medicinal flowers

Made my first spell jar! I’ve been pretty emotionally unstable today (probably just going to be on my period soon) so for my spell jar the main thing was just having a better mood.
I added:
•Dirt from a place that makes me happy
•moonstone (promotes emotional stability)
•valerian root tea leaves (calmness)
•chamomile tea leaves (calmness)
•cinnamon stick bark (happiness)
And that is all. Really hoping this helps🙌🏻

Edible Magickal Flowers and Folk Lore

The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greeks and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking, medicine, and magick.

 Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little magickal whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbaceous, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising. Flower petals can be used in salads and as garnish for desserts, but they also inspire magickal creative uses as well. Use them to make floral spirit water for rituals, as a medicinal tea, or add to a healing spell or love potion….  the possibilities are endless.

 TIPS FOR SAFE AND TASTY DINING:

  •        Not all flowers are edible (those listed below are safe for consumption) - As lovely as eating flowers can be, some can also be a little … deadly, so only eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants. (Always refer to the botanical name when verifying whether a flower is safe to eat.)
  •       Just because a flower is edible doesn’t mean it will taste good. Some will be more to your liking than others – it’s all a matter of taste. Keep in mind that the stamen, pistil and sepal of some blossoms are bitter and can contain pollen that may detract from the true flavor of the flower. Consuming only the petals will further heighten the appeal factor.
  •       Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
  •       Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
  •      Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
  •      If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
  •     To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.


1, Allium
All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful.  Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible. Garlic is masculine in nature and associated with the planet Mars, the element fire and the sign Aries. It is sacred to Hecate and is a suitable offering to her left at a crossroads.  Garlic has antibiotic properties, but should not be used directly on wounds or in poultices or salves because it can be irritating to the skin and may inhibit blood clotting.

2. Angelica
Depending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor. Believed to have originated in Syria, angelica is now found just about everywhere. In ancient times it was used to ward off the plague and evil and as a cure for poison and… well, just about everything else. Angelica is associated with the angels Michael and Gabriel. It is aligned with the sun and the element of fire and sacred to Venus. Angelica tea is useful for colic, gas, indigestion, hepatitis, heartburn, nausea, ulcers and various other digestive ailments.

3. Anise Hyssop
Both flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor. Anise is one of the oldest known plants that were grown for both culinary and medicinal use. Anise is associated with the element of air, the God Apollo, the planets Mercury and Jupiter, and the astrological sign Gemini. Anise is also considered masculine.

4. Basil
Blossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder. The word Basil comes from the Greeks, meaning “King”.  Basil is sacred to Vishnu, Tulasi and Erzulie, masculine in nature, and associated with the element of fire and the planet Mars. Basil helps steady the mind, brings happiness, love, peace, and money and protects against insanity.

5. Calendula / Marigold
A great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds a dash of magick to any dish. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans all loved calendula and used it for culinary and healing purposes. During the medieval period it was considered a cure for just about everything.  Marigold is associated with the Sun. Calendula symbolizes love and constancy.  It is great for wedding bouquets and decorations. It is the traditional “he loves me, he loves me not” flower and is useful for love potions. Dried petals can be strewn to consecrate an area or burned in consecration incense. They are also a good addition to dream pillows.

6. Carnations
Petals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.  In ancient Rome, carnations were known as “Jove’s Flower” as a tribute to their beloved king of the gods, Jupiter.  Carnations are masculine, associated with the Sun and Jupiter, and with the element fire.  Those things that fall under the rule of Jupiter are ideal for use in magickal applications related to luck, money, good fortune, status, legal matters, fertility, friendship, ambition, career, success and protection. The flowers can be used to lend strength in healing applications. The practitioner can also use carnation essential oils to increase health and vigor.

7. Chamomile
Small and daisy like, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.  The Romans used Chamomile for incense.  Chamomile was used in ancient Egypt for fevers and was dedicated to their Sun God Ra.  Chamomile is associated with the sun, Leo and the element of water. It helps cleanse and invigorate the throat chakra (5th). It is associated with various Sun Gods, including Cernunnos, Lugh and others.  It is used in spells for money, peace, love, tranquility and purification.

8. Chrysanthemum / Mum
A little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals. In Celtic folklore, chrysanthemums in the garden were considered a meeting place for the faeries. Chrysanthemum is masculine in nature and resonates with the energy of the Sun and the element of fire.  Chrysanthemum has been used for burial rituals and is a suitable decoration for Samhain and for ancestral altars.  The dried flower heads of chrysanthemum can be burned during house blessings ceremonies. 

9. Dandelion
The bright yellow flowers should be gathered as soon as they open. Remove the green bits from the base of the flower before using. These can be added to wines, vinegar or jellies. The name dandelion comes from the French, “dent de lion” which means “tooth of the lion”.  The dandelion is masculine in action and associated with the planet Jupiter, the element of air and both Pisces and Sagittarius. It is also associated with any solar deity, Hecate, Brigid and Belenos.  A tea of the flowers and leaves may be consumed to increase psychic ability, while pouring boiling water over a bowlful of roots will aid in calling spirits.   You can also make a wish and blow the seeds off a dandelion head.

10. Lavender
Sweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes. Some of the earliest recorded uses of lavender are by the Roman soldiers who used the wild-growing plant to perfume their bathwater and wash their clothes. Lavender is masculine in action and associated with Mercury. It is also associated with the element of air and the astrological sign Virgo. It may be used as an asperging herb (to sprinkle water for purification purposes) and dried lavender sticks or wands can be burnt like incense. It is also useful in spells to sharpen the mind, to encourage or strengthen pure love and to encourage fertility. The scent of lavender is relaxing and uplifting all at once making it a great aromatherapy for stressed out or depressed individuals. Try adding some lavender oil to your bath or add it to mild oil for a relaxing massage at the end of a hard day. Stuffing a pillow with lavender buds may help insomniacs relax and fall asleep and soothes headaches.

11.  Oregano
The flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf. Oregano is ruled by Venus and the element of air and associated with Aphrodite. It is used in spells for happiness, tranquility, luck, health, protection and letting go of a loved one. It can also be used in spells to deepen existing love. When worn on the head during sleep, it is said to promote psychic dreams. Oregano symbolizes joy. Use it for rituals celebrating joyful occasions, or in spells to bring joy into one’s life.

12.  Rose
Remove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties. From the time of Solomon, the rose has been the flower most closely linked with love. The rose was sacred to Venus, the Roman goddess of love, and was connected to her messenger, Cupid. Roses have been cultivated for over 5,000 years. Roses are associated with Aphrodite, Adonis and Eros. Rosewater is a protective agent worn on clothes. Rose petals can be added to charms against the evil eye.

13.  Rosemary
Flowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary. The word Rosmarinus is from the Latin meaning “dew of the sea”.  Rosemary is also associated with Aphrodite and appears in many ancient images of Her. Rosemary was used to ward off evil spirits and nightmares. The wood was used to make musical instruments. Rosemary is male in nature and ruled by Leo, the element fire and the sun (or Moon, depending who you ask).  It’s sacred to Hebe, Aphrodite and the Virgin Mary. Rosemary can be used in spells for fidelity and remembrance as well as to dispel jealousy. Rosemary is useful for ritual baths, and for making sacred herbal water for ritual cleansing, blessing and purification. Bathing in rosemary will enhance your memory.  

14. Sage
Blossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves. Sage is a hardy perennial of the mint family.  The Romans regarded sage quite highly and much sacrifice and ceremony was associated with its harvest. They believed it stimulated the brain and memory and used it to clean their teeth. Sage is masculine in nature and associated the element of air and the planet Jupiter. Sage is sacred to the Greek Zeus and Roman Jupiter. It is also a symbol of the Virgin Mary. Sage is used in magical workings for immortality, longevity, wisdom, protection and the granting of wishes. Sage is also believed to help alleviate sorrow of the death of a loved one.

15. Sunflower
Petals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke. Sunflower is associated with the sun and all solar deities. Its essence helps balance the first chakra and also helps with confidence in leadership roles. Sunflower oil can be used as carrier oil for healing oils used in massages and ointments.

16. Violets
Another famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks. In Roman mythology, violets were said to be lesser goddesses who once dared to rival the beauty of Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty.  Violets are affiliated with the planet Venus or Pluto and are associated with the nymphs of ancient Greek myths.  Violets are also associated with death and rebirth through the story of Attis. Violets are useful in love spells and may be carried as an amulet to increase one’s luck in love. Try combining them with lavender for an enhanced effect.

 Sources:  HerbalRiot, Cheralyndarcey, Witches of the Craft, Inspirationforthespirit,  Witchipedia 

10

A curious herbal containing five hundred cuts, of the most useful plants, which are now used in the practice of physick engraved on folio copper plates, 

By Blackwell, Elizabeth,
John Nourse.
Samuel Harding.
Publication info
London : Printed for Samuel Harding, 1737-1739.
BHL Collections:
Blog Features
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Materia Medica
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Rare Books Collections

How To Make And Prepare Herbs

Since the effectiveness and the value of most herbs are greatest when the plants are fresh, the best preparations are usually those that you make yourself from freshly gather herbs. And what a satisfying feeling to be able to identify your remedy in the field and to extract natures healing elements and put them to use, all through your own efforts! (Some plants, however, should be used only dried or in professional preparations to avoid or minimize the detrimental effects.)

But even the best plant materials can be ruined if you use the wrong kind of process in preparing your remedies. The choice depends primarily on the identity of the plant, the plant parts being used, the elements to be extracted, the form in which the remedy will be taken or applied, and the effect to be achieved. A little experimentation will soon indicate the adjustments that need to be made to suit you or someone else’s needs.

Don’t be impatient, though, if you don’t get immediate results from the preparations. Herbs are not one-shot wonder drugs in the modern sense; rather, their effectiveness is based on gradual action to restore the natural balance of bodily functions that constitutes health. Very few plant remedies produce lasting beneficial effects after only one or two doses; most treatments involve taking the remedy daily for at least several weeks of this is also greatly helped or hindered by your overall lifestyle, especially your diet. A healthful  diet and sufficient exercise to keep your body in good condition are valuable for both preventing much illness and for helping to overcome it when it does strike.

The only prepared remedies that can be kept for any length of time are ointments and those made with alcohol. The alcohol will preserve the latter, and a little gum benzoin or tincture or benzoin(a drop per ounce of fat) will preserve selves or ornaments made with a perishable base. Make infusions, decoctions, cold extracts, juice, poultices, and fomentations fresh each time. Whenever you do store any plant preparations, sterilize the containers before putting the preparations in them.

The following types of preparations are those most commonly and conveniently used in herbal medicine. The doses given our four average adult use and must be adjusted for age and condition for children and weak or elderly people, or when using very potent plants, use 130 to 2/3 the adult dose.

INFUSION

An infusion is a beverage made like tea, by combining boiling water with plants, usually the green parts or the flowers, and steeping to extract their active ingredients. The relatively short exposure to heat in this method of preparation minimizes the loss of volatile elements. The usual amount is about 1/2oz to 1oz to a pint of water. Most often the water is poured over the plants, but some recipes require that the plants be added to boiling water, the pot then being immediately removed from the heat. Use an enamel, porcelain, or glass pot to steep the plants for about 10 minutes; then cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid to minimize evaporation. For drinking, strain the infusion into a cup or glass. Sometimes sugar or honey is added to improve the taste. For most purposes, take the infusion luke warm or cool; but to induce sweating and to break up a cold or a cough, take it hot. Most herbal teas are taking over a period of time in small, regular doses ranging from a teaspoon to a mouthful. The cumulative daily dose usually ranges from 1 to 4 cups, depending on the severity of the problem and the potency of the plant.

DECOCTION

When you want to extract primarily the mineral salts and the bitter principles of plans, rather than the vitamins on volatile ingredients, decoction is your method of preparation. Hard materials such as wood, roots, bark, and seeds, also generally require boiling to extract their active ingredients. Boil about a half ounce plant parts per cup of water in it and I’m old or nonmetallic pot. Green plant parts can be added to cold water, brought to a boil,and boiled for 3 to 4 minutes; or they can be added to boiling water and then boiled for the same time. The mixture then steeps with a cover on the pot for 2 to 3 minutes. Hard materials need boiling for about 10 minutes the longer steeping to extract their ingredients. Strain of the plant parts before drinking or using the decoction. Directions for taking decoctions are the same as for infusions.

COLD EXTRACT

Preparation with cold water effectively preserve the most volatile ingredients and extract only minor amounts of mineral salts and bitter principles. Add about double the amount of plant material used for an infusion to cold water in and enamelled or nonmetallic pot. Let the mixture stand for 8 to 12 hours, strain, and the drink is ready. Directions for taking are the same as for infusions.  (Korach: I’ve had luck using oil and alcohol for Cold Extracts. My favorite being minced garlic in olive oil, I use it primarily for cooking)

JUICE

Chop fresh plants or plant parts up into small pieces and press to squeeze out the juice. Add a  little water to the pressed material and press again to get the rest. This is a good method for extracting water-soluble constituents, especially those sensitive to heat. It is excellent for getting vitamins and miinerals from the plant; but the juice must be taken within a short time after pressing, since a vitamin content declines rapidly after fermentation sets in.(Korach: Of course we also have Juicers & Cold Presses to do this)

POWDER

Grind dried plant parts with the mortar and pestle and or other implements until you have a powder. Powder can be taken with water, milk, or soup; sprinkled on food; or swallowed in gelatin capsules. A number 0 capsule holds about 10 grains; number 00 holds about 15 grains. The most common dose for powders is the amount that you can pick up on the tip of a dinner knife.

SYRUP

A basic syrup to which you can add medicine ingredients can be made by simply boiling 3lbs  of raw or brown sugar in a pint of water until it reaches the right consistency. Or you can boil the plant materials in honey or store-bought syrup and then strain through cheesecloth. Syrup is especially useful for administering medicines to children.

TINCTURE

Combine 1oz to 4oz powdered herb(the amount depends on the plant’s potency) with 8 to 12 ounces of alcohol. Add water to make a 50% alcohol solution(you have to know what percent alcohol you started). Let stand for two weeks, shaking once or twice a day; then strain and pour the liquid into a bottle suitable for storage. Like other alcoholic extracts tinctures will keep for a long time. Homeopaths use very dilute tinctures as their basic medicinal preparations.

ESSENCE

Dissolve an ounce of the herb’s essential oil in a pint of alcohol. This is a good way to preserve the volatile essential oils of many plants, which are generally not suitable in water.

OINTMENT

Mix well one part of the remedy in powdered form with four parts hot petroleum jelly, lard, or similar substance. For purists, an old method is to boil the ingredients in water until the desired properties are extracted. Strain the liquid add the decoction to olive or other vegetable oil, and simmer until the water has completely evaporated. Add beeswax as needed to get a firm consistency. Melt the mixture by heating slowly, and stir until completely blended. I was pointed out above, a little gum benzoin or a drop of tincture of benzoin per ounce of fat(when a Percival fat is used as a base) will help to preserve the ointment.

POULTICE

The poultice, or cataplasm, is used to apply a remedy to a skin area with moist heat. To prepair, bruise or crush the medicinal parts of the plant to a pulp mass and heat. If using dried plants(or if needed even with fresh plants), moisten the materials by mixing with a hot, soft, adhesive substance, such as moist flour or corn meal, or a mixture of bread and milk. Apply directly to the skin. A good way is to spread the pace or pulp on a wet, hot cloth, apply, and wrap the cloth around to help retain moisture and heat. Moisten the cloth with hot water periodically as necessary. Where the irritant plants are involved(as in a Mustard “plaster”), keep the pace between the two pieces of cloth to prevent direct contact with the skin; after removing the poultice, wash the area well with water or herb tea(especially camomile or mugwort) to remove any residue that may have gotten on the skin. You can use the poultice to soothe, to irritate, or to draw impurities from the body depending on which plant or plants you use.

FOMENTATION

Sook cloth or towel in an infusion or decoction, ring out the excess, and apply as hot as possible to the affected area. A fomentation has about the same applications as a poultice but is generally less active and its effect.

COLD COMPRESS

Soak cloth or towel in an infusion or decoction that has been cooled, wring out the excess, and apply to the affected area. Leave on until it is warmed by body heat, usually 15 to 20 minutes. Repeat application with a fresh cool compress. Continue until relieved.

HYDROTHERAPY: The Herb Bath

Hydrotherapy – the use of water for treatment of illness – is particularly popular in Europe, where health spas have elaborate facilities for all types of “water cures.” Often these include the use of mineral water or of mineral and herbal bath additives to enhance the natural healing power of the water or to produce particular effects on the body. But you don’t have to go to a European health resort to take healing baths: with a few simple supplies, you can enjoy the benefits right at home.

Full or partial herb baths come in all shapes and sizes, from the bathtub to the eyecup. Basically they are baths to which plant decoctions or infusions have been added. Depending on the plants used and the temperature, such baths can calm or stimulate the mind and body; open or close pores; relieve inflammation, itching, or pain; and exert various other beneficial effects.

Flower Ingredients for Emotional Healing

While researching alternative healing methods I came across the flower healing extracts. The idea being that certain flowers would help with different emotional and mental states. While this is actually a still existing alternative medicine and not actual witchcraft ingredients, there is some overlap and some plants and flowers I don’t normally see on ingredients posts

I found the list interesting, and even though some of these flowers may be harder to come by than many kitchen witch ingredients, I thought those on the tumblr witchcraft community who are looking to experiment with different ingredients to refine their potions, spells, and charms might benefit from trying some of these flowers. If you find any of this list helps in your craft I would love to hear about it

Fear

Rock Rose (Helianthemum nummalarium) – Extreme fear, terror, panic

Mimulus (Mimulus guttatus) – shyness, timidity, known fears

Cherry Plum (prunus cerasifera) – collapse of mental control, vicious temper, fear of doing harm or self-harm

Aspen (populous tremula) – apprehension, foreboding, unknown and vague fears

Red chestnut (aesculus carnea) – exaggerated fear of others (especially loved ones), anxiety of “the worst”

Overcare for others’ welfare

Chicory (cichorium intybus) – possessiveness, demanding respect and obedience, selfishness

Vervain (verbena officinalis) – overenthusiasm, fanaticism, nervousness, rage at injustice

Vine (vitis vinifera) – domination, inflexibility, ambition, strength, tyranny, autocracy

Beech (fagus sylvatica) – intolerance, criticism, arrogance, judgmental tendencies

Rock Water (water from well or spring) – self-denial, rigidity, tightness, self-repression, example setting, self-righteousness

Lack of Interest

Clematis (clematis vitalba) – daydreaming, indifference, inattention, escapism

Honeysuckle (lonicera caprifolium) – nostalgia, living in the past, homesickness

Wild rose (rosa canina) – resignation, apathy, no ambition

Olive (olea europaea) – complete exhaustion, loss of energy, overwhelmed by daily tasks

White chestnut (aesculus hippocastanum) – persistent unwanted worries, mental arguments

Mustard (sinapis arvensis) – deep gloom, melancholia

Chestnut bud (aesculus hippocastanum) – slowness in learning life lessons, repetition of mistakes

Despondency and despair

Larch (larix decidua) – lack of confidence, fear of failure, unwillingness to try, feelings of inferiority

Pine (pinus sylvestris) – guilt, self-reproach, feeling unworthy, taking blame for others

Elm (ulmus procera) – overwhelmed by responsibility though normally capable

Sweet chestnut (castanea sativa) – extreme anguish, desolation, at limit of endurance (nonsuicidal)

Star of Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) – reactions to fright, serious news, great sorrow, trauma

Willow (salix vitellina) – Resentment, bitterness, self-pity

Oak (quercus robur) – struggling against illness (mental or physical)

Crab apple (malus pumilia) – feeling unclean in mind or body, self-image issues

Loneliness

Water violet (hottonia palustris) – pride, reserved, aloof, overly independent

Impatiens (impatiens glandulifera) – impatience with others, hastiness, jumping to conclusions or actions

Heather (calluna vulgaris) – over-concern with self, overtalkative, poor listening, hatred of being alone

Oversensitivity

Agrimony (agrimonia eupatoria) – inner torture, hiding worries

Centaury (centaurium umbellatum) – weak will, anxiety to please, inability to say “no”

Walnut (juglans regia) – difficulty in transition or change, wavering before powerful influences

Holly (ilex aquifolium) – lack of love for others, envy, jealousy, hatred, suspicion

Uncertainty

Cerato (ceratostigma willmottiana) – doubting own judgment, seeking approval of others before acting

Scleranthus (scleranthus annuus) – uncertainty, indecision, fluctuating moods

Gentian (gentiana amarella) – despondence, easily discouraged, dejected

Gorse (ulex europaeus) – extreme hopelessness, despair, pessimism, negativity

Hornbeam (carpinus betulus) – procrastination, lack of energy for tasks

Wild oat (bromus ramosus) – lack of fulfillment, aimless ambition, feeling out of place