medium-golden-brown

2

Chocolate Curry Buns - Black Butler

So, this is one of the most requested recipes, and also one that has taken me the most time to figure out.  If you’re looking for a quicker, more authentically Japanese curry bun, replace the curry roux and filling with a packet of instant curry and follow the instructions on a package.  This recipe is a “high class”, very British way of looking at the curry bun, with attention paid to how Sebastian cooked his in the show.  Notice the atypical additions of black pepper and red wine, frying the bun instead of baking, and, most importantly, the chocolate.  In short, his is simply one hell of a curry bun recipe.

Ingredients:

  • Curry roux:
  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • ⅓ cup flour
  • 2 tbsp.. garam masala
  • 1-2 tsp freshly ground black pepper (depending on how spicy you want it)
  • 1 tbs. tomato paste
  • 1 tbs. Worcestershire sauce
  • Dough:
  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. dry yeast
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. skim milk powder
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • Filling: 
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • 1 small onion, sliced thin
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • ½ pound beef chuck roast, cubed, or stew meat
  • ¼ cup red wine (substitute 1/8 cup balsamic vinegar and 1/8 cup all-natural grape juice if you can’t get wine)
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 medium pre-cooked yukon gold potato
  • 1 tbsp. apple puree or apple sauce
  • 1 cardamom pod
  • 1 whole star anise pod
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ⅓ cup peas (optional)
  • Half of a bar of dark chocolate

Instructions:

  1. First, we’re going to start with the roux. Melt the butter over medium low heat. 
  2. Add the flour and whisk the butter and flour together in the pan until the mixture turns a golden brown.
  3. Add the garam masala and black pepper and stir to combine, then add the tomato paste and Worcestershire sauce and combine. Continue to cook until it becomes thick and paste-like. Remove from heat and set aside until the meat and veggies are ready.
  4. Combine yeast, water, and sugar in a bowl. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes, until foamy.
  5. Add the rest of the dough ingredients and knead for 8-10 minutes.
  6. Cover with a dish towel and allow dough to rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 to 1½ hours.  If it’s cool in the kitchen, I frequently turn on a stove top burner, and let the dough sit on the counter near it to help the rising process.
  7. Divide the dough into 8 equal portions. Let rest for 10 minutes (make sure not to let them dry out, cover them with a damp paper towel or two).
  8. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in your pan.  Pat the beef down with a paper towel to remove any excess moisture, sprinkle some salt and pepper on the meat, and dust with a bit of flour.  Once the pan is hot, add your meat, cooking for about 6-7 minutes on each side, or until nice and brown.  Then, put the meat into a bowl and set aside.
  9. Heat oil in a pan, and saute onion and garlic.  While sauteing, grind the cardamom and anise.
  10. Add the browned beef, wine, water, carrots, potatoes, salt, apple puree, cardamom, anise, and bay leaf, and then bring to a boil over high heat. 
  11. Turn the heat down to medium low and simmer partially covered until the carrots are tender (about 45 minutes).
  12. Add in the curry roux that you set aside in step 3 and the chocolate, and stir until the roux and liquid in the pan combine and thicken into a nice curry sauce.  Set aside to cool, and don’t forget to remove the bay leaf.
  13. Dust your hands with flour!  Flatten the dough balls into a round disc, place a spoonful of filling in the middle, and wrap wrap the edges around the filling. Gently shape each dough ball into a bun.
  14. In a frying pan, heat about an inch of oil (vegetable, canola, or sunflower oil are preferred). Add the buns, however many will fit in your pan at a time. Fry them on medium/low until golden brown, turning over to cook each side.
  15. Let them cool, then present to the judges.  Or your friends.  Or just eat them yourself.

Tofu scramble with sweet potato hash browns.

So delicious and so simple. Two very important criteria for me when deciding what to cook. One, because, well, delicious food is important if I actually expect to eat anything (lol) and two, if it’s not simple I lose interest pretty quickly. I wouldn’t say I’m lazy but rather busy. I’m always running around doing several different things so instead of trying to find more time to cook (and making myself crazy) I find things to make that can fit into the time I already have available (which isn’t much lately). Feel me? Good.

Sweet Potato Hash Browns

1 large (or 2 medium) sweet potatoes, peeled and grated
¼ cup gluten free flour
2 tbsp. refined coconut oil (plus more for cooking)
½ tsp. salt

Wash and peel the sweet potatoes then shred them and using a colander, rinse the potato shreds until the water runs mostly clear. Squeeze the rinsed potatoes to remove excess water. I like to transfer them to paper towels to remove more water. Transfer potatoes to a medium sized bowl. Add flour, oil and salt and mix until incorporated.

Add 1-2 tablespoons of coconut oil to a skillet on medium heat. Measure ¼ cup sweet potato shreds into the pan and use a spatula to flatten them. Cook for about 3 minutes per side or until golden to medium brown and crispy. Transfer cooked hash browns to a plate lined with paper towels to soak up any excess oil.

Enchanted Sugar Waxing Tutorial

In honor of the impending holidays here in the states, we wanted to provide for you guys an alternative to shaving that has some extremely alluring pulls – sugar waxing. Some stunning factors of sugar waxing is as follows: its last 3 to 4 weeks which is worlds longer than traditional shaving, sugar wax itself only adheres to your hair as opposed to traditional wax used in salons that adheres to the skin thus making sugar waxing much more forgiving for people with a low pain tolerance. We feel obligated to tell you the cons just in case you’re on the fence; sugar waxing is pretty time consuming but the process becomes easier and faster with each use. We’d also like to make note that sugar waxing at home has a reputation for never quite working out the way you want it too. We’ve all seen it I’m sure, pretty close to the standard recipe for disaster: 2 cups of granulated, white sugar, ¼ cup of lemon juice, ¼ cup of water, heat in a sauce pan at medium-high heat ‘til golden brown and wait of the mess to ensue. Whether we’ve attempted this in the mystical hard wax method (kneading into a ball and rolling onto skin to see the hair magically disappear,) or the soft wax method which is pretty much traditional to the core (smear onto skin with a popsicle stick, put strip of cotton onto of wax, rub, and rip to remove hair,) trust us when we say it just usually doesn’t work. We haven’t even scratched the surface of how to make a working hard sugar wax that really removes all of our hair so we’re only vouching for this recipe as a soft wax but once you have an effective foundation, we encourage experimentation.  

The beauty of this method is that it allows for a gorgeous amount of wiggle room, meaning it you don’t get it right or you don’t have the exact ingredients, you’ll still be perfectly fine but there are some things we want to note prior to getting into the actual sugar wax recipe.

  • • Sugar wax only adheres to the hair so for the smoothest hair removal, you’re going to need to have at least 1/6 inch of hair growth, two weeks of hair growth if you’re a regular shaver, four weeks of hair growth if you’re a regular waxer.
  • • To prevent ingrown hairs and infection, make sure to not shave in between waxes.
  • • The first time you sugar wax, you’ll have some stray hair, so it does help to have tweezers on hand.
  • • When cutting strips to use while waxing, you can purchase some organic cotton waxing strips or you can use something at home. Most tutorials on this suggest an old t-shirt, we recommend against that, as t-shirts are generally stretchy. You’ll want to look for something with little to no give, a fabric like linen or muslin. We recommend an old sheet, we actually use a ribbon, our first time doing this, we were scrambling for a something as the circle scarf that we cut up was just too stretchy, we came to a resolve by pulling out a long, red ribbon from our arts and crafts closet, we chopped it up and it was prefect; we’ve been using that ribbon ever since. Another beautiful thing is you just have to drop these into a basin of warm water, wait for the wax to dissolve, drain, and allow for the strips to dry.
  • • Just as the strips are a breeze to clean, sugar waxing as a whole is a cinch because water easily dissolves sugar, so anywhere you make a mess all you have to do is take a rag dampened with warm water and wipe it down. Same goes with any of your utensils used, just soak in warm water to clean.
  • • The recipe that we present you with should be enough your underarms twice, your bikini area and your underarms, your actual arms, both of your legs, you can double it if you’re going full body, no worries at all but we do recommend that if you’re new to waxing, just using the recipe below because you might not be into it and it is a bummer wasting ingredients.
  • • Sugar is known to cause yeast infections but you can use this wax on the bikini area, just take care to not get it on any of your sensitive areas and you should be good to go. (i.e. bikini wax, not recommended for a Brazilian.)

Our enchanted sugar wax recipe:

1 cup of granulated, white sugar

¼ cup of Apple Cider Vinegar

1 tablespoon of water

Again this recipe has a lot of flexibility. If you don’t have white sugar, you can you brown if you’d like, should you use brown, you’re going to have to pay a bit more attention to the overall consistency as the color will be less of an indicator. If you don’t ACV, you can substitute for a different acid such as lime or lemon juice and you can use bottled, no need for fresh if it’s not as readily available for you. You can experiment with adding honey if you’re non-vegan for some more anti-septic properties, whatever you’d like really.

You’ll want to add all of your ingredients to a medium saucepan and mix (we recommend mixing with a wooden spoon). Once you mix those you can go ahead and sit your mixing utensil aside until the cooking process is over. This is crucial because you don’t want crystallization to take place.

Put the saucepan over a medium flame and allow for the sugar to melt and for the water to evaporate (this is why the usual ¼ cup of water is absolute overkill in the recipe.) Once everything melts together (around 3-4 minute on a medium flame,) the mixture with begin to bubble, this is perfect. You’ll want to take the handle of the saucepan and swirl the mixture around bit every 2 minutes or so; this will be your form mixing throughout the cooking process. You’ll want to keep this mixture going on the heat until it’s golden, just slightly lighter than the color of regular store-brand honey. As you swirl the pot, the mixture should be thick, like half the thickness of molasses and you’re set! This process should take around 30 minutes. If you feel like the mixture is getting worked a bit too quickly, just turn down the stove, if the process is a bit too slow for you, keep a vigilant eye and turn up the heat.

Once the sugar is golden, turn off the heat, allow the mixture to sit in the pan for a few minutes (around 3,) then use your spoon to transfer the mixture to a heat-proof container. At this point the mixture is extremely so make sure to let it cool for at least 15 minutes. This is of the utmost importance that you let the mixture cool for 15 minutes and also that you do a test swatch after the 15 minutes to make sure that the wax is comfortable for you because you definitely don’t want to burn your skin.

While the wax is cooling, get out your strips (again use any fabric that doesn’t have too much stretch and cut to around 2” by 1” strips,) you’ll want to make sure to that you’re waxing clean, dry areas.  We use the slightest bit of tapioca starch to absorb any additional moisture on the skin, you can use baking soda, baby powder, cornstarch, whatever you’d like and have on hand or you can omit this step entirely. Lastly, you’ll want something to apply the wax with (we use popsicle sticks.)  

Once your wax has cooled significantly and you have everything else prepared; just hold your skin taut and apply the wax against the hair growth, put one of your waxing strips over the wax and rub the area (the friction will create warm and ensure that the strip is complete connected to the wax, i.e. hair,) then just pull the strip off with the hair growth.

Continue this process until the hair is removed to your liking. Make sure to exfoliate regularly to prevent ingrown hairs and improve the texture of your skin overall, here’s a post on that: Exfoliate

After waxing, we always follow up with a shower. Another plus of sugar waxing is that you don’t have to wait to take warm showers, swim, workout, etc. like regular waxing. Post shower, make sure to use one of your favorite moisturizers, we use our Leighis Body Butter which is stunning for the skin.

Here’s a master post on shaving: Major Key Alert: The Perfect Shave.

If you have any questions at all, just send us an ask!

We’re sending you so much love and so much light,

Curly Leighis

chaoticsongs  asked:

Hi! I'm working on a high fantasy series and the world is based on Turkey/Lebanon/Iran. What I'm wondering is if it would be offensive to have a world like that and not include Arabs or Muslims. I'm not trying to make it seem like they're being excluded from the culture - everything is rather loosely based on those countries (mostly food, landscape, climate etc.) but real world religions and ethnicities aren't the same - I also worry that having Muslim characters doing magic would be offensive.

POC Exclusion from Culture/Land 

Biological Reasons for PoC in Secondary Fantasy

I offered to help Yasmin with this, because I noticed your question relied on anthro-biological principles and I have more experience with those than she does

So, if you’re working in a world based on Turkey/Lebanon/Iran, weather and latitude included? You can’t remove Arabs. You’re right that Muslims shouldn’t use magic, but you should have Arabs without being Muslim.

Skin colour serves a very important biological purpose: it is an adaptation to amounts and harshness of sunlight received. It is why Northerners are pale and people who live in the tropics have such dark skin. They needed that skin colour in order to survive where they are.

The golden medium brown of Arab skin is their protection from the sun. Since you have flat out admitted to using the climate and food, it would be biologically impossible for anybody but Arabs to populate your world. White people would burn and develop a whole host of illnesses at a higher rate because their skin is not made for the environment. Evolution works in such a way that adaptations that encourage the survival of the species are passed on, which means darker skin colour would most certainly be one of those adaptations. It would prevent vitamin D poisoning, heat stroke, and cancer, making anybody with darker skin more likely to thrive.

Not to mention if they spend any time outside at all, tanning would happen and they would be darker anyway.

So, no, you shouldn’t do this, unless you want to be both racist and scientifically inaccurate. It doesn’t matter if you’ve changed the ethnic groups and religions— just on the basic biological concept that darker skin= healthier in sunnier areas, you will have Arabs.

~Mod Lesya

syfygeek13  asked:

hello! do you have any references or advice for describing hair? the color, texture, thickness, etc.?

Hi!

Colors:

Red- 

Red- your usual, natural shade (even if it’s dyed, just looks natural) ‘redhead’

Fire-engine red- bright red; usually achieved through dyeing

‘Ginger’- lighter red hair with orange or gold tones

Orange- lighter red hair that appears orange

Strawberry blond(e)- a shade with red or brown undertones.

Blond(e)- (hey, while we’re on the topic, blonde and blond are one of the few English feminine/masculine words. Blonde is supposed to be used for someone who identifies as female, blond for male. I honestly don’t know what would happen in the case of a non-binary but in another language it’d probably just go to the male ‘blond’ because male tends to be the default. Anyone have more information on this)

Light blond(e), medium blond(e), dark blond(e)

Platinum- a very light blond(e) color that may even appear white in certain lighting. This term could refer to bleached or natural hair. The natural would be common in children and Northern Europeans.

Dirty-blond(e) and brown hair mixed, often brown at the roots.

Honey- caramel brown undertones, maybe even a hint of red. Darker than strawberry.

Ash- ashen or gray undertones, usually a pretty light shade

Yellow-blond(e)- often achieved through dyeing

Sandy- a mix of blond(e), brown, and gray tones

Bleached- light shade; term is used to refer to unnatural hair

Brown-blond(e)- a mixture of brown and blond(e) tones.

Brunet(te)- (brunet is masculine, brunette is feminine)

light brown, medium brown, dark brown

Chestnut brown- a medium to dark tone

Golden brown- a light shade with gold tones

Chocolate brown- a medium shade that could be light or dark

Walnut brown- a lighter medium brown

Russet brown- dark brown with red, auburn, or gold highlights

Auburn- red-brown

Raven- dark brown, almost/if not black

Black- the most common hair color in the world

Jet-black- black hair

Gray- when the hair begins to lose pigments, it will start to turn gray. The roots are affected first, where the hair grows from, and unless dyed, over time the whole head will become gray. (Not to be confused with hair that just has gray tones)

“Salt and pepper”- a term coined for people with darker or black hair. When their hair starts to lose pigments and begins to go gray or white, some of their hair will be white/gray, while the rest is dark, giving it the ‘salt and pepper’ look.

White- when the hair begins to lose pigments, it will start to turn white. The roots are affected first, where the hair grows from, and unless dyed, over time the whole head will become white.

Not to be confused with hair that appears white because of lighting such as very light blond(e) or white-blond(e) hair.

Also, people with low amounts of melanin (albinism) or other special cases could also end up with white hair.

Dyed/highlighted/”unnatural” hair-

Unnatural hair can be pretty much any color(s) there’s dye for. Blue, pink, green, as well as any natural color, of course, the possibilities are endless!

Hair types:

Straight- strongest hair type that reflects light well which can give it a glossy appearance. Depending on the texture and thickness, it may be difficult to get this hair to hold a curl without the use of a lot of chemicals (hair spray, a treatment, etc.).

Wavy- light ‘s’ shaped curls. Can usually straighten or curl fairly easily. May frizz fairly easily.

Curly- hair that is usually curly down the entire length of the hair shaft. This hair type often faces frizz and dryness. 

Kinky/Coiled- tightest curls, often with an ‘s’ or ‘z’ shape. The most fragile of the hair types. Curl definition, shrinkage, and dryness are issues faced by people of this hair type.

Dreads- matted, thin braids often formed through the ‘neglect method’.

Bald- no hair, could be a result of age or medical problems

Buzzed- a shaved head

Texture:

Fine- the thinnest, finest texture. Often found in children. The hair is delicate and breaks easily. Cannot hold a lot of product without looking greasy or unhealthy. Does not hold style well. Soft, smooth to the touch.

Thin- a bit thicker than fine, but still a very thin, delicate texture. Often found in children. The hair is delicate and breaks easily. Cannot hold a lot of product without looking greasy or unhealthy. Does not hold style well. Soft, smooth to the touch.

Medium- hair of average texture. Not broken as easily. Holds styles pretty well. Covers the scalp well. Usually does not have too many issues with frizz or dryness if properly cared for and will get oily after a few days without wash.

Thick- thick, full hair that styles well and holds its own shape well. Ex: may be able to stay in a braid without the use of a hair band. Can tolerate high amounts of heat, dyes, and chemicals without dying out as easy.

Coarse- the thickest kind of hair that styles well and holds its own shape well. Ex: may be able to stay in a braid without the use of a hair band. Can tolerate high amounts of heat, dyes, and chemicals without dying out as easy. May get a bit out control if not properly cared for because of the extremely thick texture.

Hair styles:

Twist and pin up-dos.

Latest hair styles.

Hair styles for men and women.

I really hope this can help you, or anyone else who gets stuck on describing hair! :D

3

The Dumpling’s The Thing…
Submitted to MasterChef by thewayweate

Dumplings, may the one food loved the world over. While many cultures stake a claim to the origin of the dumpling (writing can be found over 1500 years old in both Roman-era Italy and Han Dynasty China heralding the joy of dumpling) the culinarians of today could care less. Personally, i’d much rather pursue the next dumpling than debate it’s origins. With a multitude of glutenous deliciousness to choose from, including dumplings from Korea, China, Georgia and a multitude of other nations, diners would be hard pressed to find a cuisine in the world that doesn’t serve a signature dumpling.

If these wonderful treasures wrapped in small parcels are new to you, perhaps one of the finest and most delicious examples available are the wonderful dumplings that are offered in Eastern European and Russian culture. While the recipes provided below by no means attempt to convey authenticity, they are quite celebratory of the spirit, flavor and history of a captivating part of the world, and their enchanting cuisine.


Bleu Cheese Pierogi, Pelmeni in Dressing & Free Form Varenyky

Prepare an all-purpose dumpling dough.

½ Cup Whole Milk
½ Cup Water
1 Large Egg
1 Tablespoon Vegetable Oil
Pinch of Salt
3 Cups All-Purpose Flour

In a large non-reactive bowl, whisk the egg, water, milk, Oil and salt together.
Add the Flour, ½ cup at a time, incorporating with a wooden paddle.

Once the dough has formed and is no longer sticking to the sides of the bowl, remove the dough and place on a floured work surface. Knead the dough for 5 full minutes, adding flour as necessary. Do not add more than ½ cup of flour or the dough will become too tough.

Roll the dough into a large ball and flour liberally, Place in a clean, non-reactive bowl, and cover with a towel. Let the dough rest at room temperature for ½ - 1 Hour.

To make all three dumplings, divide dough into thirds.

Bleu Cheese Piergoi

3 Medium sized potatoes
¼ Cup Crumbled Bleu Cheese
½ Large Yellow Onion
1 Teaspoon Yellow Mustard
2 Tablespoons Unsalted Butter
1/8 Teaspoon Table Salt
1/8 Teaspoon Fresh Ground Black Pepper
2-4 Cups Vegetable Oil
½ Cup Sour Cream

Peel and chop potatoes into 4-6 pieces each. Place the potatoes in a saucepan and cover with 1 inch of cold water. Set pan over medium high heat to boil. Once boiling reduce to medium low and simmer potatoes for 15 minutes. When tender drain potatoes in a colander and allow them to completely drain out. Meanwhile, Chop ½ onion very fine and add it to a saute pan with the butter set over medium heat, turning  the onions frequently. Caramelize onions slowly for about 15 minutes until deep golden brown, but don’t allow them to burn. Reduce flame to low if necessary. Remove from flame and allow to cool for 5 minutes.

Add cooled onion and butter mixture and potatoes to a metal bowl and mash them. Add salt, pepper and mustard and combine well. Add Bleu Cheese and fold in with a spatula. Set mixture aside.

Using 1/3 of the All-Purpose Dough, knead dough slightly over heavily floured surface. Roll dough into a rope and cut off 1 inch sections using a heavy knife. Roll each section into a disc using a straight or french rolling pin. Stack the discs on top of each other, adding flour in between each layer.

Using 1 disc at a time, place 1 heaping teaspoon of the potato mixture on a disc. fold the disc over into a half-moon shape and pinch well. Crimp edges using a fork. Repeat for all the remaining disc, placing the pierogi on a floured plate.

In a deep frying pan, add about 1 inch of Vegetable oil. Heat over medium heat to 350 Degrees. Fry the pierogi in batches and let them drain over absorbent paper. Serve the Pierogi warm with a side dish of sour cream.

Pelmeni in Dressing

1 Large Yellow Onion
3 Garlic Cloves, Peeled
1 Pound Ground Beef
2 Dill Pickles
1 Teaspoon Yellow Mustard
1 Teaspoon Soy Sauce
½ Teaspoon Table Salt
½ Teaspoon Fresh Ground Black Pepper
½ Cup Sour Cream
1 Tablespoon White Vinegar
1 Tablespoon Fresh Dill, Finely Minced

Peel and coarsely chop onion and add to the work bowl of a food processor, Coarsely chop the pickles and add them with the garlic to the work bowl. pulverize the onion with the garlic and pickles until very finely chopped. add the mixture to a bowl. Add Mustard, Soy Sauce, Salt, and pepper to bowl and combine well.

Using 1/3 of the All-Purpose Dough, knead dough slightly over heavily floured surface. Roll dough into a rope and cut off 1 inch sections using a heavy knife. Roll each section into a disc using a straight or french rolling pin. Stack the discs on top of each other, adding flour in between each layer.

Using 1 disc at a time, place 1 heaping teaspoon of the Beef mixture on a disc. fold the disc over into a half-moon shape and pinch well. Fold the two points of the moon over each other and press, making a purse shape. Repeat for all the remaining disc, placing the Pelmeni on a floured plate.

Heat 2 quarts of salted water over a very high flame, and bring to a boil. Reduce water to simmering and add the pelmeni. Pelmeni will need about 6-8 Minutes to cook and is generally “done” when floating. Remove a single pelmeni from the water and check inside that the meat is cooked.

Remove remaining pelmeni with a slotted spoon and allow them to drain well in a colander.
Meanwhile prepare the dressing in a large, non-reactive bowl by adding the sour cream, vinegar and dill. Combine well. Add the drained pelmeni and coat them well, but carefully in the sauce, using a rubber spatula. Serve the Pelmeni in the sauce, about 4-5 for each person, and add more dill as garnish if desired.

Free Form Varenyky

1 Large Yellow Onion (divided in half)
2 Garlic Cloves, Peeled
½ Pound Ground Beef
1 Dill Pickles
¼ Teaspoon Yellow Mustard
¼ Teaspoon Table Salt
¼ Teaspoon Fresh Ground Black Pepper
½ Cup Medium Grain Rice
6 Medium Sized White Mushrooms
½ Large Yellow Onion
2 Tablespoons Unsalted Butter
6-8 Large Iceberg Lettuce Leaves, Minced Fine
1 ½ Cups Water
1 Tablespoon Soy Sauce


Peel and coarsely chop ½ of the onion and add to the work bowl of a food processor, Coarsely chop the pickle and add it with the garlic to the work bowl. pulverize the onion with the garlic and pickles until very finely chopped. add the mixture to a bowl. Add Mustard, Salt, and pepper to bowl and combine well. Set mixture aside.

Chop the mushroom very finely and set aside. Chop ½ onion very fine and add it to a saute pan with the butter set over medium heat, turning  the onions frequently. Caramelize onions slowly for about 10 minutes until medium golden brown, but don’t allow them to burn. Reduce flame to low if necessary. To this mixture add the mushrooms and allow them to cook down, about another 10 minutes. Add minced lettuce leaves to mixture and allow to wilt. Add balsamic vinegar and soy sauce and stir all the ingredients well.

Add the rice to the mixture and coat the grains well. Turning frequently for about 2 minutes. Add the water to the mixture, ½ cup at a time, allowing the water to absorb between each addition. Turn frequently. After all water has been incorporated. Set aside to cool for five minutes then add the onion mixture to the rice mixture.

Using 1/3 of the All-Purpose Dough, knead dough slightly over heavily floured surface. Roll dough into a rope and cut off 1 inch sections using a heavy knife. Roll each section into a disc using a straight or french rolling pin. Stack the discs on top of each other, adding flour in between each layer.

Using 1 disc at a time, place 1 heaping teaspoon of the Beef/Onion mixture on a disc.
Using your fingers first bring up two points of the disc together over the mixture, then the opposite two points, creating four points of the disc to meet over the mixture inside. Pinch together and twist to create a purse shape with a sealed top. Repeat for all the remaining disc, placing the Varenyky on a floured plate.

Heat 2 quarts of salted water over a very high flame, and bring to a boil. Reduce water to simmering and add the Varenyky. Varenyky will need about 6-8 Minutes to cook and is generally “done” when floating. Remove a single Varenyky from the water and check inside that the meat is cooked.

Remove remaining Varenyky with a slotted spoon and allow them to drain well in a colander.
Serve the Varenyky cooled to warm, about 4-5 for each person, and add more dill as garnish if desired.

Tarte - Rainforest of the sea palette

So as you would have seen from my post below, I got this little beauty for Christmas and I said I would do a little review for you all!

I’m a big fan of the tarte products I have tried in the past (foundation, mascara, their face brush, bronzer) but their goodies can be hard to get your hands on from the UK or cost a small fortune on the shipping, especially if it’s just for one or two items but I know you can buy their products from sites like QVC where you can get bundle deals without the high shipping costs – if you know of any other sites, help a girl out! I know that santa ( AKA my mum and dad) ordered this from America.

So this palette is stunning, the packaging was so pretty, it is circular shape which is easy to hold and has a cute little design on it. Inside the palette, there are 8 shades - mostly neutral tones with some warmer, some cooler-toned shades. For me, these colours suit exactly what I look for in a palette, I tend to stick to brown and gold shades so I was in love right away. These eyeshadows are really creamy and I found them so easy to blend into one another, tarte describe them as “cream powder” eyeshadows which I would agree with.

The shades are follows:

Seashell - A light-medium, pinky-peach shade with some warm undertones

Wave – A light to medium grey taupe with subtle, cooler undertones

Abyss – A brown with warm undertones and a slight shimmer

Reef - A medium, bronze shade with warm undertones and a gorgeous pear shimmery finish - One of my favourites

Starfish – A light-medium, golden brown with warm undertones with a shimmery finish - One of my favourites

Cove - A light-medium beige shade with warm undertones

Sand – A light almost yellow toned shade with warm undertones

Mermaid – A medium goldy shade with brown undertones and again, that shimmery finish – One of my favourites

The eyeshadows are easy to blend and build up, I find the lighter shades are excellent for using as transitions shade to get that seamless, blended look we all want. I’ve been using the palette with an old Avon eye primer I found from a wee while ago and this just helps keep the shadows in place, makes the colours pop and of course, keep it looking good all night.  

All in all, a really nice palette and the shades suit me to a T. Worth the money? I’d say so considering there are 8 different shades to choose from and plus, the packaging is just gorgeous.

I’m going to look to do some different looks using this palette to show you all so keep an eye out for these! I’m going to dedicate more time to my blog because recently, I feel like I haven’t been doing as many product reviews and looks as I would like but thank you for anyone who takes the time out to follow and read my posts, I really do appreciate it!

If you know any Tarte stockists in the UK, let me know and if you’ve tried this palette, what’s your thoughts?

Are there any Tarte products out there I’m missing out on and I should buy?! Let me know!

Natalie :) xoxox

Instagram: NatalieGangel

10

Vans Girls: Cooking Up Coolness with A Cozy Kitchen 

Ah, the holidays. A time to bundle up in your coziest sweater and Sk8-Hi’s, hang out with the family, and fill up on all the yummiest sweets and treats of the season. Our girl, Adrianna of A Cozy Kitchen knows what’s up, and has filled the pages of her latest cook book, The Year of Cozy with easy recipes for delectable carby goodness. We asked Adrianna to share one of her favorite dishes to bring to Friendsgiving, which is just as easy to make as it is hard to only have one. Here’s her easy recipe for Flaky, Buttery Buttermilk Biscuits…

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Homemade pancakes with a Alpro vanilla dessert pot, all natural peanut butter and golden syrup.

Pancake Ingredients-
2 1/2 cups of all purpose flour,
2 tbsp sugar,
2 tbsp baking powder,
1 tbsp vegetable oil,
1 tsp salt,
2 1/2 non dairy milk (I used almond).

Method-
Mix all ingredients in a jug or bowl and pour onto a hot oiled pan on medium heat. Cook until golden brown on both sides, serve and decorate with your favourite toppings.

2

My Homemade Granola Recipe!

7 cups Rolled Oats, Uncooked (I use Bob’s Red Mill)

1 cup Sweetened  Coconut Flakes

1-2 cups of Pecans

½ cup Vegetable Oil

1 cup pure Maple Syrup*

1 tablespoon Vanilla Extract

1 tablespoon Cinnamon

2 cups of Raisins

*Pure maple syrup (as opposed to maple-flavored cane sugar syrup) makes a MUCH tastier granola. If you use “fake” syrup, you’ll have to use a lot more to get the same degree of sweetness; probably an additional ½ cup. 

In a very large bowl, combine the oats, coconut, and nuts. Mix well. In a separate bowl, whisk together the oil,  maple syrup, vanilla and cinnamon. Pour over the dry mixture in the bowl, stirring and tossing till everything is very well combined. 

Spread granola on 2 large lightly greased baking sheets; a half-sheet pan is ideal. Bake in a preheated 250°F oven for about 60 minutes, stirring the mixture with a heatproof spatula, every 15 minutes or so. You want to bring the granola at the edge in towards the middle, so it all browns evenly. And reverse the baking sheets in the oven (top to bottom, bottom to top) each time you stir.

When the granola is a light–to–medium golden brown, remove it from the oven and cool completely on the pans. Transfer the granola to a large bowl, and mix in the dried fruit. Store in a tightly closed container at room temperature. I use a Gallon size Zip Lock bag. 

**Since my electric oven burns hotter and my man doesn’t want his granola to well done, I only have to cook the granola for 50 minutes. Just play it by color.

***You can add in as many cups of different nuts, seeds, and dried fruits as you want. Basically, make this recipe your own. :)

Here you go toethefinishline! :)

8

Vanilla Almond & Chocolate Chunk Individual Cheesecakes

*Enough for 1 1/2 dozen

Ingredients for Crust

2-3 cups crushed graham crackers

5-6 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

Ingredients for Filling

2 8oz blocks of cream cheese, softened to room temperature

3 eggs at room temperature

½ cup sour cream

½ cup ricotta cheese

2 tsp vanilla

1 cup sugar

Zest of 1 small lemon

Ingredients for Topping

½ - ¾ cup almonds tossed in 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Chocolate chunks, finely chopped {I used Nestle Toll House brand}

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a muffin/cupcake tin with liners

In a bowl, combine graham cracker crumbs with melted butter until you get the consistency of wet sand

Take about ¾ of a large tbsp of the mixture and press in into the bottom of the cupcake liners

Bake crust until it is cooked through, about 10-13 minutes

In a standing mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or by hand), cream together the cream cheese and sugar.

Add the eggs and vanilla.

Incorporate the sour cream and ricotta.

Mix thoroughly. A few lumps are fine.

After crusts have baked and slightly cooled, using an ice cream scoop, divide batter among the cups. There will be extra batter to make another 6-8 cheesecakes

Bake cheesecakes for about 30-45 minutes or until the center is slightly jiggly and the edges are firm

Let cool completely before topping (because chocolate will melt)

Toast almonds in a dry pan over medium heat until golden brown. Immediately toss in vanilla extract

Chop together with chocolate chunks

Top cheesecakes once they are cooled

Enjoy!

anonymous asked:

Can you recommend some must have mac blushes?

  • Cubic (my favorite)
  • Lovecloud (basic warm pink)
  • Mocha (universal pink)
  • Style (peach pink glow)
  • Melba (soft coral)
  • Sunbasque (deep peach)
  • Peaches (peach)
  • Blushbaby (neutral pink)
  • Well Dressed (soft pink, must have for fair skin tones)
  • Gingerly (bronze, must have for medium skin tones)
  • Raizin (golden brown, must have for deep skin tones)

These are their basic blushes not the pro longwear or mineralize.

anonymous asked:

Signs as dif hair colors?

Aries: Auburn ( to match your fiery personality)

Taurus: A warm blonde color ( to match your tone of relaxation)

Gemini: White ( you’d look hot)

Cancer: A Redish brown ( idk. It would just look amazing)

Leo: Ombré, probably a dark brown on top and a lighter brown-blonde on the bottom (makes you look fierce )

Virgo: Dark brown, with golden blonde streaks (mature, yet sassy)

Libra: Light Blonde
( shiny in the sun)

Scorpio: Any Color

Sagittarius: Medium Golden Brown ( makes your eyes pop)

Capricorn: Hm. Dark dark brown ( makes your features soft)

Aquarius: pink ( one word: sassy)

Pisces: purple or blue ( it makes you look cute)