medical forensics

Nazi doctor Josef Mengele’s bones used in Brazil forensic medicine courses

For more than 30 years, the bones of Josef Mengele, the German doctor who conducted horrific experiments on thousands of Jews at Auschwitz, lay unclaimed inside a blue plastic bag in São Paulo’s Legal Medical Institute.

Dr Daniel Romero Muñoz, who led the team that identified Mengele’s remains in 1985, saw an opportunity to put them to use. Several months ago, the head of the department of legal medicine at the University of São Paulo’s Medical School obtained permission to use them in his forensic medical courses. Today, his students are now learning their trade studying Mengele’s bones and connecting them to the life story of the man called the “angel of death”.

 “The bones will be helpful to teach how to examine the remains of an individual and then match that information with data in documents related to the person,” Muñoz said recently, flanked by students.

Forensic doctor Daniel Muñoz shows the skull of Nazi war criminal Josef Mengele to medical students in São Paulo, Brazil. Photograph: Andre Penner/AP

The thin black-blue line visible along the margin of the gums, at the base of the teeth,known as Burton’s line, indicates lead poisoning and occurs due to deposition of lead sulfide, the result of a reaction between sulfur produced by oral flora and lead. It is caused by a reaction between circulating lead with sulphur ions released by oral bacterial activity, which deposits lead sulphide at the junction of the teeth and gums, resulting in a Burton’s line.

*WIPES EVERYTHING OFF YOUR DESK BEFORE SLAMMING FISTS VIOLENTLY ON IT*

REVERSE FAHC!AU

CAPTAIN GEOFF RAMSEY IS IN CHARGE OF THE LSPD WITH HIS SECOND HAND SGT. PATTILLO, THEY’RE IN CHARGE OF MAKING LOS SANTOS A MORE LIVABLE PLACE.

THERE’S DETECTIVE M. JONES AND DETECTIVE FREE; DETECTIVE HAYWOOD AND HIS DETECTIVE-IN-TRAINING, CADET DOOLEY; MEDICAL EXAMINER AND FORENSIC ANALYST DR. COLLINS; CORRECTION OFFICERS HARDY AND BRAGG; AND EVIDENCE TECHNICIAN L. JONES.

THEY’RE DOING THEIR DAMN BEST TO STOP THE ROOSTERS, THE SPOT ON CREW, AND WHAT EVER ELSE THROWS THEMSELVES IN THE HELLHOLE OF LOS SANTOS.

With cerebral fat embolism syndrome, there is loss of consciousness. Note the multitude of petechial hemorrhages (red and pinkish specks) here, mostly within the white matter. Cerebral edema and herniation may follow. Overall, few persons with a history of trauma will develop fat embolism, but it is difficult to predict which patients will. Protean manifestations include: hypoxemia, mental status changes, petechiae, fever, tachycardia, and thrombocytopenia.

Saponification is the process of the human body partly or completely turning to soap. The fatty tissue and the liquid from putrefaction gradually form into adipocere, which is also known as grave wax. This process can happen to emabalmed and non-embalmed bodies. It is most common with those who are overweight. The photograph above is of “The Soap Lady” who is housed at the Mutter Museum. She is entirely composed of grave wax.

An amazing 3 part series I’ve been watching of live autopsies performed in front of an audience by experts in the field. Extremely insightful into the human body and all it’s forms and varieties. Forensics and medical students alike would LOVE this, it delves into injuries of the body such as stab wounds or fall injuries. It also talks about lifestyle choices and their effects on the body, as well as the whole first dvd being dedicated to basic anatomy of all of the body systems!
Can’t recommend this series enough, it’s awesome!
Be warned though, if you’re squeamish in any way, this series is very much NOT for you. Lots of gore.

- Flick xx

This graphite illustration involved drawing a skull specimen and then reconstructing what the persons face might have looked like using knowledge of muscles, tissue depth, age, race, sex…etc.


New York’s Chief Medical Examiner Seeks to Lead in DNA Research

Dr. Sampson, who had been acting chief since 2013, officially took the helm in December with the goal of pushing state-of-the-art research in DNA evidence collection and genetic investigations of mysterious deaths. But she does so at a time when the office is seeking to right itself after high-profile mistakes — a technician’s mishandling of rape evidence; a body that went missing — sparked city investigations and risked tarnishing its reputation.

More recently, the medical examiner’s office also found itself thrust into the debate over the police killing of Eric Garner on Staten Island after the agency officially linked his death to an officer’s chokehold.

In an interview in her office, shortly after her appointment, Dr. Sampson said she hoped that a focus on quality assurance, along with a new lab supervisor and a 24-hour operations center for tracking bodies as they move from street to morgue, would curb human errors. She said that those isolated mistakes had not undermined the advanced science that was performed at the lab and was often presented at trial.

“The science was never in question,” she said.

Despite the sheen of forensic testing in television crime dramas, it remains a profession troubled by an image problem. “It’s not a glamorous field,” Dr. Sampson conceded.

At the same time, it is one that increasingly attracts women. A majority of the medical examiners in New York City are women, Dr. Sampson said.

While most of her own mentors were men, including Dr. Hirsch, she said she did have one important female role model: her mother, who graduated from medical school in 1960 when there were few women doing so.

“She always told me if you want to do it, you can do it,” Dr. Sampson said. “That’s how I was raised; that’s how I hope I’m raising my daughter.”

The New York Times