meta!jensen

Like all characters, Pharah and Mercy’s personalities are heavily tied into how they play in the game. Pharah is a protector, who views the battlefield from afar. She looks at the bigger picture and aims to protect as many as possible. Mercy is a saviour, on the other hand, and focuses on one person at a time. She comes rushing to their aid and saves people one by one. She focuses on saving people on a personal level. 

Pharah is heavily tied to the concept of justice. Meanwhile, Mercy is obviously tied to, well, mercy. These qualities are heavily linked to one another, and compliment one another. Without mercy, justice can be ruthless and uncaring, as we see Pharah be in her comic. But without justice, mercy becomes enabling, too forgiving of flaws. You could argue that Mercy is more about quick fixes, easing the pain in the moment, whereas Pharah aims to remove the cause of the pain to begin with, more detached from those she saves. This too is informed by how they play, and how we see them depicted in the trailer (both inspiring, but in different ways).

Justice and mercy are dependent on each other. They are both needed in equal measure. In the game, we see that Mercy is most effective when there is a Pharah she can fly away to, stay airborne beside, and reach many more people from such a vantage point. And Pharah, who is so far away from the nitty gritty of battles, yet makes an easy target, is most effective when there is a Mercy not only looking after her and patching her up, but powering her up as well. 

As such, a Pharmercy combo aids both of them in their goals. With a Mercy helping her, Pharah can soar higher, deal more damage to wrongdoers, and stay alive longer so that she may protect more people. With a Pharah helping her, Mercy can escape danger, see the wounded from afar, and expand her reach so that she may save more.

Protecting and saving. Justice and mercy. Pharmercy is not just a combo with great game mechanics, but also a combo for their ideals, purposes, personality. Together they can soar higher and do more in order to protect and save humanity. That is the true strength of this ship, and that is why it is so incredibly real. 

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Supernatural 12x13 “Family Feud” Sneak Peek - Sam and Dean investigate a murder at a museum and learn a ghost from a merchant ship that sank in 1723 may be at the heart of the mystery. They also realize the ship is the same one that Crowley’s son Gavin should have been aboard, so they enlist help from Rowena to track Gavin down. Meanwhile, Kelly Kline, still pregnant with Lucifer’s child, takes refuge with a demon after an angel tries to kill her.

On Fury Road and the value of non-threatening male heroes

So I’ve been re-watching Fury Road and something struck me;

Tom Hardy’s Max is just really non-threatening. Now, that’s weird on a surface level because in story he’s presented as very dangerous. But here’s the thing about the kind of men we’re used to seeing in action movie; They are threatening in their masculinity.

The capitol A Action hero is a fixture in our cultural awareness. Almost without fail this hero is a man (if you have a woman in the role of action hero, it’s almost always proceeded by her gender. She can’t just be the action hero, she is very clearly cast as a FEMALE action hero.) So our male Action hero  is a badass. He’s dangerous, he’s brooding, he’s tough as nails. Sometimes he’s sarcastic and witty, sometimes he’s a moody stud. Point is, despite cultural changes that we see with our Action heroes as different pop culture trends change the flavoring, these men are all pretty much cut from the same mold. And here’s the thing about your typical Action hero; They have this underlying current of threatening masculinity. To put it bluntly, your typical Action hero is really all about cock. They’re intimidating to both their male peers and the women who are cast opposite them. They are toxic masculinity distilled onto our screens.

Now, in recent years we’ve been seeing more varity in our Action heroes. More emotion. Of course, there have always been exceptions (Luke Skywalker is one of the most note worthy male heroes to break this mold, and I think it’s worth noting that he’s often called whiny. Hell, when I was a little kid I loved him, but as a young teenager I thought he was lame. Now I realize that this might well have been because he wasn’t acting like your typical male hero. Maybe that scared me on some level) Anyway, let’s get back to Hardy’s Max. In story he  starts out as frightening, but he is never threatening in the way of your usual Action hero. He’s feral, dangerous, and unpredictable at the start of our story, but he doesn’t have any of that toxic masculinity.  So, we have a mad Max who is dangerous, and seems mad, as it were.  But there’s none of that hyper male Action hero posturing.

Hardy’s Max is a flawed man whose past has almost driven him past the point of no return. To the other characters in the movies he initially seems to be  feral (they don’t have the benefit of hearing his inner thoughts) Max is a frightening, but he’s not a masculine he-man. In fact, the characters in the movie who fall close to what we’re used to seeing in Action heroes are the warboys and their leader. The culture espoused by Immortan Joe is hyper masculine and toxic. The young men who idolize him seem like extreme versions of what we’re used to with our heroes. They’re brainwashed into a society built on toxic masculinity and objectification, and the heroes of the story are the ones fighting against this idea. Interestingly, Furiosa has a lot of traits of your traditional Action hero, but it’s coupled with compassion and self reflection, not because she’s a woman, but because  she’s  a person. Like Max, she is fighting to regain her humanity through helping a group of young women fight for their freedom from a world of toxic masculinity.

So, again back to Max himself. As the movie goes on he regains his sense of self. A big theme int he movie is the objectification and commodification of human life. We see this with Immortan Joe’s ‘wives” as well as with the brainwashed warboys and the use living humans as ‘bloodbags’ and ‘milkers’ Max starts the movie literally strapped to the hood of a car as a hood ornament/living blood bag.  Max is reluctant to help Furiosa and the ‘wives’ at first, but we see him change in a brief period of time. He  regains his humanity through helping others and coming to terms with his own demons. Hardy’s Max is dangerous, but he’s also vulnerable, undeniably so. We see his fear, we see what haunts him, and we see him struggle to survive, and then struggle to come to terms with his past in order to help others have a future. This sets him apart from Mel Gibson’s Max, and in my opinion makes him the better of the two. By the time Max starts really showing his human side, we see a man who is compassionate and half broken, a man who relearns himself by helping others.

Another notable aspect of Max is his relationship with Furiosa. Usually when your typical Action hero is paired with a STRONG INDEPENDENT WOMAN in a movie, there’s this ongoing dynamic of ‘but you’re a girlllllll’ There isn’t respect, because the heroes of the story are acting out the deeply felt internalized misogyny of our own society. They can’t interact as equals because in our cultural minds they are inherently unequal. They are defined by their rigid gender rules, and they act this out like they’re children on a playground crying about cooties. And of course, there’s usually the sexual element, with the heroes constantly griping at/disrespecting one another while it’s played off as repressed attraction all along.Fury Road never once does this. Max and Furiosa are two flawed and broken people trying to survive. There isn’t a split second where Max stops to wonder how a GIRL can be so tough. Once they’re established as allies, they immediately move into a working relationship built on mutual respect and trust. Two scenes come to mind. Firstly, the initial canon chase when Max first shows himself as an ally. There’s one notable moment where Furiosa is standing up out of the roof and Max hands her a gun. That doesn’t seem important, but there’s something about that gesture that’s very c cinematically important. It shows us that they’re a team now, and it shows us that they trust each other. The second notable scene is the “Don’t breathe” moment in the night bog. Max has previously seen that Furiosa is a good shot. He knows that she is the one to trust with this task, so he hands her the gun and lets her use him as a rifle stand. It’s a moment with no dialogue that speaks volumes.

All of this goes to Max as a nonthreatening hero. He never objectifies, disrespects, or distrusts his counterpart. He’s never an alpha male. He’s part of a story that he doesn’t need to dominate with his manly male maleness. Hardy’s Max is a dangerous, vulnerable, and quietly compassionate man who gives respect and trust where it’s due. He has no need to parade and prove his masculinity. In fact, the people doing that are the villains, and isn’t that telling?

Confession

2,500 Followers Drabble

Prompt: “Um…did you move into my house?“

Pairing: Jensen x Reader

Requested by: @tas898


Jensen lets out a huge sigh of relief pulling into his garage. He throws his dark gray SUV in park and hauls ass into his country styled house, suitcases in tow. He’s finally made it home to Austin, after a grueling few weeks of shooting nonstop. 

Sighing dramatically, Jensen decides it’s time to stuff his face with junk food and catch up on Game of Thrones. Humming to himself, he makes way down the hall but then suddenly freezes. He’s hearing loud movements and…a Seinfeld rerun playing?

For a split second, the thought that someone broke in crosses his tired mind. His dumb ass quickly remembers the house has an extensive alarm system so the noise must be from you.

You being his long time best friend that randomly checks on the house when he’s gone. Other than his parents and Jared, you’re the only one he trusts to do that. You’re one of the few he trusts in general actually.

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How high are Sorey’s high heels?

As you probably all know, Sorey wears high heels in armatus form.

#godbless

But how high are they, exactly? Let’s use the screenshot below as a reference.

Okay, who does also wear high heels in the series? Lailah.

Let’s compare them to each other, shall we?

So: Sorey wears high heels of similar height as Lailah.

But, how high Lailah’s heels are?

I’ve compared Lailah cosplay boots and high heels that are quite similar.

Guys. They are about 3 inches (7.5 cm).

Sorey fights hellions in 7.5cm high heels.