mayo-thompson

Leejol
The Red Krayola
Leejol

God Bless The Red Krayola And All Who Sail With It is one of my favourite albums for reasons that are really hard to explain. At the risk of sounding ostentatious, it’s like trying to make sense of a baffling dream. It’s also unapologetically free and very spontaneous feeling. I’d almost say it’s more daring and just as forward thinking as what The Velvet Underground were doing at the time.

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your red nails against your skin

and you against the wall

sometimes…

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the red krayola - born in flames (1980)

featuring lora logic (of x-ray spex and essential logic) on vocals.

With the Raincoats, you have Vicky Aspinall, who’s a trained player. She can read it, and all that kind of stuff. And then, some primitives who have a feeling for music, like Ana da Silva, who’s got a certain kind of primitive relationship to it. She likes that scratchy, nasty guitar. I like it too, but I don’t want to make that the point of the record. If that’s the point of the record, then it’s a very simple, straightforward sort of thing to do. Whereas what they were doing seemed to me to be more complex than that. It was about this element, this feeling, that drives one to make music in the first place, and the whole idea that music somehow soothes the savage beast, belongs to the organism, and has something to do with the way we are, the feelings, and all those kinds of things. I would say that the Slits were more attitudinal, and the Raincoats were more musical. The Raincoats were not trying to convince anybody about who they were, or what kind of people they were, or those kinds of things.
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“Explain the Red Krayola? It cannot be—it shouldn’t be explainable. Unless I misunderstand art altogether… the game is to test the limits of popular music.”

Horses
Mayo Thompson
Horses

Though he spent most of the 60s working as The Red Krayola, legendary underground psychedelic Mayo Thompson managed to chip off an album under his own name in 1969.  Corky’s Debt to His Father was originally released by Texas Revolution Records, but saw little circulation until the 90s when it was reissued by Chicago’s Drag City label.  In Thompson's Horses, the ancestry of a young Kevin Barnes (of Montreal) is heard, both in the cutely off beat cantillation and in the bedroom-style lo-fi instrumentation.