mereadyouread

Hello All (strangers and friends),

I am going to selfishly use you as a bank of people to discuss a few intimate questions with and hope our lack of knowing eachother will make it more honest/frank. I have been spending a lot of time lately thinking about the impact of first-loves and how that impact may linger and mold (or, at the very least, inform) every other relationship we have. I came across this intriguing paragraph by Klosterman (follow the link and it’s the first complete paragraph on that page and then it stops): http://books.google.com/books?id=G91UYp-6438C&lpg=PA232&dq=killing%20yourself%20to%20live%20%22we%20all%20have%20the%20potential%20to%20fall%20in%20love%22&pg=PA232#v=onepage&q&f=false I’ve tried to have this conversation with close friends, but find that it’s hard to have an honest conversation since we’re trying to protect each other’s feelings. So when I ask them if they think our definition of love is defined by a revisionist-construction of an individual, I inevitably get a response that says “well _____ this”  or “I think you look at ____ like this…” So I want to use you all, who cannot blur your answers with personal context, and ask this question: Do we truly love a template–one created in our own mind with perhaps just a foundation in an individual? Or is this a cynical viewpoint? One that says we don’t actually fall in love with people we meet after our first love, but rather fall in love with how much they fill the love as defined by our original love? Perhaps this is not the purpose of MRYR, but I’d love to hear what you think. And at the very least, think this article is worth a read. Happy Carnival,

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Hi all!

Here’s an article about a lawsuit against some law schools for inflating post-graduation hiring rates.  As a current law student, I can confirm that the job market is hellish and, from what I hear, schools have a lot to worry about because their reporting practices (which are very influenced by the U.S. News & World Report) are probably questionable, to say the least.  And not just at lower tier schools.  It’s an interesting and quick read.

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2012/02/law-schools-sued-for-lying-about-lawyering.html

MG

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