mehgan murphy

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Clouded leopard cubs on 4/21/09 by Smithsonian’s National Zoo
Via Flickr:
The clouded leopards born at the National Zoo’s Conservation and Research Center on March 24 have been moved out of the incubator into a holding area, which has a log so the cubs can begin to learn how to climb. For now, the cubs are mainly eating, sleeping, and growing, but they do play with each other a bit and move around after each feeding before they fall back to sleep. They are healthy and growing well. On April 23, the larger one weighed 33.8 ounces, and the smaller one weighed 29.6 ounces. Photo credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

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Crested Tinamou Chicks

A first for the Smithsonian’s National Zoo: four elegant crested tinamou chicks hatched recently at the Zoo’s Bird House.

With the arrival of the adult female just five months ago, Zoo staff was extremely pleased to have the tinamou chicks hatch on Oct. 30 and 31. In this species, the female lays the olive green eggs and then leaves them, while the male assumes all the responsibility for the offspring. To date he has done well as a first-time father.

The elegant crested tinamous are native to Chile and Argentina and prefer dry savannahs and open woodlands. They are hunted commonly for food and sport, but currently the population is stable. The chicks are on public display at the Zoo’s Bird House.

Photo Credit: Mehgan Murphy, National Zoo

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Clouded Leopard Cubs - 7-weeks-old by Smithsonian’s National Zoo
Via Flickr:
The seven-week-old clouded leopard cubs born at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo’s Conservation and Research Center (CRC) are now eating solid food in addition to formula. Their diet now includes 8 grams of cooked chopped chicken, three times per day. The cubs are growing at a steady and healthy rate—the larger cub weighs 3 lb. and 3.5 oz. and the smaller cub weighs 2 lb. and 12 oz. Additionally, the cubs now ‘chuff’, which can be described as a puffing sound and is considered a sign of recognition. The length of their play sessions has increased and they interact more with their caregivers. Photo credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo