men ships and the sea

The ropes know

Here I am again… analysing 1x05′s first scene, again… sorry not sorry.

I said that I didn’t finish analyzing it cause the more I see it the more subtle things I find.

I think someone posted here before about the sounds we hear in this scene. Apart from Blint’s conversation, we only hear the men on the crew working in the ship, the sound of the sea, posibly some birds, and the fucking ropes getting tense…

From my point of view, the ropes are a “key object(concept)” in the composition of this scene and in it’s perception.

This is going to be another long ride… so make yourself comortable…

Keep reading

5

So like, me and @mama-sally have made a hobby of making up AUs… Like a new one every day and then I draw some scribbles of em.

Here we have the Pirate!AU, where Judy joins Captain Savage’s motley crew of miscreants on a treasure hunt in the magical Devil’s Basin after Nick and Gideon fish her out of the ocean. 

Of course there’s also some stuff like Gideon and Nick’s childhood as slaves on a sugar plantation, and Judy needing to go by Jude to avoid the unsavory aspects of being the only woman on a ship full of men at sea.

Its all fun and games until someone (Gideon) loses an eye. Now we just gotta choose who gets the peg leg.

2

May 31st 1916: Battle of Jutland

On this day in 1916, the largest naval battle of the First World War was fought. The conflict occurred off Denmark’s North Sea coast, with Britain and Germany as the belligerent parties. While there had been relatively little naval engagement during the war, German Admiral Reinhardt von Scheer had decided in 1916 to break the British blockade of the German coast by luring British ships out of their naval bases. British Admiral John Jellicoe responded to the provocation, and in late May the two sides faced each other off the Jutland peninsula. The British forces were able to use fading daylight to cut the Germans from their home base and strike their vessels, leading to German retreat. Despite this success, the British suffered far greater losses in men and ships than the Germans - losing over 6,000 men and 14 ships to Germany’s over 2,500 men and 11 ships. Thus, while Britain retained control of the North Sea, neither side could claim an overall victory. The Battle of Jutland did, however, play a key strategic role in furthering the Allied cause, as it weakened German naval capabilities.

100 years ago today

anonymous asked:

NAC: Mod, if you could genderbend one character, who would you choose?

I would probably have to choose Hook. Not to say that there’s anything wrong with Hook being a guy, but I can’t help thinking of how cool it would have been if they had chosen to have Hook portrayed by a woman. 

Imagine it: Hook and Milah as two ladies making up a completely badass pirate power couple. The men on the ship fear them, and respect them, and they travel across the seas together looking for everything and nothing all at once. The story could have gone somewhat the same, but perhaps the real reason Milah hated life with Rumpelstiltskin so much could have been that she was never in love with him because she never wanted to marry a man in the first place, but she grew up according to her parents’, and society’s plans. 

Then along comes this cocky, confident young woman in leather everything and far too much eyeliner who promises Milah the adventure of a lifetime and the love she’s always dreamed of but could never have. How can she say no? She doesn’t want to, but she’s got a man and child - a child she wished she could have raised alone - at home. It’s so right but so wrong, and she knows that it is better for all of them if she goes.

Fast forward to Emma Swan meeting this smug young woman who reminds her of the kind of people one of her foster mothers had told her to stay away from but Emma had never listened. Leaving her up on that beanstalk gives Emma Swan a nemesis in the vengeful pirate, but Hook can’t quite bring herself to hate the saviour as much as she wants to and so the story plays out the way we have seen - the struggle, the chase, and the journey to a happy ending. 

And a female Hook/Belle friendship would be so amazing. Hook watches Belle struggling to hold herself together after the aftermath of her relationship’s end, and is there for Belle to offer words of encouragement. And she’d ensure Belle that she made the right decision in ending a dangerous relationship, that she is a strong person, that she is a good person. And Belle would ask about Milah, and what really happened, and so a new friendship begins.

Try and tell me that that doesn’t sound even a little bit awesome. 

Denizens of the deep have enthralled humans for centuries. Greek myths pitted Hercules and Perseus against the serpentine sea monster Cetus. A 13th-century Icelandic saga told of the sea beast Hafgufa, which swallowed men and ships alike. In 1830, Alfred Lord Tennyson penned a sonnet about the kraken, a legendary Scandinavian sea creature so charismatic that 150 years later Hollywood decided to unleash it on ancient Greece in Clash of the Titans.

These marine monsters may have a basis in fact. Giant squid may not reach the size of the gigantic kraken, which was sometimes depicted demolishing boats with its massive tentacles, but they are formidable and impressive animals. Imagine a sighting centuries ago: it would certainly have been exceptional fodder for any seafarer’s stories. And as those tales were shared, the creature likely grew with each retelling, eventually reaching titanic proportions. 

In this image, one can see how a “sea serpent” sighting may have been inspired by a breaching of a giant squid. (Sea serpent illustration: Erik Pontoppidan, 1752; giant squid illustration: Henry Lee, 1883.)

Read more about mythological mix-ups and watch the new episode of Shelf Life, The Voyage of the Giant Squid:

Denizens of the deep have enthralled humans for centuries. Greek myths pitted Hercules and Perseus against the serpentine sea monster Cetus. A 13th-century Icelandic saga told of the sea beast Hafgufa, which swallowed men and ships alike. In 1830, Alfred Lord Tennyson penned a sonnet about the kraken, a legendary Scandinavian sea creature so charismatic that 150 years later Hollywood decided to unleash it on ancient Greece in Clash of the Titans.

These marine monsters may have a basis in fact. Giant squid may not reach the size of the gigantic kraken, which was sometimes depicted demolishing boats with its massive tentacles, but they are formidable and impressive animals. The largest giant squid are thought to measure more than 40 feet from the tips of their tentacles to the end of their mantle, or body. That’s about the length of a school bus.

Learn more about this topic, and watch newest episode of Shelf Life: