them. “It’s okay. I’ll get it.”

She doesn’t wait to see what Kara means by that, turning her attention back to the people milling about the field. A part of her knows what Kara intends, and her stomach twists at the thought.

“All good.”

When she glances down, the cheese is gone and Kara looks unnervingly proud of herself.

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10

My September in Review:

These are photos I have taken during the month which I did not post the day I took them. I hold onto them and see if anything meets my internal criteria for good photos worthy of sharing.

All of the colors and shadows are achieved in camera and with the use of filters during the shoot, I am not a big fan of editing afterwards. 

I live at the beach and see a lot of sunsets, so naturally the things my eyes are used to, and the thing my artistic side likes is shadows and rich colors. You will notice those themes repeated in these pics….Shot with a Canon6D with several different lenses at different settings(UV, Circ PL, and a few other lens filters)

Thanks for following…Hope you enjoy!!!

Archaeologists and Metal Detectorists Find Common Ground

NEW LONDON, Conn. — Keith Wille was metal detecting in the woods of Connecticut a few years ago when he found a triangle of brass about two-and-a-half inches long with a small hole in the middle. He thought little of the find at first, and threw it in his scrap pile. Mr. Wille, 29, is a manager at a survival training company, but spends most of his spare time metal detecting.

In September, Mr. Wille drove from his home here to the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center with several boxes of objects — the highlights of his recent collecting. The museum — a vast, glassy structure that looks like an airport terminal, complete with a 185-foot-tall traffic-control-style tower — is a testament to the years when the Foxwoods Resort Casino made the Pequots the wealthiest tribe in the nation. Although those fortunes have declined, the Pequots are still financing projects by the archaeologist Kevin McBride, who works full time on what Lori A. Potter, a spokeswoman for the Mashantucket Pequot Nation, called “history that’s written by the conquered and not by the conqueror.” Read more.

Flying With a Service Dog

This is based off my personal experience flying with a service dog: 

I have noticed that one thing that is very nerve wracking for many service dog handlers is flying with their service dog for the first time. Not knowing what to expect in a situation that is hard to train for specifically can make a person very anxious. I wanted to write a guide based on my own experience so that people had a comprehensive thing to look at!

Airlines that people have good experiences with:

  • Southwest
    • Southwest is by far the most accommodating. I flew with them. Once notified of my dog, they gave me the seat next to me for free so she could have more room. They printed out a “reserved” sign that I could sit on the seat so that no one could sit there and the flight attendants knew what was going on. They did this for free. 
    • Southwest has free seating. As a disabled person, you get preferred seating so you will be able to board first and get bulkhead if you want it. 
  • Frontier
  • American

Important things your dog should know:

  • A stellar settle.
  • Sit stays. 
  • Follow directions off leash (if you don’t use a metal free lead and want to have your dog go through the metal detector.)
  • Handle very busy areas.
  • Handle VERY loud noises. 
  • A good heel
  • Potty on artificial grass
  • Potty on command
  • A very tight tuck
  • Being okay with strangers touching them.
  • Staying even when you walk away

Before the flight:

  • Tell the airline that you have a service dog. It will make your flight a lot easier if people are alerted to this ahead of time.
  • Ask if you can have bulk head seating. These are the seats at the front of the plane that have much more foot room than any other seat. Most airlines will give you the seating for free.
  • Choose your seat (if you can). I find that sitting by the window is the best place so that your dog doesn’t spill out into the aisle. If you’re flying Southwest, there is open seating. And because you get preferred seating, you can choose whichever one when you get on the plane.
  • Do you need mobility assistance? Did you know there are people at the airport whose sole job is to push people to their destinations in wheelchairs? If you call ahead of time, you can have someone waiting for you at the check in desk to help you!
  • Try to limit your dog’s food and water intake. Your dog can go the day without food and with limited water. I promise they can handle it. It will help with the going to the bathroom situation. You won’t have to worry about it as much. 

What to pack:

  • Are you checking a bag or carrying on? Either is fine! Most airlines will give you a free carry on bag as well as personal item. So for example a backpack and a purse. They will charge you for more. If you need a bag separately for your dog’s things, you need to know this: YOU DON’T HAVE TO PAY FOR BAGS CARRYING MEDICAL EQUIPMENT. And guess what! Your dog’s supplies are part of your medical equipment! So if you need to check a bag for your dog or bring an extra carry on, you do not need to pay!
  • Things to pack for your dog:
    • Small first aid kit
    • Water bottle (empty – you can fill it on the other side of security)
    • Extra collar
    • Extra leash
    • Extra vest
    • Treats
    • 2-3 days worth of dog food
    • Poop bags
    • Portable bowls
    • A mat/blanket for your dog
  • Anything in your carry on that is liquid needs to be in a 3 oz or smaller container and ALSO fit into a quartz sized plastic bag. 

When you get to the airport

  • If you haven’t already printed out your boarding passes at home, you need to do that first. There are kiosks that you can do this without talking to a person, but I highly suggest going up to the desk to do your check in if you can. You’ll be able to remind them about your dog and confirm things like bulkhead seating or assistance. 
  • Once you have your boarding pass and any bags that you’re checking taken care of, make your way towards security. DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS. Find someone who works there – they’re usually wearing blue, or a white shirt with black pants. Airports are big and confusing. Flying with a dog for the first time is scary enough. It can be exacerbated by not having flown alone before.

Security

  • There are a few ways to go about this so I will outline all I can think of!
    • You do not need to remove your dog’s gear, even if there is metal on it. Put everything that you need onto the belt and then go to the metal detector. Put your dog into a sit/stay and walk through when they direct you to. Once you get through, call your dog through after you. The metal detector WILL beep. This is where your dog being okay with strangers touching them is important – your dog will get a quick pat down. That’s it! They may test your hands and your dog’s vest for explosives or chemicals with these little paper pad things, but it isn’t too complicated. 
    • A lot of people use metal free gear when going to the air port to make things easier. you would follow the same steps as above but your dog wouldn’t need to be patted down. 
    • You can also remove your dog’s gear entirely and put it through the belt with all your other belongings. Your dog needs to be good at a sit stay and you need to be able to handle them without gear, but otherwise pretty simple!
  • Grab your stuff afterwards and you’re done!

At the gate

  • There is usually a desk at or near every gate. Regardless of if you reminded them at the check in, go up to the desk and introduce yourself and remind them again of your dog. There may be something else they can do to accommodate you. That, and I find that people are more willing to help you later if they are aware of you. 
  • Wait until your flight!

On the plane

  • Get to your seat and put down any blankets or mats you brought your dog, if any. Have your dog get into a settle/tuck and then sit down. 
  • I have treats ready because I hadn’t flown with my dog before and I was unsure of how she’d handle it. She got nervous during take off and landing so having the treats available is helpful.

That’s it! It’s not as scary as it seems and I’m sure afterwards, you’ll find yourself wondering why you were worried in the first place. I hope that this guide helps the anxiety in the meantime!

omgpurplebird13  asked:

I picture the bat family always getting stopped at customs when they go on a "normal civilian vacation". What do u think causes them to get stopped by security?

-knowing this family, they’ve probably got weapons hidden all over their bodies and now they have to explain why they have so many weapons on them

-with the number of times they’ve gotten injured, chances are that they have tons of metal pins and plates and whatnot so whenever they go through a metal detector it goes off

-Jason probably makes some sort of joke about causing trouble that a guard happens to overhear and then he gets pulled (the rest of the family do not let him live this down)

-Damian gets pulled because he’s Arabic and we all know how that works out (the rest of the family is indignant and makes sure that the security people are aware of that fact, the airport gets a few strongly worded emails from them)

All right, everyone, buckle up: it’s the Workplace AU.

There are no superheroes. There are only board meetings. And coffee.

Bruce is the serious and completely competent CEO of Wayne Enterprises. He’s well on his way to making the company a Global 2000, but… there are some hurdles. 

His staff. They are the hurdles. 

Most of his employees are either hard workers or unremarkable. It’s the few who who can’t be lumped solely into either category that are the problem.

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