mechanica

3

HALLOWEEN/ OCTOBER 2015 BOOK HAUL

Shit. I’m broke. Happy, but broke. 

2

The Balancing Bird.

I had one of these ‘balancing birds’ when I was young. It was just a toy back then. But now, it is the profound way that I know of to demonstrate the center of mass.

Center of mass is the point on a body where all the object’s mass is concentrated. 

When an object is supported at its center of mass there is no net torque acting on the body and hence it will remain in static equilibrium. 

2

Hi everyone! So, because I’m excited about advance copies of my second book, Mechanica, coming out soon, I’ve decided that I feel like sending a bunch of review copies of my first book, Tides, to my dear Tumblr friends. LOTS OF YOU. Like, this is not a contest. I will send up to, I dunno, MANY.

So here is the deal! I will send you an e-copy of my selkies-and-magic-and-queerness-and-romance YA debut if you agree to post an honest review on Goodreads and/or Amazon. You just have to be following me and agree to write a review (it doesn’t even have to be a good one). That is all.

If you want to read a new book but don’t have extra money right now–or if you’re a book blogger, or would like to try your hand at being one–this is for you. Send me your email address or reblog with a “yes please!” or similar and I’ll hook you up.

And if you want to talk about the book on Tumblr or anywhere else, of course, that’s just a bonus and I will extra love you.

Yay for free reading!

9

[attempts to take photos of cosplay in my crowded bedroom with only a self-timer camera]  ok so I might be able to get my friend to take better pictures later but for now it’s these and some other from my ipad camera which will also be here. Two versions because my mum gave me the hat and waistcoat!

2

Mechanica by Betsy Cornwell

Nicolette’s awful stepsisters call her “Mechanica” to demean her, but the nickname fits: she learned to be an inventor at her mother’s knee. Her mom is gone now, though, and the Steps have turned her into a servant in her own home.

But on her sixteenth birthday, Nicolette discovers a secret workshop in the cellar and begins to dare to imagine a new life for herself. Could the mysterious books and tools hidden there—and the mechanical menagerie, led by a tiny metal horse named Jules—be the key to escaping her dreary existence? With a technological exposition and royal ball on the horizon, the timing might just be perfect for Nicolette to earn her freedom at last.

Gorgeous prose and themes of social justice and family shine in this richly imagined Cinderella retelling about an indomitable inventor who finds her prince … but realizes she doesn’t want a fairy tale happy ending after all.


I received a free copy via Edelweiss for review purposes.

I’ve had my eye on Mechanica for a while now because I love fairytale retellings. Cornwell takes some of the most memorable traits from Cinderella, but makes it her own, creating this original steampunk take on one of our childhood favourite fairytales. Nicolette’s mother was an inventor, and she taught Nicolette mostly everything she knew. After her mother’s death, Nicolette’s father remarried - and we know how the rest goes; there is a ball, a prince, but also an exposition where Nicolette can show of her inventions and finally earn her freedom from her evil Stepmother and step-sisters, but does Nicolette get a happy ever after?

My favourite part of Mechanica was the beginning, which started off very strongly, and we learned the history of the kingdom, of the fae, the political tensions between humans and the fae, and the background of Nicolette herself. I thought the world-building was great and I loved the incorporation of Fae and their magic. This was one of the high points of the novel. I loved several of the characters too, though I can’t say that Nicolette was one of them (though I rather admired her strength).

Mechanica strays quite a lot from the original source material, but that’s what makes it’s a great and original story. The reason this is not getting a higher rating from me is because I felt it was rather slow during the middle, and the resolution was all quite neat, even with some political tensions between the fae and humans still left unanswered and unresolved. In fact, it actually leaves it quite open for a sequel.

For those concerned, Mechanica is absolutely nothing at all like Cinder. The only thing they share in common is that they’re both inventors/mechanics, though Mechanica is set in a steampunk setting. Otherwise, the story and characters differ vastly. I wouldn’t pass this up because you’re worried about it being a carbon copy of Cinder.

Overall, I think it could have been better, but an enjoyable read nonetheless.

RATING: ★★★☆☆

Pre-order at Book Depository

6

Upcoming releases: August 2015 part one

MECHANICA by Betsy Cornwell

Publisher Synopsis:
Nicolette’s awful stepsisters call her “Mechanica” to demean her, but the nickname fits: she learned to be an inventor at her mother’s knee. Her mom is gone now, though, and the Steps have turned her into a servant in her own home.

But on her sixteenth birthday, Nicolette discovers a secret workshop in the cellar and begins to dare to imagine a new life for herself. Could the mysterious books and tools hidden there—and the mechanical menagerie, led by a tiny metal horse named Jules—be the key to escaping her dreary existence? With a technological exposition and royal ball on the horizon, the timing might just be perfect for Nicolette to earn her freedom at last.

Gorgeous prose and themes of social justice and family shine in this richly imagined Cinderella retelling about an indomitable inventor who finds her prince … but realizes she doesn’t want a fairy tale happy ending after all.