medic phone

another coping post, people have told me to update it a bit and not limit the skills to delusions and auditory hallucinations. so now, the bigger and better coping post for psychotic symptoms (not just schizophrenia!) and i won’t do the “keep reading” thing, even though it’s a veeeery big post, because i kind of want people to see it. 

First off

try to manage your stress - psychotic symptoms has quite a lot to with stress. it’s also important for any mental health issue. 

don’t “self-medicate” - marijuana has shown to make psychotic symptoms worse and makes the risk of falling back into a psychosis bigger. other substances that can trigger/worsen/even cause psychotic symptoms are cocaine, speed, crystal meth, ecstasy, LSD, magic mushrooms and ketamine

take care of yourself - selfcare, mindfulsness, exercise, eat reguraly and healthy, sleep well… you get the idea.

know your early signs - it’s good to know when you start getting signs of another episode, so you can adjust your medication or talk to your doctor more often so you can avoid another episode. early signs may be sleeping less or more, isolation, being annoyed or thinking “is medication even necessery?” i

don’t isolate youself - this is a early symptom for me, before i get a psychotic episode, i often isolate myself and hate the world. that often lead to me being alone with my delusions and they get worse. so try to see friends often, especially when you have early signs. 

Auditory hallucinations

relax - voices are often caused by stress, so try to focus on your breathing.

distract yourself - focus on a task or watch tv.

ask your voices a question, that you dont know the answer to - if they dont know the answer the voices must be coming from within you.

background sounds - people have reported that listening to music or having the tv on sort of drowns the voices.

talk back to your voices - ask them to leave and say no if they order you to do things, remind yourself who’s in control.

know your triggers - it may help to keep a diary of when the voices are more active.

medication - modern anti-psychotics are 80-90% effective in revieling voices and will often make them disappear.

hum or sing - it drowns the voices as well as distract you.

read out loud - same with hum or sing

open your mouth really wide - i have no idea why or if this works, but you can try it! 

just a symptom - try to think of your voices as just a symptom, and not something that has a special meaning. after all, it’s just a random thought you can hear.


Visual hallucinations

this is quite a hard one, i haven’t experienced much visual hallucinations, so i don’t personally know what works and what doesn’t. and i don’t find much about it on internet. if you have any coping skills for visual hallucinations, let me know and i’ll include it! 

take a picture - if you’re unsure something is there you can try taking a picture 

turn away - or break eye contact, leave the room. if you don’t see it it’s not there 

shine on them  - if you see shadows you can try shining light on them from your phone flashlight 

medication - well, yeah, you get the idea. they work. 

five senses method -  acknowledge five things you can see; four things you can touch; three things you can hear; two things you can smell; one things you can taste. 

•  keep your pet near - if you have a pet it may help to tell you if something is real or not. if your pet doesn’t react you can assume it’s not real. 


Delusions

distraction - try to take your mind of it, even though it’s not that simple.

give them facts - checking facts and statistics may help

talk about them - in my case, the more i talked about my thoughts, the more unrealistic they seemed. That may not happen to everyone, but it is helpful to talk about them.

know your trigggers - delusions are also good to know when they’re more active.

medication - antipsychotis aren’t just helping for your hallucinations, but other symptoms as well - including delusions.


Disorganized speech

• count from one to three - start by thinking about (visualizing) the numbers in your head and focus on them before saying them aloud to align thought and speech centres of your brain.


Other symptoms 

trust me, i really wish i knew how to cope with the other symptoms. i don’t personally have much advice, and i can’t find much on internet, but if any of you know how to cope with these symptoms*, let me know and i’ll include it!

*some other symptoms are:

negative symtptoms - this could be not having energy, feeling indifferent towards things and gestures may decrease. 

catatonic behaviour - a bit more rare. it’s when the person stops moving and can be completely still for a long period of time. 

disorganized behaviour - appears as a decline in overall daily functioning, unpredictable or inappropriate emotional responses, behaviors that can appear bizarre and have no purpose, lack of impulse control. 

trouble thinking -  having too much thoughts or having slow thoughts

trouble functioning in social situations, isolation, trouble handling jobs or everyday chores. 


also, a big thank you to you guys who come with advice, you’re awesome 

Things that clients do that frustrate (aka piss off) veterinary staff

1. A new client not informing us that their pet is a known biter.

2. Questioning the diagnosis because Google said something different.

3. Wanting us to help your sick animal but not wanting to run any diagnostics so we can actually figure out what is wrong and treat appropriately.

4. Calling for an appointment in the morning, not showing up, show up late and getting pissed when we can’t accommodate you.

5. Asking to hold….now this is a bit controversial I will admit. But, in most cases owner’s don’t know how to properly restrain and I have seen the owner and the doctor get bit as a result.

6. Letting your children run wild in an exam room.

7. Bringing in a second pet for an exam when you are only scheduled for one.

8. Telling the technician one history and the doctor something completely different. Why yes, I do enjoy looking like a complete idiot. Thank you.

9. Ignoring the technician during discharge then calling us 30 minutes later because the technician didn’t tell you when to give the meds.

10. Wanting free medical advice over the phone…when you aren’t our client.

11. Lying about your recreational drug use when we ask if the pet got into anything. We know…we always know.

12. Complaining about the cost of vaccines.

13. Sending the spouse/SO that knows nothing about the pet to the appointment instead of the one that actually does.

14. Google DVM

15. Medical professionals that treat humans assuming they know veterinary medicine.

16. Telling us that their pets ears/eyes have been infected for months and you guess you should finally do something about it…then complain about the bill because it has gotten so bad.

17. Refuse pain meds for your obviously painful pet because you didn’t need them when you hurt yourself that one time.

18. Asking us to euthanize your healthy pet because you are unable to care for them…and refusing to surrender because no one will ever love them as much as you.

19. Telling my doctor’s they aren’t “real” doctors because you don’t like their diagnosis or the bill.

20. Rudeness.

21. Declining heartworm preventative because your dog doesn’t leave the yard.

22. And my own personal hell…commenting on your pets horrible breathe…discovering severely advanced dental disease then refusing to do a dental…because….$$

all these people carrying small purses bc they don’t have anxiety disorders are gonna regret it someday! don’t ask me for my five year old mints when The Disaster comes, sorry you were not prepared

3

hello! i’m eli and i’m 16 years old (in the first pic i’m 7!)

when i was 2 years old, i began to develop an eating disorder and no one knew the name or anything about it, it is now known as avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder or ARFID. it’s different from most eating disorders in that it’s sensory linked and has little do do with body image. basically, most of my life i’ve only been able to eat very few different kinds of foods. i’m still harassed and teased for my eating disorder by my family and by random strangers today.

when i was about 13, i began to hit a downward slope. i stopped doing homework and i stopped studying and would be beyond exhausted from school. i was diagnosed originally with a depressive disorder unspecified and an anxiety disorder unspecified

after rounds and rounds of med changes and therapist after therapist, it was evident that nothing was working. i was then diagnosed with ADHD and OCD. this was about a year ago

and then i began to get very ill, with extreme migraines nearly everyday and constant nausea. every illness is always blamed on my eating disorder, so that is what happened there. i was basically told that i was going to die if i didnt get rid of my eating disorder. it was terrifying and no one believed me when i said i felt like i literally couldnt physically eat foods that werent ‘safe’ for me.

about a month ago i was put into an impatient program for my eating disorder in which i was abused (i’m not going to go into details, but if you’d like to know more, you can message me. sharing what happened to me in a way helps me feel better, especially with those who can relate). i was so lucky to get out of the program after a week, when our insurance stopped covering the program at the claim that i’d had ARFID for so long that i would never be able to get rid of it (what the insurance company said saved me but was also very crushing). i’m still suffering trauma from the abuse and i have nightmares nearly every night about it and i have an extreme fear of being locked up and my thought broadcasting paranoia has worsened

i discovered that i might be autistic about 6 months ago, when i first learned how comorbid my eating disorder was with autism. however, i was unable to tell anyone due to the fact that i usually go mute when having to talk about hard subjects and after my trauma, i worried that a professional autism diagnosis would have me locked up in a hospital even more easily.

last week after visiting my doctor, i learned that they have found out that i am most likely autistic. i have to go back to the hospital in which i was abused for an autism assessment. i am relieved to finally have a diagnosis but beyond terrified to return to that hospital.

so yeah, a lot of stories on here end in nice closure but i’m still getting there. my school situation is still very bad and i still have chronic migraines as well as prediabetes from my ARFID. i’ve not always been confident about my disabilities and disorders, and i now feel like i am on the inside, even if it’s hard for me to show on the outside. 

i hope you all wish me luck, i love hearing all your stories you are all so incredible and help me to move along so much. #noshameday

Petals 007#: get well soon, dumpling

#007 - When baby Min got a fever

➽ Character/Genre/words: Min Yoongi x occasional OC | Parenthood!au, Fluff | 1,475 words

➽ a/n: based on my Baby Min headcanons


Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Ooh for the would you survive thing: daydreamer artist, has to take potassium medication, always carries phone around, believes strongly in magic and mermaids, hears the call of the sea too strongly, wears silver and gold jewelry, has a weakness for food specifically pasta, and doesn't go out much

Good news: the mermaids here believe in you, too. They really, really believe in you. You can do anything, they tell you. One has made you some kind of snack to eat while you study for the final. They are here for you.

anonymous asked:

i saw a post about how when youre living in abusive situations you should keep a backpack full of necessities and soothing things so that if you need to leave bc ur in danger or upset youre prepared!! do you have any suggestions for putting that together if this makes sense?

sure, you can check this post (link), this tag, and here’s a list of some important things to bring (not everything will apply to everyone);

There are a few approaches to this. In my opinion, it’s a good idea to have a bag packed with everything you need ready to go and to store it somewhere accessible; if there’s a shed outside for example, that’s often easier to get to in an emergency. If you use a backpack or handbag every day, you can also put a lot of these things in it and make a point to return them after you use them, so it’s ready to go if and when you need to make a quit escape, and this can also help you avoid suspicion from your abuser/s. 

This list is huge because I’m trying to make sure I don’t leave off anything that may be important, but you likely won’t need everything here. Needs vary from person to person.

Money: Cash is ideal, and hold onto as much as you can. If you can open a secret bank account and move some money into it, that can help too especially if your abuser has access to your usual account. If you open another account with your current bank, the process is often easier and some banks have a system where they can link your accounts which makes it easier to transfer money between them (and the transfers are often instant). You can also keep gift cards for grocery stores (if you want to store food stamp vouchers, look into how long you can hold them before they expire, I’m outside the US so I can’t advise). 

Mobile phone: ideally, a fully charged phone (and pack the charger too) on an active plan in your own name or with credit on it, but even a phone without money on it can be used to call emergency services. If money permits, you can also pack a phone, SIM card, and recharge voucher, though both SIM cards and recharge vouchers do expire. Familiarise yourself with how to set up the SIM or set it up beforehand (but again, some expire after 30 days so how you approach that will depend). You may also want to find out whether your country publishes numbers in their directory - sometimes you can request that your number be kept silent.  

Keys: even if you’re not planning on returning. Whatever you usually take when you leave the house (e.g. wallet, keys and phone) should come with you. Getting copies of your keys to keep in your bag is a good idea. 

Contacts: support services for survivors of abuse often have fold-out papers that look like business cards and have phone numbers of support agencies you can call in a crisis. It’s also a good idea to have hard copies of the phone numbers of friends, family, caseworkers etc in case you can’t access your phone for any reason. 

Documents: ID documents (such as your birth certificate, citizenship papers, passport, drivers license, social security cards, proof of age card etc), bank and credit cards, medical insurance proof/medicare cards, restraining orders, adoption papers, custody arrangement papers, rental agreements, and copies of any statements made to police. It’s also a good idea to get copies; you can get verified true copies by getting a Justice of the Peace to sign them, and scanning or photographing your paperwork is a good idea. You can also do this with ID cards; photocopy front and back and get these witnessed by a JoP. 

Clothes: This depends on season and weather but always bring changes of undergarments including socks, and wear closed shoes. Focus on utility rather than fashion when you pack, and try to bring something for all weather in your area. Layering to stay warm is a good approach as you can add or remove layers as the weather requires.

Weather gear: raincoat, umbrella, sleeping bag, sun hat, sunscreen, insect repellant, sunglasses, thermal undergarments, a thick jumper/jacket and the like. 

Miscellaneous: A lighter, torch, batteries, a notebook or paper and pen, and any other tools you tend to use.

Hygeine and personal care: Medications and prescriptions, toothbrush and paste, menstrual pads or tampons, baby wipes/wet wipes (even if you don’t usually use them, they’re really handy), tissues, soap, banaids and antiseptic (or a small first aid kit if possible) and anything else you use regularly. 

Keepsakes: anything you don’t want to lose that you can carry, so things like jewelery (which can also potentially be sold or borrowed against), small electronics like tablets, diaries, photographs, mementos, etc. Things like stimtoys are a good idea too, and books if you like to read. 

Items for kids: a pacifier, nappies, wet wipes, clean bottles, onesies, blankets, toys, teething gel, any papers about their custody/guardianship and birth certificates.  

Bedding: A small pillow such as a travel pillow or an inflatable one, and a sleeping bag can be helpful (even with accommodation, sometimes the beds provided are less than stellar). 

If you need to pack light: focus on ‘wallet, keys phone’, medication and hygeine, and try to bring a couple changes of undergarments and socks. Anything you’d take for a night away from home should come with you. 

Other advice: Change your digital passwords, clear your internet history and cache, and delete anything your abuser/s could use against you. If you feel comfortable, tell a neighbour what’s going on and make a plan that you can go to them for help if needed. Look into the various safety apps available and try some out with a friend. Scope out your local area and find any phone booths, stores open 24/7, police stations (and other emergency services buildings), and anywhere you could go to for help in a crisis. 

Hopefully I’ve covered everything but feel free to add!

i will not do the “keep reading” thing, so i’m sorry you have to scroll throught a lot of text, but i think this is kind of important! 

psychosis often hit around 20 years old or later, but i was just a kid. at 15 i banged my head to the wall in hope of killing the voices before they killed me. i didn’t know anything about psychosis, i was just scared. nobody i knew could fully understand what i was going through. i couldn’t seperate reality from fantasy. today, i know what my symptoms are and i find great comfort in that. 

i’m on medications that works wonders and i want to teach people about psychosis, so that they may understand their loved ones with psychotic symptoms. i also want more people to know about psychosis because, well, it’s quite misinterpreted! browsing through the psychotic tag on tumblr is a nightmare! i’m not crazy, insane, dangerous, mad, ascocial or violent!! i’m just a person with psychotic symtptoms. so here’s a masterpost about causes, triggers, coping skills and lots more about psychosis.

causes

people are born with different vulnerabilities when it comes to mental health. you can be born with a high vulnerability – different factors effects how high it is, for example if a relative had a psychotic illness the risk is higher for you. another factor is complications during pregnancy or birth. science has also shown that your vulnerability increases by use of marijuana. stress is one thing that often triggers psychotic symptoms. if you have a high vulnerability, it doesn’t take much stress.

in the brain

neurons is the brain communicate with eachohter through synapses. chemical messengers in the brain called neurotransmitters sends messages between the neurons through synapses. vulnerabilitiy by psychosis is about an imbalance in those synapses. dopamine is a neurotransmitter that reseachers believe have a big role in psychosis. dopamine is what makes us think something is important or interesting, and disrutpion in those brain functions may explain the symptoms of psychosis. medications reducing dopamine also reduces psychotic symptoms.

triggers

stress is one trigger, but many other things can also trigger psychotic symptoms. some conditions can trigger psychotic episodes in some people, that include anxiety and depression, as well as HIV, malaria and alzheimers.and cannabis isn’t the only substance that can trigger psychosis, other substances include cocaine, speed, crystal meth, ecstasy, LSD, magic mushrooms and ketamine.

symptoms

hallucinations is a psychotic symptoms. auditory hallucinations are the most common which is hearing things others around you can’t hear. all senses can develop hallucinations – seeing things that aren’t there, tasting, smelling, feeling. another symptom are delusions, a strong belief that can’t go away even though you have facts suggesting that it isn’t true. trouble thinking – having too much thoughts or having slow thoughts is a psychotic symptom. negative symptoms are things that the person with psychosis lack, unlike positive symptoms that are added to the peron with psychosis. negative symtptoms may be not having energy, feeling indifferent towards things and gestures may decrease.

catatonic behaviour is a bit more rare. it’s when the person stops moving and can be completely still for a long period of time. disorganized speech includes for example quickly jump from topic to topic or using neologisms (made up words) as well as repeat words or sentences. disorganized behaviour appears as a decline in overall daily functioning, unpredictable or inappropriate emotional responses, behaviors that can appear bizarre and have no purpose, lack of impulse control. people with psychosis may also experience more trouble functioning in social situations, isolation, trouble handling jobs or everyday chores.

coping

i know i’m just including coping skills for auditory, visual hallucinations and delusions, but i don’t really know how to cope with other types of hallucinations or other psychotic symptoms.

voices

• relax – voices are often caused by stress, so try to focus on your breathing.

• distract yourself – focus on a task or watch tv.

• ask your voices a question, that you dont know the answer to – if they dont know the answer the voices must be coming from within you.

• background sounds – people have reported that listening to music or having the tv on sort of drowns the voices.

• talk back to your voices – ask them to leave and say no if they order you to do things, remind yourself who’s in control.

• know your triggers – it may help to keep a diary of when the voices are more active.

• medication – modern anti-psychotics are 80-90% effective in revieling voices and will often make them disappear.

• hum or sing – it drowns the voices as well as distract you.

• read out loud – same with hum or sing

• open your mouth really wide – i have no idea why or if this works, but you can try it!

• just a symptom – try to think of your voices as just a symptom, and not something that has a special meaning. after all, it’s just a random thought you can hear.

visual hallucinations

• take a picture – if you’re unsure something is there you can try taking a picture

• turn away – or break eye contact, leave the room. if you don’t see it it’s not there

• shine on them  – if you see shadows you can try shining light on them from your phone flashlight

• medication – well, yeah, you get the idea. they work.

• five senses method –  acknowledge five things you can see; four things you can touch; three things you can hear; two things you can smell; one things you can taste.

delusions

• distraction – try to take your mind of it, even though it’s not that simple.

• give them facts – checking facts and statistics may help

• talk about them – in my case, the more i talked about my thoughts, the more unrealistic they seemed. That may not happen to everyone, but it is helpful to talk about them.

• know your triggers – delusions are also good to know when they’re more active.

do’s and don’t’s

•  don’t “self-medicate” - marijuana has shown to make psychotic symptoms worse and makes the risk of falling back into a psychosis bigger. other substances that can trigger/worsen/even cause psychotic symptoms are cocaine, speed, crystal meth, ecstasy, LSD, magic mushrooms and ketamine

try to manage your stress - psychotic symptoms has quite a lot to with stress. it’s also important for any mental health issue.

take care of yourself - selfcare, mindfulsness, exercise, eat reguraly and healthy, sleep well… you get the idea.

know your early signs - it’s good to know when you start getting signs of another episode, so you can adjust your medication or talk to your doctor more often so you can avoid another episode. early signs may be sleeping less or more, isolation, being annoyed or thinking “is medication even necessery?” i

don’t isolate youself - this is a early symptom for me, before i get a psychotic episode, i often isolate myself and hate the world. that often lead to me being alone with my delusions and they get worse. so try to see friends often, especially when you have early signs.

don’t assume it’s schizophrenia - it’s usually not schizophrenia. there could be many reasons and/ or illnesses for someone to have psychotic episodes. And almost everyone experience psychosis some time in their life, schizophrenia needs a half year or longer psychosis.

stop talking to toxic people - not everyone will understand psychosis, and that’s ok. but there’s a fine line between not understanding, and being toxic. if they start making jokes you’re not comfortable with or if they trigger you in some way, stop talking to them. 

don’t try to figure out what the voices mean - voices are just random thoughts coming to life. they don’t have to be true or important, they have no special meaning that you need to figure out. 

living with someone with psychotic symptoms

• keep an eye out for early symptoms (things that can happen before a psychotic episode)

• you can’t love the symptoms away, but please, show a lot of love

• their symptoms are no ones fault

• don’t challenge their delusions, they won’t go away no matter how many facts you give them

• keep a dairy of when the symptoms are more active

• one symptom of psychosis is lack of motivation and hard time starting chores. help to motivate and give them creds for what they do.

• learn about their illness, symptoms and maybe even what side effects they get from their medication. understand who the person is, and who their mental illness is.

• remind them to take medication, if they are bad at taking them themselves

• take care of yourself too, you are lovely

statistics

among people with schizophrenia, which is a psychotic illness, 1 in ten commits suicide. that makes suicide the leading cause of premature death among people with the illness. but it’s worth to keep fighting as 15-25% recovers and 50% improves. and with more understanding and love, as well as less fear and stigma, the number of suicides may go down.