child handling for the childless nurse

My current job has me working with children, which is kind of a weird shock after years in environments where a “young” patient is 40 years old.  Here’s my impressions so far:

Birth - 1 year: Essentially a small cute animal.  Handle accordingly; gently and affectionately, but relying heavily on the caregivers and with no real expectation of cooperation.

Age 1 - 2: Hates you.  Hates you so much.  You can smile, you can coo, you can attempt to soothe; they hate you anyway, because you’re a stranger and you’re scary and you’re touching them.  There’s no winning this so just get it over with as quickly and non-traumatically as possible.

Age 3 - 5: Nervous around medical things, but possible to soothe.  Easily upset, but also easily distracted from the thing that upset them.  Smartphone cartoons and “who wants a sticker?!!?!?” are key management techniques.

Age 6 - 10: Really cool, actually.  I did not realize kids were this cool.  Around this age they tend to be fairly outgoing, and super curious and eager to learn.  Absolutely do not babytalk; instead, flatter them with how grown-up they are, teach them some Fun Gross Medical Facts, and introduce potentially frightening experiences with “hey, you want to see something really cool?”

Age 11 - 14: Extremely variable.  Can be very childish or very mature, or rapidly switch from one mode to the other.  At this point you can almost treat them as an adult, just… a really sensitive and unpredictable adult.  Do not, under any circumstances, offer stickers.  (But they might grab one out of the bin anyway.)

Age 15 - 18: Basically an adult with severely limited life experience.  Treat as an adult who needs a little extra education with their care.  Keep parents out of the room as much as possible, unless the kid wants them there.  At this point you can go ahead and offer stickers again, because they’ll probably think it’s funny.  And they’ll want one.  Deep down, everyone wants a sticker.

On the evening of 19 February, 1994, Gloria Ramirez was rushed to the emergency room of Riverside Hospital, California. And here was the beginning of one of the world’s most baffling medical mysteries.

Gloria had been suffering from the effects of advanced cervical cancer. She was immensely confused as well as suffering from tachycardia and Cheyne-Stokes respiration. When she arrived at the hospital, she was injected with several drugs including diazepam and lorazepam to keep her sedated. Gloria immediately started responding to the drugs negatively leading doctors to defibrillate her heart. It was now that doctors began to notice some oddities.

There appeared to be an oily sheen which was covering Gloria’s body and a fruity, garlic, odour emanated from her. When a nurse attempted to draw blood from Gloria, she noticed an ammonia-like smell. When another nurse attempted to draw blood, she noticed particles floating in the blood. Suddenly, the nurse fainted, followed by another nurse and another nurse. In total, 23 people within the vicinity of Gloria became ill with 5 being hospitalised. Gloria was soon afterwards pronounced dead with the cause of death being listed as kidney failure.

The main theory was that Gloria had been using dimethyl sulfoxide as a way to alleviate her pain. Two months after her death, her decomposed body was released to her family who wanted an independent autopsy. Their pathologist could not determine a cause of death. Gloria became known as the “toxic lady.”

5 Biggest Myths About Planned Parenthood: DEBUNKED

There is a lot of misinformation out there about Planned Parenthood — much of which has been pushed forward by anti-women’s health politicians and groups focused on blocking patients from turning to Planned Parenthood health centers for reproductive health care.

They’re trying to block people with Medicaid coverage from accessing preventive care at Planned Parenthood health centers — including birth control, cancer screenings, and STD/STI testing and treatment.


Myth #1: Other providers can absorb Planned Parenthood’s patient base

As experts have demonstrated over and over again, community health centers don’t have the capacity to absorb the 2.4 million Planned Parenthood patients.

Repeating the same lie over and over again doesn’t make it true. So when House Speaker Paul Ryan and other anti-abortion politicians in Washington say that the country’s overburdened, publicly funded community health centers (CHCs) will take up the slack in the event these politicians “defund” Planned Parenthood, don’t believe them for a minute. Better yet, call your U.S. senators to let them know the facts.

Defunding,” by the way, doesn’t stop federal taxpayer money from paying for abortions – because federal law already prohibits federal dollars from going to abortion, except in dire circumstances. Instead, “defunding” simply blocks patients who rely on public health care funds from getting care at Planned Parenthood health centers.

Read More: No, Community Health Centers Cannot Absorb Planned Parenthood Patients


Myth #2: Planned Parenthood is unpopular and should be defunded

20 separate nationwide polls and an additional 12 polls in key states show strong favorability for Planned Parenthood and strong opposition to efforts in Congress to block patients from accessing high-quality, lifesaving care at Planned Parenthood.

These poll results stem from the deep and longstanding relationship that many Americans have with Planned Parenthood, the nation’s leading provider of reproductive health care and sex education. For a century, people have relied on Planned Parenthood for care and information, and each year Planned Parenthood health centers serve millions of patients essential services, such as birth control, lifesaving cancer screenings, safe and legal abortion, and other high-quality health care.

An estimated one in five American women has relied on Planned Parenthood for care in her lifetime.

Read More: Fact: Public Overwhelmingly Supports Planned Parenthood


Myth #3: Planned Parenthood uses federal tax dollars for abortions

Does the Government Fund Planned Parenthood?

With all the talk in Washington about “defunding Planned Parenthood,” you might think there’s a specific, Planned Parenthood line item in the federal budget that Congress and the president can just zero out. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Most federal funds come through Medicaid, the government-funded health insurance plan for people with low incomes. Just like other kinds of insurance, Medicaid reimburses Planned Parenthood’s doctors and nurses for the preventive medical services they provide, including lifesaving cancer screenings, HIV tests, and birth control.

Read More: How Federal Funding Works at Planned Parenthood


Myth #4: Planned Parenthood has its own line item in the federal budget

Fact: There is no line item in the federal budget that goes to Planned Parenthood.

The phrase “defunding” Planned Parenthood is a misnomer.

Planned Parenthood does not receive a blank check from the federal government.

Just like hospitals, Planned Parenthood health centers get Medicaid reimbursements for critical services provided to low-income patients — services like birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment.

And per the Hyde Amendment (which has been the law for more than 40 years) — federal Medicaid funds do not go toward abortion (with limited exceptions outlined under Hyde).

More than 50% of Planned Parenthood’s patients rely on Medicaid to access preventive care. The Senate’s “Trumpcare” bill would block many Americans from getting the affordable health care they rely on.


Myth #5: “Defunding” Planned Parenthood will save the country money

No, “defunding” Planned Parenthood will not save the country money.

Efforts to shut down Planned Parenthood threaten to harm women’s health and their economic security. And these efforts don’t make fiscal sense for the country — every public dollar spent on family planning services is estimated to save the government $7.09 in state and federal dollars.

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The Sick Rose is a visual tour through the golden age of medical illustration. The nineteenth century experienced an explosion of epidemics such as cholera and diphtheria, driven by industrialization, urbanization and poor hygiene. In this pre-color-photography era, accurate images were relied upon to teach students and aid diagnosis. The best examples, featured here, are remarkable pieces of art that attempted to elucidate the mysteries of the body, and the successive onset of each affliction.  From here

if you don’t know what your illness is yet…

  • that doesn’t mean you’re not sick
  • you will find answers
  • i believe that you’re sick
  • you will get through this tough time
  • you don’t owe anyone an explanation
  • you will get the necessary accommodations
  • those who truly care about you will help you
  • i love you
  • I believe in you
  • im here for you