Chen Mul Censer with Skulls
This chen mul style censer ( a container in which incense is burnt during a religious ceremony ) probably represents a young wind god or a priest dressed with the wind god’s symbols , and dates between 1250 - 1550 AD .

Liverpool’s World Museum is uncovering the world of the ancient Mayas this week in a major free exhibition of treasures direct from Mexico,

Mayas: revelation of an endless time, which opened on Friday, is the flagship exhibition in the nationwide cultural programme for the Year of Mexico in the UK, with Liverpool the only place to host the show in the country.

And with almost 400 stunning objects, it’s also the biggest temporary exhibition ever staged by National Museums Liverpool.

The artworks, brought together from various historic sites and institutions in Mexico, were previously shown in Mexico City, Sao Paolo in Brazil and Paris.

The ancient Maya kingdoms stretched from eastern Mexico to modern day Guatemala, Belize and into western Honduras and El Salvador, from 1000BC to 1542.

Colin Gould

Feathered Snake
Such snake sculptures were used as columns and plinths to decorate important buildings in Chichén Itzá, the ancient Mayan site at Yucatan , Mexico . They symbolized the god Kukulcán ( Quetzal Snake ) , the principal creator of the sky .

Liverpool’s World Museum is uncovering the world of the ancient Mayas this week in a major free exhibition of treasures direct from Mexico,

Mayas: revelation of an endless time, which opened on Friday, is the flagship exhibition in the nationwide cultural programme for the Year of Mexico in the UK, with Liverpool the only place to host the show in the country.

And with almost 400 stunning objects, it’s also the biggest temporary exhibition ever staged by National Museums Liverpool.

The artworks, brought together from various historic sites and institutions in Mexico, were previously shown in Mexico City, Sao Paolo in Brazil and Paris.

The ancient Maya kingdoms stretched from eastern Mexico to modern day Guatemala, Belize and into western Honduras and El Salvador, from 1000BC to 1542.

Colin Gould

The Maya archaeological site of Muyil, located in the modern State of Quintana Roo, Mexico. It is thought to date from approximately the Middle Formative period (before 400 BC), and was continuously occupied up to the arrival of the Spanish. From this point it was abandoned, with no evidence of Maya or European occupation until the 1800s.

Photo taken by Cristopher Gonzalez.