mens trench

Armistice Day

Armistice Day is commemorated every year on November 11 to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of World War I, which took effect at eleven o'clock in the morning — the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918. The date was declared a national holiday in many allied nations, and coincides with Remembrance Day and Veterans Day.

4

C’était la Guerre des Tranchées / It Was the War of the Trenches (1993) is a French ‘comic’ book written and illustrated by Jacques Tardi and dedicated to his grandfather who fought ‘in the trenches’ (a French euphemism to talk about the First World War).
The book is an accurate depiction of the life on both sides of the Western Front, recounted through a multitude of mainly French soldiers’ letters, and is well known for its graphic representation of WW1.

“They’re shooting men… This is normal, because it’s the war of the trenches which has been going on for three years now…
…the most surprising is that there are still traces of life left in these holes, with all so many shells they’re dropping on so little ground.

Those men have dug trenches, made shelters in the earth and learned to live in the mud like rats. These ones are French.
Facing them, it’s the same thing, but the trenches are better organized because they are German. The French say ‘les Boches’ when talking about their enemies, out of contempt, hatred, or perhaps stupidity, because this is indeed what this is about about when one is talking about war.”

Fun Fact: Actually more of a creepy fact than a fun fact. J.R.R. Tolkien served in in the trenches with the British army during WWI. He saw combat in France. In that war, men lived for years in networks of these trenches. During artillery barrages, the shells would explode in the network of trenches buying men under dirt and mud. Then, later, it would rain and the dead faces could be seen in these murky pools of shell craters and rainwater. Pale, and eerily glowing a phosphorescent green. When Tolkien wrote the “Lord of the Rings” he remembered the dead faces when he wrote of the Deadmarshes in The Two Towers.