mayan gods

The Signs as Mayan Deities.
  • Aries: <i>Buluc Chabtan</i> was the god of war, violence and death to whom human beings were sacrificed regularly.
  • Taurus: <i>Ah Uaynih</i> was goddess of sleep. She was especially helpful in putting men to sleep.
  • Gemini: <i>Cacoch</i> was a creator god who presides over creativity and communication.
  • Cancer: <i>Ixchel</i> was the goddess of the moon, childbirth, pregnancy and rainbows.
  • Leo: <i>Ah Bolom Tzacab</i> was the god of aristocracy, royalty, kings and queens.
  • Virgo: <i>Ixcuiname</i> was the goddess of the four ages of womankind; life of child, maiden, mother, crone is unclear.
  • Libra: <i>Ndozin</i> was the god of death and justice. He is also the "Lord of the Night".
  • Scorpio: <i>Ixazalvoh</i> was the goddess of water, life, and weaving. She also presides over female sexuality.
  • Sagittarius: <i>Ahulane</i> was war god associated with archery and known as The Archer.
  • Capricorn: <i>Alaghom Naom</i> was the goddess of the mind, thoughts and inspiration.
  • Aquarius: <i>Acat</i> was god of the art of tattooing and patron of tattoo artists.
  • Pisces: <i>Ixtab</i> was the goddess of suicides and, particularly, those who died by hanging.
shiv

///


November 14th.
In the coffee shop,
the man in the
Make America Great Again hat
smiles at me, so I take this
as an invitation.


“Pardon me, but I have to ask—
do you think Trump’s
ideologies keep every person
in this country safe?“


He doesn’t hesitate.


“Ma’am, I can’t get wrapped up
in identity politics, all I can
worry about is how
I’m going to feed my girls.”


///


At my 40th birthday party,
an acquaintance asks
why we have “so much
Mexican art in the house.”

“It might be because I’m Mexican,” I say.

“No,” he laughs, “you’re not Mexican.”

“Yes. I am.”

“No,” he continues, reassuringly,
“and if you are, you’re only, maybe, 17%.“

The winter air stiffens between us.
An old, familiar pain.


///


There was a time when I
would have thanked him.


The early years,
when I wanted only to pass,
to rid myself of my last name—
the dead giveaway,
its muddy lineage


crawl out from the burying shame
that held me down every time
my father picked me up
from school in our shitty car,
his bushy mustache
& brown face
magnified by the sun.


///


A local white woman
posts a photo of her new tattoo:
a Mayan god etched eternal
on her flesh. When I point out
the disrespect, she assures me
she speaks Spanish fluently,
spent three years
in South America.


For the next six hours,
I argue with her friends.
They demand I quit being so
divisive. Judgemental. Close-minded.


“We have a racist running for President,
and you’re complaining about a tattoo?”
asks the white boy, who spray paints
murals all over this city
with impunity.


O, to be permitted the luxury
of only worrying about one thing at a time.


O, to be white in America,
to wake up knowing every god is your god.


///


When you never see yourself,
you search for yourself all the time.


You know the white girl
in the sombrero isn’t you.
The bro dude in Calavera makeup
isn’t either, not the ponchos
and glued on mustaches,
not the lowrider Chevy
in the Disney movie
or the hoochie-coochie
sex pot on the Emmy
award-winning television show.


Maybe you are only this:


the scorched bird pulled
from the chimney,
covered in soot.
Not the actual bird,
its velvet sack
of jigsaw’d bones,
but the feeling
of recognition.


The ash of knowing.


///


A white comedian tells this joke:
“I used to date Hispanics,
but now I prefer consensual.”


The audience laughs.
And you do, too.
Until the punchline hardens,
translates into a stone
in your throat.


You swallow it, like you always do.


You don’t change the channel,
but you also can’t remember
a single joke she tells after that.


A few months later, the comedian’s career
blows up. She’s so real. So edgy.
Such a hardcore feminist.
When someone writes an essay on
her old stand-up routines—
noting her blindspot when it comes to race,


her response is:


“It is a joke and it is funny.
I know that because people laugh at it.”


///


If two Mexicans are in a car, who is driving?
A police officer.


How do you starve a Mexican?
Put their food stamps in their work boots.


What’s the difference between a Mexican and an elevator?
One can raise a child.


What do you call a Mexican baptism?
Bean dip


How do you stop a Mexican from robbing your house?
Put a help wanted sign in the window.


What do you call a Mexican driving a BMW?
Grand theft auto


What do you call a Mexican without a lawnmower?
Unemployed


What do you call a building full of Mexicans?
Jail


How do you keep Mexicans from stealing?
Put everything of value on the top shelf.


What do you call a bunch of Mexicans running downhill?
A mudslide.


Why don’t Mexicans play Hide ’n Seek?
No one will look for them.


What does a Mexican get for Christmas?
Your TV.


What do you call the Arizona man shot to death
by his white neighbor, screaming, “Go back to Mexico!”
Juan Varela


///


November 29th.
For weeks, I’ve avoided
eye contact with strangers.
My face is a closed curtain.
My mouth, the most
decorated knife.
I pay for groceries,
grab the receipt &
let my half-hearted
thank yous trail like smoke.
I no longer want to see
who refuses to see me.


Anyone is everyone.


///


December 1st.
I keep waking up.
There isn’t anyone
white enough to stop me.


Pantomime the living until
the body remembers:
wicked bitch. Bloodwhirl.
Patron Saint of the Grab Back.


Still. Still. Still. Still. Still. Still here.


///


I etch my own face upon my wicked flesh.
I am my own devastating god.

 


Rachel McKibbens, Dec. 2016

2

Tlaltecuhtli - Earth and Sky Goddess

Tlaltecuhtli has both feminine and masculine attributes, although she is most often represented as a female deity. Her name means “The one who gives and devours life”, and she represents the earth and the sky, and was one of the gods in the Aztec pantheon most hungry for human sacrifice.

According to Aztec mythology, at the origin of time (the “First Sun”), the gods Quetzalcoatl and Tezcatlipoca began to create the world. But the monster Tlaltecuhtli destroyed everything they were creating. The gods turned themselves into giant serpents and wrapped their bodies around the goddess until they tore Tlaltecuhtli’s body into two pieces.

One piece of Tlaltecuhtli’s body became the earth, mountains and rivers; her hair became trees and flowers; her eyes the caves and wells. The other piece became the vault of the sky, although in this early time no sun or stars were embedded in it yet.

Image Credit - Earth Goddess Tlaltecuhtli by jaggudada

3

The king vulture was extremely prominent in Mayan mythology, lending its name and glyph to the 13th day of the month (Cozcacuauhtli, or vulture in Nahui).  The messenger between humans and the gods was said to be a deity in the form of a winged man with the head of a king vulture, which many have suggested is why the king vulture is called “king”.  It was also believed that the vulture’s blood and feathers were cures for many diseases.

The signs as mythological creatures

Aries : Griffin ( Greek )
- a legendary creature with the body, tail and back legs of a lion ; the head and wings of an eagle; and an eagle’s talons as its front feet. The lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle the king of birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature.

Taurus : Auðumbla ( Norse )
- a primeval cow ; Auðumbla’s name appears in different variations in Prose Edda manuscripts. In some legends Auðumbla licked man called Búri out of ice blocks.

Gemini : Huginn and Muninn ( Norse )
- two ravens that fly all over the world and bring informations to the god Odin ; Odin gave them the ability to speak.

Cancer : Rain Bird ( Native American )
- a bird who bought rain ; the rain is symbolised as the bringer of life by the Native Americans. The Rain Bird was also often drawn on some of the Native American pottery; it brought life by watering their plants and hence, giving food & water to the animals they hunted.

Keep reading

Locals stumble across ancient Mayan god monument while clearing debris in Mexico

Locals accidentally uncovered an ancient Mayan artefact while clearing debris on privately-owned land in the Mexican state of Chiapas.

The monument, believed to be the head of the Mayan god of maize and abundance, dates back to the late classical period between 600 and 900 AD. It was found underneath a house in the city of Suchiapa.

Archaeologists of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) identified the authenticity and antiquity of the artefact.

The monument has been kept at the Regional Museum of Chiapas since it was found in September 2016.

The Maya civilisation emerged from the Yucatan Peninsula, in the south of what is now Mexico and parts of Belize and Guatemala. It was one of the most advanced and iconic pre-Colombian civilisations. Read more.

The year is 2026. You wake up, sweating. You check your clock, 4 a.m. in the morning it is.

“Something’s wrong”, you think.

You grab your phone, knowing that it will be hard for you to go back to sleep again. You scroll down the social network you always use, and you see it.

“NEW 5-BOOK SERIES, coming out NEXT SPRING: James Jackson AND THE MAYAN GODS”

You sigh. You can’t believe Riordan did it again. Get ready to read 5 more books motherfucker.

🌻Gods and Goddesses🌻

These are not so well known Gods and Goddesses (At least they were for me). 

Andumbulu is an African underworld god who rules alongside his brother Yeban.

Vairocana is the Tibetan wisdom god who sits in the middle of a mandala.

Giii is the Mayan Sun-faced fire god. He likes the number four and has control over droughts.

Rheda (Hrethe) is the Anglo-Saxon goddess of victory, but she can be fickle; worship her with caution.

Chasca is a crepuscular goddess of Incan people, protecting virgins.

Mahina is the Hawaiian Moon goddess, who goes on sabbatical when her family gets on her nerves.

Coniraya is an Incan god of fertility and fecundity, bringing life to everything he touches- without requiring a mate.

Dyaus is an Indian sky god who once divided himself in half.

Haokah is the Sioux god of thunder, a trickster who cries when happy and laughs when sad.

Ba-ja is a Chinese god of scarecrows, with an eagle’s beak and talons, blue skin, and a general’s cloak. 

Pellervoinen is the Finish god of agriculture, who wakes in spring to dance around sowing crops.

Vajravarathi is a Tibetan animal goddess; she is entirely red and has the face of a sow.

Aha-njoku is the African goddess of yams; she helps farmers get a good harvest.

Huichaana is a Mayan creator goddess who made humanity.