mdha

MDHA Responds to NewsChannel 5 Allegations

During the past year, MDHA has defended against allegations it paid property owners too little. Now the agency finds itself facing allegations it paid a land owner too much. The confusion underscores the fact that real estate acquisition can be complicated and emotional.

In the case of the recent story about Rocketown and the Music City Center, NewsChannel5 gets it wrong. NewsChannel5’s story pits the claims of a former employee against the agency without ever offering an outside, independent, third party review. The responsible thing would have been to seek a third opinion on the validity of the allegations, as MDHA did in determining the property’s value.

MDHA followed the same process with Rocketown as it followed with other real estate purchases by the agency. The process goes like this: MDHA researches the value of a property, makes an offer and then works to find a mutually acceptable purchase price. Following this process, MDHA has reached a mutually acceptable purchase price with 14 of 17 property owners in the footprint of the Music City Center.

Let’s look at the specifics of the Rocketown purchase.

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LifeWay Christian Resources' Offer to Buy New 1.5 Acre Site In Nashville Has Been Accepted

LifeWay Christian Resources’ Offer to Buy New 1.5 Acre Site In Nashville Has Been Accepted

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Photo from Google LifeWay Christian Resources’ offer to purchase 1.5 acres in downtown Nashville for a new office building has been accepted, the Southern Baptist entity announced Tuesday (July 21).   (more…)

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MDHA Housing Opportunities

Metropolitan Development  and Housing Agency (MDHA) in Davidson County will accept applications ONLINE ONLY for two and three bedrooms in the Contemporary housing properties (see list below) beginning Monday, November 17, 2014 at 7:30 am and ending Sunday December 14, 2014 at 4:00 pm.

All applications submitted between November 17th at 7:30 am and December 14th at 4:00 pm have an equal chance of being placed near the top of the waiting list.  See qualifications below:

Applications will be accepted ONLINE ONLY.  Apply online at www.nashville-mdha.org.   The application link will not be available until 7:30 am on November 17, 2014.  Applying online is convenient, fast and you’ll be notified immediately by e-mail that your application has been received. In order to apply online, you will need to register a user ID and password. You must also have a valid e-mail address.  Applicants must have $10,400 in stable annual income, or be elderly or disabled and receive social security or SSI. Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) applicants must have been participating in a training program of 20 or more hours weekly for the past 6 months.  All applicants must be able to get utilities in their own name.

Each applicant’s position on the waiting list is NOT on a first-come, first served basis. It’s NOT necessary to stand in line or rush in on the first day to be one of the first to submit an application. The date and time an application is submitted will have no effect on an applicant’s position on the waiting list. More information on how the process works will be available when the application is completed.

The Contemporary properties are:

J. Henry Hale 1433 Jo Johnston Avenue

Levy Place 303 Foster Street

Parkway Terrace 196 North 7th Street

Preston Taylor Apartments 3900 Clifton Road

Vine Hill Apartments 601 Benton Avenue

Please check out my web site Minnesota North Outdoors for this story and more like it.

While many organizations and experts preach getting youth involved in the outdoors in a positive manner, few push that agenda with as much conviction as the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association and their partners involved with the Forkhorn Summer Camp programs held each year across the state.

The idea behind Forkhorn camp, which according to the MDHA was started in 1985, is to teach kids between the ages of 11 and 17 the ins-and-outs of the outdoors and hunting through a unique hands-on, interactive experience.

Each summer, week-long camps are held at eight different facilities across the state, including one in our backyard - the Laurentian Environmental Learning Center (LEC) in Britt. Other locations where Forkhorn Camps are held include: Audubon Center of the Northwoods near Sandstone, Minn.; Three Rivers Park District near Maple Plain, Minn.; Deep Portage Conservation Reserve near Hackensack, Minn.; Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center near Lanesboro, Minn.; Kiwanis Boy Scout Camp near St. Croix, Minn.; Long Lake Conservation Center near Palisade, Minn.; and Prairie Woods Environmental Learning Center near Spicer, Minn.

The MDHA offers three different levels of the camp including Forkhorn I, Forkhorn II, and Forkhorn III, where kids are taught everything from firearms safety to ethical hunting practices, bowhunting, map and compass navigation, big game ecology, advanced marksmanship and more.

Classes are taught by LEC professional teaching staff that hold Minnesota Firearms Safety Instructor, bowhunting and advanced hunting certifications and the camps include all meals, lodging, instruction and use of equipment, which is part of the appeal of the program considering some youth may not have access to the type of gear available to Forkhorn participants.

The camps normally cost upwards of $400 to participate but here’s the catch - The MDHA offers hundreds of scholarships yearly to young campers who are either members of MDHA or an immediate family member to someone who belongs to the organization. MDHA chapters raise money all year long to fund the scholarships through different activities like the Hides-for-Habitat program or yearly banquets featuring auctions for guns and other outdoors equipment.

While membership doesn’t guarantee a scholarship, chances are good youth members will get one, which minimizes the cost dramatically.

The following are short descriptions of the three levels of Forkhorn Camp and dates the camps are being offered at LEC. For dates and information related to any other locations, just click on the name above and you’ll be taken to their web pages.

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Forkhorn I is designed for beginning hunters and provides extensive hands-on instruction in basic firearms safety and shooting techniques using rifles, shotguns, muzzleloaders and bows. It also provides hunting tips for both big and small game. Students may earn their Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Firearm Safety Certification through the camp. 

                               Classes include:                                                                                
Firearm Safety
Beginning Rifle, Shotgun and Archery
Wildlife Management                                                                                   
Whitetail Deer Ecology                                                                                
Outdoor Survival Skills
Map and Compass Orienteering
Deer Hunting Techniques                                                           
Safe Shooting Scenarios
Hunter Ethics

Students must be 11 years of age on the first day of camp to attend and cost (without a scholarship) is $425 per person which includes instruction, lodging, home cooked meals and use of equipment. Small class sizes for more individual instruction. Enrollment limited to 40 students. Parents may attend with their child at no additional cost.

  • Dates available at LEC for 2013 include:
  • June 16 - 21
  • July 21 - 26
  • Aug. 4 - 9
  • Aug. 11 - 16
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Forkhorn II is an advanced Forkhorn Camp that focuses on bowhunting for youth who are graduates of Forkhorn I or have earned their Firearms Safety Certification. It is a more intensive camp that takes students beyond basic whitetail deer hunting knowledge and strategies, and provides them with advanced training.

Classes include:
Bowhunting

Map and Compass Navigation Special Hunting Techniques  

Ethical Hunting Practices Big Game Ecology

Field Dressing                                                                                                                          
Students must be 12 years of age or older and have passed a Firearms Safety Training Course to be eligible for this camp and cost (without a scholarship) is $425 per person which includes instruction, lodging, home-cooked meals and use of equipment. Small class sizes for more individual instruction. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Parents may attend with their child at no additional cost. Students may bring their own bow for this program.


Dates at LEC for Forkhorn II include:

  • July 28 - Aug. 2 2013
  • Aug. 4-9 2013

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Forkhorn III is designed for youth, ages 12-17, who already have their Firearms Safety Certification and significant hunting experience. This camp is designed for those seeking to expand their knowledge on big and small game hunting tips and techniques as well as hunter ethics.

Classes include:
Firearms Safety Review
Advanced Marksmanship
Beginning Handgun Shooting and Safety
Big and Small Game Ecology and Hunting
Hunter Ethics and Responsibilities

Students must be 12 years of age or older and have passed a Firearms Safety Training Course to be eligible for this camp and cost (without a scholarship) is $425 per person which includes instruction, lodging, home cooked meals and use of equipment. Small class sizes for more individual attention. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Parents may attend with their child at no additional cost.

Dates at LEC for Forkhorn III include:

  • July 28 - Aug. 2, 2013

Again, financial assistance and scholarships are available through the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association. To find out if you qualify contact your local chapter. If you aren’t a member of MDHA, you can get more information on how to join at www.mndeerhunters.com or by calling 218-327-1130.

You can also get more information about the camps at Laurentian Environmental Center in Britt by visiting their web site HERE or by calling them at 1-888-749-1288.

MDHA - Building Extraordinary Lives

Nashville's Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency administers a variety of urban and community development projects, works to increase the availabilty of affordable housing and leads and supports revitalization efforts in downtown and neighborhoods throughout Nashville.

Currently, approximately 27,000 people live in MDHA owned properties and the agency has been part of the development of numerous Nashville landmarks such as the AT&T Building, Nashville Downtown Library, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Schermerhorn Symphony Center, and LP Field. MDHA is currently overseeing the first two projects to transform Nashville’s waterfront and is assisting with development of the new Music City Center and convention center headquarters hotel.

In 2010, MDHA was selected by the Nashville Post as one of the 50 Most Eco-Friendly Companines in Middle Tennessee for our work to encourage sustainable building and for energy-efficient upgrades at many of our properties. With solar arrays atop three of our high-rise residential buildings, MDHA is one of the largest solar power generators in Tennessee. We are also using geothermal heating and cooling as well as state-of-the-art VRV (Variable Refrigerant Volume) heating and cooling systems at most of our residential high-rises. MDHA estimates the use of VRV systems, which have replaced window air units, will reduce carbon emissions by more than 603,000 lbs. per year.

MDHA is governed by a seven-member Board of Commissioners, two of whom are residents of public housing and serve for a five-year term. The Commissioners, who serve without pay, are appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the Metropolitan Council.

http://www.nashville-mdha.org/index.php

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Senior Living at MDHA Communities

More than 960 senior residents call MDHA properties home, including 26 people over age 90 and two over age 100. Three properties, Edgefield Manor, Carleen Batson Waller Manner, and Gernert Studio Apartments are designated as seniors-only and are home to vibrant communities of active resident associations who plan weekly gatherings and monthly outings like fashion shows, bingo and movie night. All high-rise facilities also offer monthly activities such as exercise classes, special education seminars, movies, birthday and holiday celebrations.

All utilities are included with the price of rent, which is based on income. That can be a major convenience for seniors living on a limited income. Most buildings feature fitness rooms and all have laundry facilities and modern appliances.

In recent years, MDHA has strengthened its focus on its senior and disabled residents. Major renovations at Gernert Studio Apartments, Edgefield Manor and Parthenon Towers are complete with upgrades underway at Hadley Park Towers and Vine Hill Towers. Improvements to the high-rise facilities include the addition of energy-efficient central heating and cooling systems; improved floor-space utilization; new kitchen appliances; and major energy upgrades.

MDHA provides Social Service Coordinators at all high-rise apartments which help link residents to community service providers that assist with aging in place. Social Service Coordinators also help residents acquire needed benefits, complete forms or paper work as needed, look for risk factors to determine living independently, establish a referral process, monitor on-going services and serve as an advocate for the resident.

In addition, security personnel are in place at all high-rise properties and most are equipped with state-of-the-art security camera systems.

Each year MDHA honors a very distinct group of seniors – The 90+ Club. The 90+ Club is an exclusive group consisting of 26 public housing residents who are ages 90 and above, including two people over age 100.

Seniors are an important part of the MDHA community and the agency is pleased to be home to such a great group of valued residents.

Nance Place - the new workforce apartment community near downtown on Rolling Mill Hill - is gearing up for the official grand opening July 26! This new building - constructed by MDHA and managed by Freeman Webb Company - will be LEED for Homes Gold Certified and will be the first Mid-Rise LEED Certified residential building in Tennessee! It has 109 units, underground parking, is on the bus line and has an interior courtyard.

Nance Place is located at 8 Academy Place just off Hermitage Avenue. It’s a beautiful new building and we can’t wait to show it off!

Join MDHA and Mayor Dean on Tuesday, July 26, 5:30 p.m., at Nance Place and check out Nashville’s newest workforce apartment community!

MDHA Supports Summer Fun & Learning for Nashville Children

Thousands of youth in Nashville, Tennessee are enjoying their hot summer months by participating in programs that teach them important life skills… and they get to have a little fun, too. Each year MDHA awards grants to area non-profits in Nashville to support Summer Youth Programs. These programs support a variety of activities for kids age six to 18, like academic classes, sports, arts, cultural enrichment and job training classes.

This year, MDHA is pleased to provide $468,000 in funds to support 24 area non-profits in their outreach effort to Nashville’s youth. It’s another way that MDHA is working to build extraordinary lives in Nashville - especially for our city’s children.

Here’s more on today’s announcement as well as a list of the area Nashville non-profits participating in this summer’s programs.

  http://www.nashville-mdha.org/view_news.php?id=118 

Rolling Mill Hill rolls along with groundbreaking for Ryman Lofts, Nashville’s first affordable community specifically designed for artists, and the Historic Trolley Barns, Nashville’s new center for creativity and innovation!
http://www.nashville-mdha.org/view_news.php?id=145

MDHA - Summer Youth Programs
Thousands of youth in Nashville, Tennessee are enjoying their hot summer months by participating in programs that teach them important life skills… and they get to have a little fun, too. Each year MDHA awards grants to area non-profits in Nashville to support Summer Youth Programs. These programs support a variety of activities for kids age six to 18, like academic classes, sports, arts, cultural enrichment and job training classes.
This year, MDHA is pleased to provide $468,000 in funds to support 24 area non-profits in their outreach effort to Nashville’s youth. It’s another way that MDHA is working to build extraordinary lives in Nashville - especially for our city’s children.