medical,

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Black cats are very often overlooked at shelters because they’re deemed as boring or bad luck. Nevertheless, this didn’t bother David when he went to adopt Scrappy - a black cat. After a few years, David noticed that Scrappy was slowly changing colour and developing patches of white throughout his fur. As it so turned out, Scrappy had a skin condition called vitiligo in which white patches appear on the skin of humans or on the fur of animals.

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The Sick Rose is a visual tour through the golden age of medical illustration. The nineteenth century experienced an explosion of epidemics such as cholera and diphtheria, driven by industrialization, urbanization and poor hygiene. In this pre-color-photography era, accurate images were relied upon to teach students and aid diagnosis. The best examples, featured here, are remarkable pieces of art that attempted to elucidate the mysteries of the body, and the successive onset of each affliction.  From here

Cardiac distress symptoms in women

In the wake of Carrie Fisher’s death four days after she suffered a massive heart attack, one thing that was reported by some news outlets was that she had been in “significant distress” on the flight. We don’t know the exact details of this, but in my experience as an EMT, it often means “hysterical woman having a panic attack and thinking she’s dying…*woman dies* …oops, guess she really was dying.” 

It is SO IMPORTANT to remember that many women present in what medicine considers an ‘atypical’ manner for heart attack, but it actually IS typical…for women. Women are more than twice as likely to die from cardiac emergencies, not because our physiology is that much different than men and thus gives us a worse chance at survival (it’s actually better if treated promptly and adequately), but because our symptoms are more likely to go unrecognized or to be dismissed entirely.

Thus, please take a moment to review and pass on this list of cardiac distress symptoms as seen in women: 

Shortness of breath - This is the most common one. If a woman, especially one without prior history of respiratory issues or shortness of breath, seems to be having trouble catching her breath and/or complains of such, pay very close attention. If she continues to feel winded after sitting or laying down, it’s probably time to call for help.

Feeling of impending doom - This can range from a sense of general unease to a full-blown panic attack. This one is extremely important, and is the symptom most commonly disregarded by doctors and hospital staff. If a woman tells you that she feels ‘not quite right,’ or like something terrible is about to happen, or that she’s about to die, LISTEN TO HER FFS. 

Nausea and “indigestion” - Also common. Heart attacks frequently present as a feeling of vague nausea or indigestion, but unlike typical heartburn, antacids and other OTC treatments will not alleviate the symptoms.

Hiccups - Unexplained hiccups, especially if seen with any of the other symptoms listed above, can be indicative of heart muscle that is being acutely or chronically starved of oxygen.  The exact mechanism isn’t known, but it’s thought that the enzymes released by the dying muscle irritate the pericardium and adjacent diaphragm, causing spasms in the healthy muscle. 

Fatigue - This is another commonly seen symptom, and is often overlooked or ignored as just transient tiredness. Many women having a heart attack will complain of feeling “flu-like” symptoms of nausea, sweating, fatigue, and shortness of breath, and they’ll lie down for a nap and never wake up. 

Lightheadedness - A feeling of being lightheaded or about to faint isn’t terribly uncommon in many benign conditions, and many women experience it on a monthly basis. However - be aware when it appears unexpectedly or unexplainedly, and/or with one or more of the other symptoms on this list. 

Sweating (diaphoresis) - Heart attack does funny things to the sympathetic nervous system, which is behind reflexes such as sweating and hiccups. If a lady is experiencing unexplained or excessive sweating, pay attention to anything else that might be going on with her. 

Tingling or numb extremities - A feeling of numbness or “pins and needles” tingling in the extremities can be an important sign that cardiac function is being impaired and those body parts aren’t receiving enough oxygen. 

Peripheral and/or central cyanosis - Often accompanies tingling or numbness, and is considered a later-stage symptom of cardiac distress and heart failure. Finger and toe tips will turn pale or blue first, and lips and gums after that. Important to remember that darker-skinned women may present cyanosis as ashen, grey, or darker purple rather than pale or blue. 

Back pain - Pain between the shoulder blades, in the cervical spine, or even further down in the torso or lumbar region can be a symptom of heart attack. Alone, it isn’t that suspicious, but if it’s unrelenting and presents with any of the other symptoms above, keep a watchful eye on things. 

Classic “crushing” or “tight” chest pain or pressure - Women DO experience this classic pain, too, just not as frequently as men do. This may be due to our higher pain threshold, or differences in blood volume, or maybe we’re just not sure because nobody’s bothered to really study it. Whatever the reason, some women do still experience the crushing or tightening pain, and others may experience less painful pressure or tightness that doesn’t seem to be relieved by anything.

Arm and jaw pain - Another “classic” heart attack symptom, and a bit more common than central chest pain. Unexplained pain in the left arm or shoulder, and on the left side of the neck or jaw, should not be ignored by anyone.

5 Biggest Myths About Planned Parenthood: DEBUNKED

There is a lot of misinformation out there about Planned Parenthood — much of which has been pushed forward by anti-women’s health politicians and groups focused on blocking patients from turning to Planned Parenthood health centers for reproductive health care.

They’re trying to block people with Medicaid coverage from accessing preventive care at Planned Parenthood health centers — including birth control, cancer screenings, and STD/STI testing and treatment.


Myth #1: Other providers can absorb Planned Parenthood’s patient base

As experts have demonstrated over and over again, community health centers don’t have the capacity to absorb the 2.4 million Planned Parenthood patients.

Repeating the same lie over and over again doesn’t make it true. So when House Speaker Paul Ryan and other anti-abortion politicians in Washington say that the country’s overburdened, publicly funded community health centers (CHCs) will take up the slack in the event these politicians “defund” Planned Parenthood, don’t believe them for a minute. Better yet, call your U.S. senators to let them know the facts.

Defunding,” by the way, doesn’t stop federal taxpayer money from paying for abortions – because federal law already prohibits federal dollars from going to abortion, except in dire circumstances. Instead, “defunding” simply blocks patients who rely on public health care funds from getting care at Planned Parenthood health centers.

Read More: No, Community Health Centers Cannot Absorb Planned Parenthood Patients


Myth #2: Planned Parenthood is unpopular and should be defunded

20 separate nationwide polls and an additional 12 polls in key states show strong favorability for Planned Parenthood and strong opposition to efforts in Congress to block patients from accessing high-quality, lifesaving care at Planned Parenthood.

These poll results stem from the deep and longstanding relationship that many Americans have with Planned Parenthood, the nation’s leading provider of reproductive health care and sex education. For a century, people have relied on Planned Parenthood for care and information, and each year Planned Parenthood health centers serve millions of patients essential services, such as birth control, lifesaving cancer screenings, safe and legal abortion, and other high-quality health care.

An estimated one in five American women has relied on Planned Parenthood for care in her lifetime.

Read More: Fact: Public Overwhelmingly Supports Planned Parenthood


Myth #3: Planned Parenthood uses federal tax dollars for abortions

Does the Government Fund Planned Parenthood?

With all the talk in Washington about “defunding Planned Parenthood,” you might think there’s a specific, Planned Parenthood line item in the federal budget that Congress and the president can just zero out. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Most federal funds come through Medicaid, the government-funded health insurance plan for people with low incomes. Just like other kinds of insurance, Medicaid reimburses Planned Parenthood’s doctors and nurses for the preventive medical services they provide, including lifesaving cancer screenings, HIV tests, and birth control.

Read More: How Federal Funding Works at Planned Parenthood


Myth #4: Planned Parenthood has its own line item in the federal budget

Fact: There is no line item in the federal budget that goes to Planned Parenthood.

The phrase “defunding” Planned Parenthood is a misnomer.

Planned Parenthood does not receive a blank check from the federal government.

Just like hospitals, Planned Parenthood health centers get Medicaid reimbursements for critical services provided to low-income patients — services like birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment.

And per the Hyde Amendment (which has been the law for more than 40 years) — federal Medicaid funds do not go toward abortion (with limited exceptions outlined under Hyde).

More than 50% of Planned Parenthood’s patients rely on Medicaid to access preventive care. The Senate’s “Trumpcare” bill would block many Americans from getting the affordable health care they rely on.


Myth #5: “Defunding” Planned Parenthood will save the country money

No, “defunding” Planned Parenthood will not save the country money.

Efforts to shut down Planned Parenthood threaten to harm women’s health and their economic security. And these efforts don’t make fiscal sense for the country — every public dollar spent on family planning services is estimated to save the government $7.09 in state and federal dollars.

On the evening of 19 February, 1994, Gloria Ramirez was rushed to the emergency room of Riverside Hospital, California. And here was the beginning of one of the world’s most baffling medical mysteries.

Gloria had been suffering from the effects of advanced cervical cancer. She was immensely confused as well as suffering from tachycardia and Cheyene-Strokes respiration. When she arrived at the hospital, she was injected with several drugs including diazepam and lorazepam to keep her sedated. Gloria immediately started responding to the drugs negatively leading doctors to defibrillate her heart. It was now that doctors began to notice some oddities.

There appeared to be an oily sheen which was covering Gloria’s body and a fruity, garlic, odour emanated from her. When a nurse attempted to draw blood from Gloria, she noticed an ammonia-like smell. When another nurse attempted to draw blood, she noticed particles floating in the blood. Suddenly, the nurse fainted, followed by another nurse and another nurse. In total, 23 people within the vicinity of Gloria became ill with 5 being hospitalised. Gloria was soon afterwards pronounced dead with the cause of death being listed as kidney failure.

The main theory was that Gloria had been using dimethyl sulfoxide as a way to alleviate her pain. Two months after her death, her decomposed body was released to her family who wanted an independent autopsy. Their pathologist could not determine a cause of death. Gloria became known as the “toxic lady.”

Medical Terminology! YAY! ✺◟( • ω • )◞✺

Just more fun words to know. :)

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Acne にきび :  面皰
Allergy アレルギー
Asthma ぜんそく :  喘息
Bee sting ハチさしきず  :  ハチ刺し傷
Bruise だぼくしょう :  打撲傷
Burn やけど :  火傷
Cold  かぜ  :  風邪
Constipation べんぴ :  便秘
Cough せき :  咳
Diarrhea げり :  下痢
Dizziness めまい :  目眩
Ear infection じえん :  耳炎
Fatigue ひろう  :  疲労
Fever ねつ :  熱
Flu  インフルエンザ
Food poisoning しょくちゅうどく :  食中毒
Frostbite とうしょう :  凍傷
Headache ずつう :  頭痛
Heartburn むねやけ  :  胸焼け
Hives じんましん :  蕁麻疹
Indigestion しょうかふりょう :  消化不良
Ingrown nail かんにゅうそう :  陥入爪
Itchy かゆい :  痒い
Lump こぶ :  瘤
Nausea はきけ :  吐き気
Nosebleed はなぢ :  鼻血
Pain くつう :  苦痛
Rash はっしん :  発疹
Runny nose はなみず :  鼻水
Sore throat のどのいたみ :  喉の痛み
Sprain ねんざ :  捻挫
Sunburn ひやけ :  日焼け
Toothache しつう :  歯痛
Vomiting おうと :  嘔吐

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